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Thread: Donauschwaben: Swabians in the Danube Valley

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    Interesting, thanks for the info. We have the Landsmannschaft der Donauschwaben e.V. (Territorial Association of the Danube Swabians) in Germany. There's a description of the banner on fotw too:

    Jens Pattke reported in the German vexillology mailing list about the flag of one of the Landsmannschaften (territorial or country associations) of Vertriebene (refugees from former German territories or formerly German-inhabited regions in Eastern Europe). He explained that the Landsmannschaften of the Sathmar Swabians, the Banat Swabians and the Danube Swabians share the same coat-of-arms, which shows the German imperial eagle, a blue wavy fess representing the river Danube and the fortress of Temeschburg (Temesvar / Timisoara) with six towers representing the six main Danube-Swabian districts:

    • Central Hungarian Highlands
    • Swabian Turkey
    • Slavonia-Syrmia
    • Batschka
    • Banat
    • Sathmar


    The fortress stands on the fertile farmland made arable and productive by the Danube Swabians and is flanked by the Islamic crescent and by the sun, a symbol for Christian faith and at the same time for Prince Eugene of Savoy (Prinz Eugen). The coat-of-arms was proposed in 1950 by Hans Diplich. The Danube Swabians place it on a plain white hanging flag.
    http://www.fahnenversand.de/fotw/flags/de%7Dlm_ds.html



    This is the banner of the Landsmannschaft der Banater Schwaben e.V. (Territorial Association of the Banat Swabians) from Germany.


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    Senior Member Annikaspapa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainman View Post
    Like I bet if you joined that Swabian society and told the members you only date people of Germanic heritage they would probably call you a racist and ask you to leave. The whole thing is superficial.
    I read this and had to smile. I'm familiar with a number of Donauschwaben individuals and organizations - on both sides of the Atlantic. It has always been a bit of an inside joke/point of wonder amongst others in my social circle that - at the very least - the particular group I'm most acquainted with (in the US), has a pattern of forming relationships with (and marrying), almost exclusively, other Schwobs. This still seems prevalent among the first and second generation of American born offspring of the post-war immigrant Donauschwaben. It can be a bit amusing trying to follow the web of relationships as A's cousin marries B's sister, who has a cousin that is the granddaughter of A's uncle H - the brother of K, that's wed to B's grandmother, that... A small collection of surnames is enough to cover all the multitude of Schwobs in North America.


    Quote Originally Posted by rainman View Post
    But I see nothing of value in these groups or celebrations. Anybody can find an exuse to get drunk or dress up in some costume but we really need people that take the preservation of the culture and people more seriously. Which is hard because most groups that have any interest in such are irrational hate groups that do more to destroy the folk than to help them.
    I'm not familiar enough with the Cincinnati Donauschwaben, or their involvement with Cincinnati's (civic, I presume) Oktoberfest to pass judgment, but I can assure you that if any group of latter 20th century "German" immigrants to the States has made a serious effort to preserve their cultural heritage and traditions, it is the Danube Swabians.
    "Nur der ist seiner Ahnen wert, der ihre Sitten treu verehrt"

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    My father is a Donauschwabe. He was born in Osiek(that at a time was more then half german) in eastern Croatia while both his parents families had lived a little north of it in southern Hungary. Both Croatian(or Hungarian) and German were their mother tongues. My father's family moved to Speyer in south-western Germany(an area from wich a lot of Donauschwaben originally hailed from) in 1957.

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    A Discussion on Danube Swabians


    Our talks on war-torn issues of the Jaffna Peninsula digressed into various issues of Stuttgart in Germany, which was a home for Turks and other minorities.

    In recent years, the German-speaking countries of Europe have been confronted with demographic changes due to decades of immigration. These changes have led to renewed debates in Germany about who should be considered German. Turks, Italians, Greeks, and people from the Balkans in southeast Europe form the largest single group of non-ethnic Germans in the country.

    In addition to the non-ethnic Germans, traditionally considered ethnic Germans also form a significant portion of the immigrant population. The ethnic Germans are foreign-born and often retain the cultural identities and languages of their native countries in addition to being Germans. The repatriation provisions made for this group of Germans are unique and have a historical basis, since these were areas where their ancestors traditionally lived.

    Danube Swabians and Volga Germans are the major group of these ethnic Germans who immigrated or were forcibly sent back to Germany from their adopted lands by their ancestors several centuries ago.

    The Danube Swabians (Donauschwaben) is a collective term for Germans who lived in the former Kingdom of Hungary, especially in the Danube River valley. Because of varying development within the territory settled, the Danube Swabians cannot be seen as a unified people. They include the Germans of Hungary (Ungarndeutsche), Satu Mare Swabians, the Banat Swabians (Banater Schwaben), and the Danube Swabians in Serbia's Vojvodina (Wojwodinedeutsche).

