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Thread: Black serial killer targets white women -- will be set free early!

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    Post Black serial killer targets white women -- will be set free early!

    Coral Eugene Watts in a recent prison photo.


    Some victims


    [Why hasn't someone personally hunted him down? We've become cowardly weaklings. The old KKK took care of things like this.]

    He's a wood shop machinist at the Ellis Unit in Huntsville, his oversized hands and muscular arms as brawny as the day in 1982 when he first entered a Texas prison, as powerful as the day he last choked a woman to death.
    By some accounts, Coral Eugene Watts has murdered more than 50 women, roaming from Michigan to Canada, Indiana, Tennessee and, finally, Texas. He started young, at age 15 worming his way into a woman's apartment to attack her with his bare hands. In response to what he learned about his victims' behavior and police attempts to catch him, Watts, like a malevolent virus, evolved. He stabbed, he slashed, he strangled, he hanged and he drowned, each victim chosen at random, his only explanation, "She had evil eyes."

    Though barely literate, Watts is profoundly street-smart. He's also bold, sometimes stalking his prey right under the noses of police, then slaying his victims without leaving a trace of physical evidence. Driven by an inexorable lust for blood, Watts sometimes attacked two women in one day. Only moments after he stabbed Anna Ledet, a 34-year-old Dallas woman attending medical school in Galveston, he attempted to slash another woman to death. She escaped because Watts' hands were slippery with Ledet's blood.

    Though he never raped or robbed, Watts often took a personal token from his victims--a shirt, jewelry, pants or a purse--then burned them or threw them in a sewer. It wasn't enough to take a woman's life, Watts said. He had to "kill her spirit."

    His lawyer in Houston, where Watts is known to have killed 10 women, began wearing a crucifix while she was around her client. "There's something evil in the man," Zinetta Burney told a reporter. "He never threatened me. He was always quiet and polite to me, but he scared me more than anyone I've ever dealt with."

    Since he was a teen, with the help of his parents, psychiatrists, attorneys and judges, Watts learned to manipulate the system. And at every turn, he's been phenomenally lucky, as if some prince of evil is watching over him, guiding his deeds and blinding those who would bring him to justice. One dawn in 1982, Watts was digging a grave in a vacant Houston lot for a victim he'd just drowned in a water-filled flower pot when a couple appeared and seemed to look right at him. Somehow, they walked by without seeing the corpse on the ground or asking Watts what the hell he was doing.

    Watts' luck held even after he got caught. Though one of the most prolific serial killers in history, Watts has never been convicted of murder. In 1982, after his arrest in Houston while fleeing from the place where he attacked two young women, a lack of evidence--and desperation to get Watts off the streets through any means--led the Harris County district attorney to offer the killer an unusual deal. Watts agreed to plead guilty to "burglary with intent to commit murder" in return for a sentence of 60 years. Granted immunity, Watts then confessed to 13 murders, five attempted murders and one assault. He offered to confess to 22 murders in Michigan as well as crimes in several other states, but authorities in those jurisdictions refused to grant him immunity. He responded by clamming up.

    The Houston deal was controversial, but the families of Watts' victims were confident that the state would keep him locked away until his prime killing years were past--that he'd serve at least two-thirds of his sentence before being paroled, making him at least 70 when released.

    Their confidence was misplaced.

    When the victims' families gathered last summer for a 20th memorial of Watts' conviction, the ripple effects of his vicious crimes were still vivid as grieving parents, spouses and siblings spoke of lost loved ones. Dallas resident Laura Allen, mother of the murdered Anna Ledet, mentioned the need to forgive. But Joe Tilley of Arlington, whose daughter Linda was Watts' first Texas victim, seemed to sum up the feelings of just about everyone else:

    "Forgiveness cannot be bestowed when forgiveness is not sought," said the white-haired Tilley, gripping the lectern. "This is a confrontation with pure evil, with principalities and the powers of the air."

    And evil is trying to break out. From the moment he stepped behind those penitentiary walls at 28, Watts has worked diligently to gain his freedom. At the memorial, the families were shocked to learn that Watts, still in his prime, will be released soon after serving only one-third of his sentence. The price for his crimes: He will have served less than two years for each woman he's confessed to slaying.

    Thanks to a statute on the books when he was convicted, a series of lucky breaks and inaction by Governor Rick Perry's office, Watts is scheduled for release on May 9, 2006. If he gets out, Texas will become the first state ever to legally release a known serial killer from prison.

    For the past 21 years, Watts, now 49, has anticipated that day. He's maintained such a low profile, refusing all media requests for interviews--he declined to speak to the Dallas Observer--that despite his atrocious record, Watts' name has never taken its place in the creepy pantheon of celebrity occupied by serial killers such as John Wayne Gacy (33 victims), Ted Bundy (confessed to 40 murders) and Jeffrey Dahmer (13 victims).

