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Thread: Phenotypes in Northern Italy

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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    What surnames are Southern Italian and which ones Northern Italian?
    http://gens.labo.net/it/cognomi/genera.html (to take with "benefit of inventory")

    Santaniello (from around Naples?), Cardinalli, Apreda, Giancarlo, Ricci (really common in Southern Italy) Rughetti, Valletta, Fatinelli, Rugeri, Di Vicenzo, Vacarezza, Pricitelli, Romano (really common too) Gaetani, Sanguinetti, De Micelli (Calabria?), Mazarello, Durante looks definitely Southern Italian
    Ricci and Romano are pan-italian.

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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by Gesta Bellica
    ok.. Repetto (really common in Genoa and Liguria), Fenoglio, Fabbris (both from Piedmont? some other Skadi member can be more accurate), Merello, Frisone, Brusoni, Dal Colleto, Dello Staffolo (the latter 2 seems Venetan) looks from Northern Italy.


    Zampini, Buzzi, Brunetti and Martinelli are quite uncertain, they can be from everywhere in Italy

    Landini and Fabiani look like Central Italian

    Santaniello (from around Naples?), Cardinalli, Apreda, Giancarlo, Ricci (really common in Southern Italy) Rughetti, Valletta, Fatinelli, Rugeri, Di Vicenzo, Vacarezza, Pricitelli, Romano (really common too) Gaetani, Sanguinetti, De Micelli (Calabria?), Mazarello, Durante looks definitely Southern Italian

    Great dates! Really, I post some surnames of people I know, and now I know better their origins. Tho they all live together and peacefully in Buenos Aires. . Without division lol, even when Buenos AIres is a litlle more North Italian. What about Brunetti is quite uncertain but what about Brunetto? and Frisone?


    Ferrari is most common in north-central Italy, excluded ?iedmont where Ferrero takes its place.. the southern variant is Ferrara. The ethimology of this family name is the same as the english "Smith".

    Ferrari and Ferrero are way common in Argentina, and now I know why. Many people came from Piedmont. Smith is an incredibly common name in UK, and even here where the English immigration wasn't too large, you can find a couple of hundreds in the telephonic guide of your city.

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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by dazed&confused
    http://gens.labo.net/it/cognomi/genera.html (to take with "benefit of inventory")


    Ricci and Romano are pan-italian.
    hmm sorry but i beg to differ..
    Now they look pan-italian but mostly because of internal migrations.
    if you search Russo in that website you will have the same situation but Russo is the southern Italian version for Rossi..now it's widespread also in the North expecially in Lombardy but there's now way that one of them was there prior to 1945

    "E tutti si scandalizzano quando sentono dire: quel tale tipo di mammifero o di uccello ormai Ŕ sparito dalla faccia della terra, non lo vedremo pi¨; Ŕ una grave perdita. Certo, si tratta di gravissime perdite.
    Ma non sarebbe forse pi¨ grave se sparisse una comunitÓ umana?? --Bruno Salvadori

    Seven pictures of northern European males and seven pictures of northern African males were presented randomly via a computer screen to 82 Italian female undergraduates of the University of Padua, Italy.
    Each picture depicted a full frontal face with a neutral facial expression. Participants were asked to classify each picture as either northern Italian or southern Italian.
    On average, the seven pictures depicting northern Europeans were classified as northern Italians 81% of the time. The seven pictures depicting northern Africans were classified as southern Italians 83%
    of the time.



  4. #64
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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by Here
    Great dates! Really, I post some surnames of people I know, and now I know better their origins. Tho they all live together and peacefully in Buenos Aires. . Without division lol, even when Buenos AIres is a litlle more North Italian. What about Brunetti is quite uncertain but what about Brunetto? and Frisone?


    Ferrari is most common in north-central Italy, excluded ?iedmont where Ferrero takes its place.. the southern variant is Ferrara. The ethimology of this family name is the same as the english "Smith".

    Ferrari and Ferrero are way common in Argentina, and now I know why. Many people came from Piedmont. Smith is an incredibly common name in UK, and even here where the English immigration wasn't too large, you can find a couple of hundreds in the telephonic guide of your city.
    Ah i can imagine that in Buenos Aires you can find everything nowadays.. just like in Milan

    Brunetto and Frisone looks more like Northern Italian than anything else...
    Moreover many surnames are used both in the North and in the South but most common in one part of the country rather than in the other..

    Another interesting thing is that some surnames sound similar to some dialect words, that's a good proof of their origins.

