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Thread: Traditional European music

  1. #51
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    Post Re: Traditional European music

    1) Newgrange

    Your mysteries lay hidden in stones that can't speak,
    Thru' time all your wondrous knowledge we seek,
    Be ye tomb or ye temple we'd like to know why
    On mid-winter's morning you seek light from the sky,
    Your white quartz stones must have brightened the days
    When the sun it shone down and reflected its rays,
    You refuse us a key or some Rosetta Stone,
    We gaze on just circles and motiffs and bones.


    chorus:

    Sing away Bru/ na Bo/inne on the Banks of the Boyne,
    Fal de da for your glory would not yield to time,
    Glory o! to the men and the women laid to rest
    Who brought greatness to Ireland, the Isle of the Blessed.


    From your pillars of grandeur an the answer is sought,
    When the tombs of the Pharoahs were only a thought,
    Irish folk in their labour looked up from the Boyne
    To see standing a monument that would not yield to time.
    You saw Cheftains, Na Fianna and monks stopped to call
    As they trampled the hills onto Tara's Royal Halls,
    And they watched on the cradle of our art and design
    That inspired Irish artists much later in time.


    Chorus:

    For you're set in a county still royal with its arms
    With a river of beauty with countless wild charms.
    You stand there majestic and tower on the plain,
    And your Passage of Wonder a secret remains.
    So be proud all of Ireland of a history long gone,
    That inspired generations of men later on.
    Your age is your greatness and a testament still
    As we look at Bru/ na Bo/inne on a Co. Meath hill







    2) [I]A Stor Mo Chroi[/I] (instrumental version)

    A stor mo chroi, when you're far away
    From the land you will soon be leaving,
    And it's many a time by night and by day
    That your heart will be sorely grieving.
    For the stranger's land may be bright and fair,
    And rich with its treasures golden.
    But you'll pine, I know, for the long, long ago
    And the love that is never olden.

    A stor mo chroi, in the stranger's land
    There is plenty of wealth and wailing.
    Where gems adorn both the great and the grand
    There are faces with hunger pailing.
    The road may be tiresome and hard to tread
    And the lights of their cities may blind you.
    Won't you turn, a stor, Erin's shore
    And the ones you have left behind you.

    A stor mo chroi, when the evening's fog
    On the mountain and sea is falling,
    Won't you turn away, far from the throng
    And maybe you'll hear me calling.
    For the sound of a voice that is surely missed
    Is asking for your returning.
    Á ruín, Á ruín, won't you come back soon
    To the ones who will always love you







    3) Lonely Banna Strand

    'Twas on Good Friday Morning all in the month of May
    A German ship was signalling beyond out in the bay.
    "We've twenty thousand rifles all ready for to land!"
    But no answering signal did comefrom the lonely Banna Strand.

    'No signal answers from the shore,' Sir Roger sadly said,
    'No comrades here to meet me, alas! they must be dead;
    But I must do my duty and at once I mean to land,'
    So in a boat he pulled ashore to lonely Banna Strand.

    The R.I. C. were hunting for Sir Roger high and low,
    They found him at McKenna's Fort, said they: 'You are our foe.'
    Said he, 'I'm Roger Casement, I came to my native land,
    I meant to free my countrymen on the lonely Banna Strand.'

    They took Sir Roger prisoner and sailed for London Tower,
    And in the Tower they laid him as a traitor to the Crown.
    Said he, 'I m no traitor,' but his trial he had to stand.
    For bringing German rifles to the lonely Banna Strand.

    'Twas in an English prison that they led him to his death.
    'I'm dying for my country,' he said with his last breath.
    They buried him in British soil far from his native land
    And the wild waves sing his Requiem on lonely Banna Strand.

    They took Sir Roger home again, in the year of '65
    and with his comrades of '16, he in peace and tranquil lies
    his last fond wish it is fulfilled, for to lie in his native land
    and the waves will roll in peace again on the lonely Banna Strand

  2. #52
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    Post Re: Traditional European music

    Quote Originally Posted by Johannes de León
    Portuguese Guitar.



    Carlos Paredes - Canto de Amor
    That's really nice, Johannes de León.
    The Portuguese guitar has quite a distinctive sound

  3. #53
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    Post Re: Traditional European music

    I like the German band In Extremo, they play folk metal with bagpipes and sometimes sing in rare European dialects. I have a temporary radio show, that I host every 2 weeks for 1/2 hour though I don't know when my next show is. The last show I had I played much German music as well as one song in Gaelic by a band from Dublin called Cruachan. My favorite song ever is Stetit Puella by In Extremo which is very passionate, sung in German and Latin and with furious bagpipes! For my next show I will play a song called Maria Virgin by them, it was originally written by King Alphonso X of Spain in the 12th century.
    SVMDEVSSVMCAESARSVMCAELVMETINFERNVM

  4. #54
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    Post Re: Traditional European music

    Quote Originally Posted by Imperator X
    I like the German band In Extremo, they play folk metal with bagpipes and sometimes sing in rare European dialects.
    I know them, i have two albums, i don't like it that much.

    For my next show I will play a song called Maria Virgin by them, it was originally written by King Alfonso X of Castilla in the 13th century.
    From the book Cantigas de Santa Maria, right?
    .