    Watts has given clear warning of what he plans to do when he gets out. On a stifling hot day in August 1982, the killer sat in a squad car with Houston homicide Detective Tom Ladd as they drove to an unmarked grave where one victim was buried. He'd deliberately chosen Ladd to hear his confessions.

    "Aren't you glad it's over--that you got it off your conscience?" Ladd asked him.

    "You know," Watts said quietly, as if chatting with an old friend, "if I ever get out, I'm going to do it again."

    Retracing Watts' life, with access to psychiatric records, internal police reports and transcripts and audiotapes of his confessions, it's clear that he was telling the truth. And it's clear that, in 2006, Coral Eugene Watts will be very hard to stop.

    Genesis of Evil

    The first mistake people make when discussing Coral Eugene Watts is to see his choice of victims as haphazard, his behavior as inexplicable, says Dr. Harley Stock, a forensic psychologist who has evaluated about 800 criminals convicted of murder and sex crimes. In 1980, Stock, while living in Michigan, became involved in the search for a killer dubbed the "Sunday Morning Slasher," who was eventually identified as Watts.

    "Watts has a fantasy in his mind of the victim that is brewing there," says Stock, now in private practice in Florida. Though Watts didn't rape his victims, Stock believes the attacks were sexually motivated. "Then he goes out and seeks someone who matches that fantasy. He killed within a certain age range, within a certain look. Maybe they were the kind of women he wanted but could never get."

    Though he's known to have killed two black women and one Hispanic woman, Watts' victims were almost exclusively attractive young white women, often with long hair. They were never obese and rarely older than 40. [Almost exclusively white, yet we hear no indication of a hate crime, no accusation of racism... now, what if a white male has killed 47 black women? It would be mentioned on the news every single day for infinity ]

    "These events seem to be spontaneous and unprovoked, but they are very well-planned," says Stock, who has interviewed Watts in prison. "When he goes after someone, he gets as much enjoyment in stalking the victim as he does in killing the person. He enjoys the physical sensation of having the power over life and death." But Watts' varied methods of killing make him an anomaly in the world of serial killers. "He was looking for new ways to make people squirm before they died," Stock says. "He was looking for new ways to get enjoyment, and he wanted to thwart the police."

    His race also makes him an oddity. "A black serial killer is very rare [they usually get caught that's why, lol] , less than 1 percent," Stock says. "In young black males, the incidence of violent crimes is very high, but not serial killings. It's essentially a white male crime." [Yet the most prolific serial killer on record is Hispanic, and Watts beats out many of the famous white serial killers, and of course our newest serial killer is the black sniper]

    Though diagnosed by one psychiatrist as a paranoid schizophrenic, Stock dismisses that out of hand. "The hallmark of schizophrenia is disorganized thinking," Stock says. "Watts was too bold, too smart, too self-assured. These killings were very well-executed, logical and coherent."

    The likelihood of Watts' rehabilitation "approaches zero," Stock says. "It's a lifelong behavior that will not change. Even among the 800 murderers I've seen, what stood out with this guy was his total, absolute disregard for human life."

    "Wicked Behavior"

    The craving started early. As he reached puberty, it invaded his dreams. He began nurturing it, stroking it, taking immense pleasure in it. His urge to kill a woman first erupted in the murder of a family acquaintance, or so he later told Houston police. He said he didn't remember the slaying until mourners told him she was dead.

    He was born Carl Eugene Watts at Fort Hood, Texas, on November 7, 1953, to Richard and Dorothy Watts. Dorothy was 18; Richard was a private in the Army a few years her senior. Three days after his birth, the couple left Texas for Coalwood, West Virginia, where both grew up. The son knew little of his father; Richard and Dorothy divorced in 1955 when Carl and his sister Sharon were toddlers. At some point, Carl started using the name Coral--the way he pronounced his name in his soft Southern drawl. A "mama's boy," he also spent a lot of time with his grandmother, who would later tell Houston Chronicle reporter Evan Moore that as a child Watts loved to hunt and skin rabbits.

    A few years later, Dorothy Watts moved to Detroit, with Coral remaining behind with his grandmother for a while. In 1962, Dorothy married Norman Ceaser, a mechanic. They had two more children.

    As a teen-ager in the '60s, Watts seemed promising: an athlete and Golden Gloves boxer, soft-spoken and polite. But a childhood bout with meningitis had forced him to repeat third grade; from then on, he struggled in school. His mother blamed his poor memory and learning problems on the meningitis-induced high fever. But Watts could remember certain things extremely well.

    He first came to the attention of police as a 15-year-old paperboy, when the cravings broke through into daylight. On June 25, 1969, Watts attacked Joan Gave, 26, while delivering papers in her Detroit apartment building. At 7:30 a.m., Watts, large and muscular for his age, knocked on the woman's door. When Gave answered, Watts tried to throttle her. She screamed and Watts ran, though he later returned and finished delivering his papers. Arrested four days later, Watts said with a shrug, "I just felt like beating someone up."