    "E tutti si scandalizzano quando sentono dire: quel tale tipo di mammifero o di uccello ormai Ŕ sparito dalla faccia della terra, non lo vedremo pi¨; Ŕ una grave perdita. Certo, si tratta di gravissime perdite.
    Ma non sarebbe forse pi¨ grave se sparisse una comunitÓ umana?? --Bruno Salvadori

    Seven pictures of northern European males and seven pictures of northern African males were presented randomly via a computer screen to 82 Italian female undergraduates of the University of Padua, Italy.
    Each picture depicted a full frontal face with a neutral facial expression. Participants were asked to classify each picture as either northern Italian or southern Italian.
    On average, the seven pictures depicting northern Europeans were classified as northern Italians 81% of the time. The seven pictures depicting northern Africans were classified as southern Italians 83%
    of the time.



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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Now they look pan-italian but mostly because of internal migrations.
    Sergio Romano isn't southern for sure. In his biography he describes accurately his family tree and he doesn't mention any southern roots.
    Ricci appears to be too common in Emilia, low Piedmont and Lombardy not to be "non autochthonous" in those places.
    I guess there are even some 'Russo' among indigenous northern surnames

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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by Gesta Bellica
    Hey guy, i was writing harsh words about the situation in (Northern) Brazil but if the South looks like that i would really love to come back in your country...
    Can you suggest me some cities where people are in the biggest majority of European heritage?

    Thanx
    Ahh, but northern Brazil is indeed a terrible place! As a matter of fact, Brazil is not even a country, it's more like a poor and ridiculous imperium, with many countries inside of it (the dark vast north, the light deep south, f.e.).

    Well, I live in the biggest city of the venetian colonies here, called Caxias do Sul (500.000 inhabitants and perhaps some 400.000 venets). Until the 80's 90% of the city was completely venetian, but now we have a lot of migration from mongrel zones and... well... you know what happens.

    Cities you must visit here: Gramado, Canela, Nova Petrˇpolis, Montauri (became famous because their census was "100% white" and the children didn't speak portuguese, but Talian dialect), Veranˇpolis, Nova Milano, Nova Padova, Nova Trento, Nova Bassano, Nova Roma, Garibaldi and Carlos Barbosa. I had a friend from Padova who came to these cities and he told me "he felt in home".

    http://www.carlosbarbosa.rs.gov.br/f..._orquestra.jpg <-- a random pic from the Carlos Barbosa orchestra. Look the people's faces.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jńger
    I don't doubt there can be people like these, I just think calling them typical was a bit far fetched, as far as it goes for northern italy at least.
    Maybe some selected regions?
    Anyway, it contradicts my experience, I would like to read some more though
    I agree, my post seemed to show some irreal stuff, but didn't showed. I can post here pics from other people here, and they will look near like that anyway. South Brazil it's a region that for many years (since 1875) "italians" just married "italians", and this works like a guarantee about the 'purity' of the people here (well... that time Italy was nothing more than an idea). There wasn't southern italian immigration to south Brazil (zero, none, nothing, not-even-a-couple), and these folks, isolated in the mountains and in the countryside, preserved very well their (our) integral heritage.

    It's clearly different from the italian-americans, for example, tooooo much different.


    Don't Worry, Be Herac


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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by dazed&confused
    Sergio Romano isn't southern for sure. In his biography he describes accurately his family tree and he doesn't mention any southern roots.
    Ricci appears to be too common in Emilia, low Piedmont and Lombardy not to be "non autochthonous" in those places.
    I guess there are even some 'Russo' among indigenous northern surnames
    Everything is possible, but surely Romano and Russo are typically from southern Italy.
    Romano is a typical family name around Naples and other southern part, all the people with such a surname had origins from there.

    Exceptions can always exist..but you never know too much about them
    I had a co-worker in Milano with a clearly southern Italian surname (Orlando) but she claimed that all her 4 grandparents were Milanese..i was really curious so i asked more infos and after some talks she admitted that one of his ancestors came to Milano around the 1600' from Aversa..then almost 400 years ago, but still doesn't make her family name less southern..