  5. #55
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    Post Re: Traditional European music

    Traditional Bandurist music of Ukraine is very nice. Luckily one of my favorite bands is from my area. This band does many great renditions of Ukrainian folk and sacred music!

    http://www.bandura.org/

    Driven by passion, tradition, and history, the all-male Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus preserves and exemplifies its mission as ambassadors of Ukrainian culture, music and the unique 60 stringed instrument, bandura. Formed at the beginning of the 20th century, our ensemble continues to make history with ongoing international concerts, a continued education program for youth, new recordings, and new talent. Intense passion for music by our members is united behind the common goal to extend the tradition of our predecessors, kobzari, by producing memorable performances on the world stage.

    http://www.bandura.org/history.htm

    The history of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus can be traced directly to the 12th Archeological Congress in Kharkiv, Ukraine, in 1902. The question of forming a professional orchestra of bandurists was first presented here by Hnat Khotkevych, a prominent writer, ethnographer, and composer. He provided stimulus for a renewed interest and remarkable growth in the bandura's popularity at the beginning of the 20th century, and amateur bandura ensembles rapidly formed throughout the country.

    The first professional bandurist chorus was formed in Kyiv in 1918 during the height of the country's brief period of independence. Under the direction of bandura virtuoso Vasyl Yemetz, the first chorus initially had 15 members. Another such chorus, in Poltava, Ukraine, was formed in 1925 under the direction of Volodymyr Kabachok.

    The mid-1920s were marked by a period of resurgence of Ukrainian arts and culture, and the Chorus developed into a professional touring troupe. As the Chorus membership, expertise, and repertoire were continually refined and enhanced, the bandura was transformed from a folk to a classical concert form.

    The Chorus' history rapidly evolved into a turbulent one. The ideals of the bandurist - God, truth, freedom, and human dignity heralded through song - were a threat to the then-newly formed Soviet Union. Under Joseph Stalin's rule, artists and intellectuals were arrested, exiled or executed in an attempt to eradicate every remnant of Ukrainian culture.

    Hnat Khotkevych was executed in 1938 in Kharkiv and his compositions were banned throughout the Soviet Union. Many conductors, chorus members, and blind bandurists-minstrels were also accused of enticing the populace to nationalism and were executed. In 1935 the remaining members were forced to reorganize into the State Bandurist Chorus of the Ukrainian SSR.

    In the years that followed the Chorus was exploited and persecuted by both the Soviets and the Nazis. It was not until 1949 that through the assistance of allied forces many of the Chorus' members immigrated from refugee camps to the United States where many established a home base in Detroit, Michigan.

    Freedom was a great blessing but not without its difficulties. Most of the members, in order to support their families, had to learn new skills that were often unrelated to their musical ability and experience. Approximately 90 percent joined Detroit's automotive industry labor force. This, however, did not prevent the bandurists from launching a series of concerts in their newly adopted homeland. The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus was reborn.

    Hryhory Kytasty, (1907-1984), long-standing conductor of the Chorus was a driving force in re-instilling Ukrainian choral and bandura art in North America. Considered a legend in his own time, this composer, conductor, performer, and teacher was a role model and inspiration to young bandurists. He continued the legacy of the bandurist (also known as a kobzar) and furthered the art of the bandura in the free world.

    Today, the majority of Chorus members are 2nd and 3rd generation Americans and Canadians. Fortified by a whole new generation of young musicians, the Chorus has captivated audiences in major concert halls in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Australia for more than 50 years. The Chorus has performed for such noted personalities as former President Richard Nixon, former President Ronald Reagan, movie star Jack Palance, and former President of Ukraine Leonid Kravchuk.

    In June 1991, under the directorship of Wolodymyr Kolesnyk, the Chorus completed a historically triumphant 14-city tour throughout major cities of Ukraine. The performances, which encompassed traditional ballads and instrumentals, were received with great enthusiasm and rave reviews, especially in areas of Ukraine where national consciousness had been most dormant.

    As a tribute to its role in preserving and perpetuating the legacy of Ukrainian music, the Chorus was selected by Ukraine's Council of Ministers as the recipient of the Taras Shevchenko Ukrainian State Prize, the highest award that can be bestowed for excellence in the contribution to the arts. The award was presented to the Chorus by Leonid Kravchuk, then president of Ukraine, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during his first visit to America in May 1992.

    The Chorus returned to Ukraine again in 1994, touring the russified regions of southern Ukraine and Crimea. The Chorus' current artistic director, Oleh Mahlay, had his conducting debut as the assistant conductor during this tour.

    During the 1999-2000 season, the Chorus celebrated its 50th Anniversary in North America. During its half-century in North America the Chorus produced a prodigious 26 albums, nine cassettes and six CDs. Most recently, the Chorus presented a series of Sacred Music Concerts to various communities in North America. In August of 2001, the Chorus had the distinct honor of representing the United States in Kyiv during Ukraine's 10th Anniversary of Independence
    Celebration. Click here to view these and other recordings.

    Most recently, the Chorus returned to Europe as part of its 85th anniversary concert season. While in Europe, the Chorus performed in Manchester and London, England; Paris, Strasbourg, and Saint Avold, France; Munich and Regensburg, Germany; and Vienna, Austria. One of the many historical highlights of the Chorus' tour was a special performance in the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris on July 1, 2003. The tour culminated two years worth of artistic and administrative work in celebration of the Chorus' 85th anniversary.

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    Post Re: Traditional European music

    Very nice pieces of folk music.
    Here is a wedding song from Thrace,where you can hear the Greek bagpipes (Gaita)

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