    In September 1969, at his lawyer's advice, Watts checked into the Lafayette Mental Clinic in Detroit. Watts denied he was there for any particular reason and seemed unconcerned about his predicament. Evaluated by Dr. Gary M. Ainsworth, Watts said he'd become sexually active at 14 but appeared to have little interest in girls, equating sex with "wicked behavior."

    Watts' parents seemed perplexed. "The patient's mother appeared wearing a wig and a rather tight sweater," Ainsworth reported, "and stated that she could offer no reason why her son would act the way he did and furthermore that he has never given them indication of this kind of behavior before."

    But quiet Coral was a bully. Dorothy Ceaser mentioned that her 11-year-old daughter was "spoiled." Both mother and son complained that the girl cried all the time. "However," Ainsworth wrote, "it is apparent that what they mean by this is that this sibling cries only when the patient provokes her."

    The psychiatrist's conclusion: "Coral is an impulsive individual who has a passive-aggressive orientation to life. There is no evidence of psychosis in the examination, although there [is] some confusion in thinking when the situation becomes overly complex."

    Ainsworth's final report was startling and prescient: "This patient is a paranoid young man who is struggling for control of strong homicidal impulses. His behavior controls are faulty, and there is a high potential for violent acting out. This individual is considered dangerous."

    The prescription: regular outpatient treatment.

    Released November 7, 1969, the day he turned 16, Watts had discovered an amazing truth: He could take refuge in the mental health system whenever his bizarre behavior got out of hand. Whenever, that is, he got caught. And one of the most confounding things about Watts is that he was caught many times.

    "Is Charles Here?"

    Wearing a miniskirt and platform shoes, Gloria Steele, 19, lay sprawled on her back in the apartment, eyes open and lifeless. As police in Kalamazoo, Michigan, examined the crime scene on October 30, 1974, friends sat on the couch crying hysterically. African-American and the mother of a 3-year-old girl, Steele had been stabbed 33 times in the chest, an attack so ferocious that a piece of steel had lodged in her spine. There had been no robbery or sexual assault, and no witnesses. But Watts, now 20, would quickly become a suspect.

    In the five years since his first arrest in 1969, Watts had returned for outpatient treatment to the Lafayette clinic fewer than 10 times. He had stayed out of trouble with police during his high school years, though he often used drugs--mostly marijuana, speed and pills. Watts had few friends and felt uncomfortable talking to people, ending up in the principal's office several times because of conflicts with girls. A star player for his high school football team, Watts had trouble with academics. He finally graduated at 19 with his mother's tutoring.

    By this time, Dorothy Ceaser was teaching art and wood carving in the Detroit Public Schools. To outsiders, Coral seemed close to his mother, though he later told a psychiatrist that his mother "beat him, hollered at him, didn't act as if she liked him and several times struck him with a switch about the face. He also did not have a good relationship with his stepfather, who he states was quite mean when not drunk." (Questioned by a reporter, Watts' stepbrother would later deny any abuse took place. Dorothy and Norman Ceaser declined to be interviewed for this story.)

    In 1973, Watts enrolled in Lane College, a black school in Jackson, Tennessee, on a football scholarship. A football injury during his first semester cut his tenure short. Back in Detroit, Watts worked about six months until he was accepted at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo under a special program that provided scholarships and mentoring for black students who didn't otherwise qualify for admission.

    In June 1974, Watts moved into a WMU dorm room with two other men and signed up for 12 hours. But academics didn't seem to interest him. Moody and frustrated, he made no effort to stay in contact with his tutor. Instead of going to classes, he played pingpong, watched TV and stoked his rage.

    A few months before enrolling at WMU, Watts had visited the Lafayette clinic, indicating that his problems were "the same as before." A psychological evaluation of Watts done at that time concluded: "This individual is struggling with conflicts in the area of sexuality and sexual identity. Homosexual concerns may be present. Rejection and denial are being unsuccessfully employed, and more primitive thoughts and fantasies threaten to break through." A note made at the clinic indicated Watts had a "strong impulse to beat up women."

    At WMU there were plenty of targets. But no one at the Detroit clinic contacted police, and everything Watts told doctors was confidential.

    Like a shark, Watts began trolling campus apartment complexes. On October 25, 1974, Lenore Knizacky, 23, reported that a black man had rapped on her door in the morning and asked, "Is Charles in?" Told that no one by that name lived there, the man asked to leave a note, but when he stepped inside he grabbed Knizacky and tried to strangle her. At one point, he put his hand on her crotch, but he gave up and left when Knizacky screamed and fought.