    The Carpathian Germans and Transylvanian Saxons are not included within the Danube Swabian group.

    Danube Swabians had an interesting history of origin. Beginning in the 12th century, German merchants and miners began to settle in the Kingdom of Hungary at the invitation of the Hungarian monarchy. Although there were significant colonies of Carpathian Germans in the Spis mountains and Transylvanian Saxons in Transylvania, German settlement throughout the rest of the kingdom had not been extensive until this time.

    During the 17th-18th centuries, warfare between the Habsburg Monarchy and the Ottoman Empire devastated and depopulated much of the lands of the valley, referred geographically as the Pannonian plain. The Habsburgs ruling of Austria and Hungary at that time resettled the land with people of various ethnicities including Magyars, Slovaks, Croats, Serbs, Romanians, Ukrainians, and Germans.

    The German settlers came at this time from Swabia, Hesse, Franconia, Bavaria, Austria, and Alsace-Lorraine. However, despite their origin, they were all referred to as Swabians.

    The first wave of resettlement came as the Ottoman Turks were gradually being forced back after their defeat at the Battle of Vienna in 1683. The settlement was encouraged by the nobility whose lands had been devastated through warfare, and by military officers including Prince Eugene of Savoy and Claudius Mercy.

    Many Germans settled in the Bakony (Bakonywald) and Vértes (Schildgebirge) mountains north and west of Lake Balaton (Plattensee), as well as around the town Buda (Ofen), now part of Budapest. The area of heaviest German colonization during this period was in the Swabian Turkey (Schwabische Turkei), a triangular region between the Danube River, Lake Balaton, and the Drava (Drau) River. Other areas settled during this time by Germans were Pécs (Fünfkirchen), Satu Mare (Sathmar), and south of Mukachevo (Munkatsch).

    After the Banat area of Central Europe was annexed from the Ottomans by the Habsburgs in the Treaty of Passarowitz (1718), plans were made to resettle the region, which became known as the Banat of Temesvar (Temeschwar / Temeschburg), as well as the Backa (Batschka) region between the Danube and Tisza (Theiss) rivers.

    Fledgling settlements were destroyed during another Austrian-Turkish war (1737-1739), but extensive colonization continued after the suspension of hostilities. The resettlement was accomplished through private and state initiatives.

    After Maria Theresa of Austria assumed the throne as Queen of Hungary in 1740, she encouraged vigorous colonization on crown lands, especially between Timisoara and the Tisza. The land steadily rejuvenated: marshes near the Danube and the Tisza were drained, farms were rebuilt, and roads and canals were constructed. Many Danube Swabians served on Austria's Military Frontier (Militargrenze) against the Ottomans. Between 1740 and 1790 more than 100,000 Germans immigrated to the Kingdom of Hungary.

    The Napoleonic Wars ended the large-scale movement of Germans to the Hungarian lands, although the colonial population grew steadily and was self-sustaining.

    Small daughter-colonies developed in Slovenia and Bosnia.

    After the creation of Austria-Hungary in 1867, Hungary established a policy of Magyarization whereby minorities, including the Danube Swabians, were induced by political and economic means to adopt the Magyar language and culture.

    http://ezinearticles.com/?German-Mem...ians&id=562028


    Die Sonne scheint noch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leichtweis View Post
    My father is a Donauschwabe. He was born in Osiek(that at a time was more then half german) in eastern Croatia while both his parents families had lived a little north of it in southern Hungary. Both Croatian(or Hungarian) and German were their mother tongues. My father's family moved to Speyer in south-western Germany(an area from wich a lot of Donauschwaben originally hailed from) in 1957.
    My maternal grandmother hailed from Osijek (in German 'Esseg').

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    An educational video:



    A documentary about the Danube Swabians who moved to the territory of Vojvodina in the eighteenth century. The story follows their destiny from the very beginnings of settlement in this region, through the position during the Second World War until the present time. The film tells the story of Maria, the girl who is descendant of Danube Swabians. She comes in Vojvodina to find the old house of her grandfather, who was exiled after the War. There she meets a local guy Miso who helps her in it. Together they travel throughout Vojvodina meeting witnesses of traumatic post-war events who have survived the communist camps. That's how they discover completely new facts about Danube Swabians that have been hidden from the public for decades.



    Some pictures:







    "Traditional Danube Swabian Costume" circa 1935



    Painting:



    1900s Banat:



    Banat Swabians:

    (on the right):



















    Sathmar Swabians, they are among the few Danube Swabians who descend from Swabians proper (in Romania, Saxons and Swabians has a different meaning from Germany):










  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Siebenbürgerin For This Useful Post:


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