    I become really suspicious when a surname appears really common around Milano/Torino and in the south too..usually it indicates that it cames up North with the post WWII migrations

    "E tutti si scandalizzano quando sentono dire: quel tale tipo di mammifero o di uccello ormai Ŕ sparito dalla faccia della terra, non lo vedremo pi¨; Ŕ una grave perdita. Certo, si tratta di gravissime perdite.
    Ma non sarebbe forse pi¨ grave se sparisse una comunitÓ umana?? --Bruno Salvadori

    Seven pictures of northern European males and seven pictures of northern African males were presented randomly via a computer screen to 82 Italian female undergraduates of the University of Padua, Italy.
    Each picture depicted a full frontal face with a neutral facial expression. Participants were asked to classify each picture as either northern Italian or southern Italian.
    On average, the seven pictures depicting northern Europeans were classified as northern Italians 81% of the time. The seven pictures depicting northern Africans were classified as southern Italians 83%
    of the time.



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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by Herac
    Ahh, but northern Brazil is indeed a terrible place! As a matter of fact, Brazil is not even a country, it's more like a poor and ridiculous imperium, with many countries inside of it (the dark vast north, the light deep south, f.e.).

    Well, I live in the biggest city of the venetian colonies here, called Caxias do Sul (500.000 inhabitants and perhaps some 400.000 venets). Until the 80's 90% of the city was completely venetian, but now we have a lot of migration from mongrel zones and... well... you know what happens.

    Cities you must visit here: Gramado, Canela, Nova Petrˇpolis, Montauri (became famous because their census was "100% white" and the children didn't speak portuguese, but Talian dialect), Veranˇpolis, Nova Milano, Nova Padova, Nova Trento, Nova Bassano, Nova Roma, Garibaldi and Carlos Barbosa. I had a friend from Padova who came to these cities and he told me "he felt in home".

    http://www.carlosbarbosa.rs.gov.br/f..._orquestra.jpg <-- a random pic from the Carlos Barbosa orchestra. Look the people's faces.
    Impressive photo.. looks like it was taken in Veneto indeed

    Thanx for the precious infos..
    I would really love to visit such places.. and what about Florianopolis and Blumenau? Are they any decent or now they are degenerated too??

    "E tutti si scandalizzano quando sentono dire: quel tale tipo di mammifero o di uccello ormai Ŕ sparito dalla faccia della terra, non lo vedremo pi¨; Ŕ una grave perdita. Certo, si tratta di gravissime perdite.
    Ma non sarebbe forse pi¨ grave se sparisse una comunitÓ umana?? --Bruno Salvadori

    Seven pictures of northern European males and seven pictures of northern African males were presented randomly via a computer screen to 82 Italian female undergraduates of the University of Padua, Italy.
    Each picture depicted a full frontal face with a neutral facial expression. Participants were asked to classify each picture as either northern Italian or southern Italian.
    On average, the seven pictures depicting northern Europeans were classified as northern Italians 81% of the time. The seven pictures depicting northern Africans were classified as southern Italians 83%
    of the time.



  9. #69
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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Everything is possible, but surely Romano and Russo are typically from southern Italy.
    Romano is a typical family name around Naples and other southern part, all the people with such a surname had origins from there.

    Exceptions can always exist..but you never know too much about them
    I had a co-worker in Milano with a clearly southern Italian surname (Orlando) but she claimed that all her 4 grandparents were Milanese..i was really curious so i asked more infos and after some talks she admitted that one of his ancestors came to Milano around the 1600' from Aversa..then almost 400 years ago, but still doesn't make her family name less southern..

    I become really suspicious when a surname appears really common around Milano/Torino and in the south too..usually it indicates that it cames up North with the post WWII migrations
    in a probabilistic approach that's right. but casistics always contemplate exceptions.
    my neighbour is 'Platino', which appears to be Sardinian but he has no memory of sardinian ancestry. It's way more probable his original surname was 'Platini' (rather common here) and his forefathers screwed it.
    A surname might originate in a certain area in a very restricted number and at the same time might originate in a whole different area but in a very larger quantity. that does not imply the two surnames are someway related. May be the exception that confirms the rule, but anyway
    exceptions are still possible.

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    Re: Phenotypical elements in North-Italy :

    Quote Originally Posted by Gesta Bellica
    Impressive photo.. looks like it was taken in Veneto indeed

    Thanx for the precious infos..
    I would really love to visit such places.. and what about Florianopolis and Blumenau? Are they any decent or now they are degenerated too??


    Blumenau is a good and german city. There's a huge and famous Oktoberfest there. Florianopolis has beautiful beaches and nature - the city is good also. It was founded by people from the Ašores' island, it's an universitarian and touristic island, so there you can find all kinds of people (including all kinds of euros).

    An advice: if you want to visit a tropical place and find decent people, don't go to northern Brazil.


    Don't Worry, Be Herac


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