    Five days later, Steele was murdered. A woman who lived in Steele's complex told detectives that she'd walked down her stairs and passed a black man walking up that same day. While she watched, the man knocked on her door. She yelled to ask what he wanted. "I'm looking for Charles," the man said.

    Continue

    I love this one - "Two slayings in one night; audacious for sure, but again Watts got lucky. Two witnesses who glimpsed the hooded killer said he looked white. Police found no link to Watts."
    Last edited by Nordhammer; Monday, July 7th, 2003 at 02:58 AM.

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    Senior Member Stríbog's Avatar
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    White "conservative" Texans are so full of sh*t. They brag about how Texas is so tough on crime, especially murderers, and then turn scum like this loose. I don't need to go into the details of the double standard present at every level of legislative and judicial judisdiction, not to mention media.
    I don't think mob violence like lynching is on the whole conducive to civil society or rule of law. I believe in due process WHEN THE PROCESS IS FAIR AND RIGHT. In the United States, something has been very, very wrong with the law as understood and practiced in this country, probably since the Civil War.
    I don't casually use this smiley, but it's more than justified in this case. The bastard should hang or fry.


    :behead

    :negro

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    Originally posted by Stríbog
    I don't think mob violence like lynching is on the whole conducive to civil society or rule of law. I believe in due process WHEN THE PROCESS IS FAIR AND RIGHT.

    I don't casually use this smiley, but it's more than justified in this case. The bastard should hang or fry.


    :behead

    :negro
    You want due process if this animal killed your wife? Me... oh no, I'd personally hunt him down. I'm way too vengeful to let the law spank him on the wrist. It would be personal.

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    Who was it that said "Law should be reason, free from emotion"?
    I understand the urge for immediate extralegal justice, but it sets a dangerous precedent. You may exercise good judgment regarding when to take the law into your own hands, but how can you be sure that others will?

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    Originally posted by Stríbog
    Who was it that said "Law should be reason, free from emotion"?
    I understand the urge for immediate extralegal justice, but it sets a dangerous precedent. You may exercise good judgment regarding when to take the law into your own hands, but how can you be sure that others will?
    Let me say this. Do you need a tribunal of Judeo-idiots to tell you to defend yourself before you defend yourself from someone trying to kill you? Do you need a similar group of people to judge someone who you have seen kill your wife? Of course, if you have no idea who did it, you can't act on it. I agree, the reason is used to ascertain who did it and possibly why, etc. The emotion is used to inflict the reasoned justice.

    If someone murders someone I love and I see them do it or am confident it was them by evidence, etc, he/she will pay in kind.

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    My goodness, these legal systems are fucked up, and you have Capital Punishment in America? 47 Women killed? And the beast is still alive and will be released? Execute him upon the the second murder, just to be more sure he is the actual murderer. Such criminals forfeit their right to live.

    Justice is made when the community is safe and does not have to incur the costs of its safety due to social deviants and assorted criminals.

    Obviously my main concern would be if we actually would get the right person, that is my only concern regarding the death penalty. If we have the right person, then go ahead and remove him from society, we do not need such subhumans (and I did not say this because the guy above is black, I am relating to his behaviour).

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    http://www.murdervictims.com/watts.htm

    Coral Eugene Watts murdered at least 13 women but went to prison only for aggravated burglary; someday he'll get out

    By EVAN MOORE
    Houston Chronicle

    Published Sunday 4/7/91

    He was 12 when the dreams started.

    Killing women, always killing. He'd jump and twitch, punch their evil spirits with the practiced fluency of a boxer, twist and writhe until he fell from the bed. Sometimes he'd awaken and crawl back to the sheets, back to the arms of the dreams. More often he'd spend the night on the floor, never leaving their embrace.

    They weren't nightmares. He enjoyed them.

    Eventually, the dreams seeped into reality. He watched women, stalked them, looked for their evil eyes. Impulse gave birth to action, and by age 15 he had begun hitting, stomping, choking them.

    He never raped, and he rarely mutilated. The satisfaction came from the hunt and the attack. Besides, he liked things neat and clean. Ultimately, it wasn't enough to hurt them. He had to kill. Over the years he strangled, stabbed, drowned and even hanged.

    No one knows exactly how many. By his own count it's close to 100.

    Today, Coral Eugene Watts is 38 and an inmate serving a 60-year sentence in the Clements unit of the Texas prison system, near Amarillo. Despite his admission of killing 13 women, 10 of those in Houston, Watts is in prison not for murder, but for burglary. He may be the nation's only known black serial killer and perhaps the most prolific killer in custody today.

    He is the only one who is going to get out.

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    Originally posted by Nordhammer
    http://www.murdervictims.com/watts.htm

    Coral Eugene Watts murdered at least 13 women but went to prison only for aggravated burglary; someday he'll get out

    By EVAN MOORE
    Houston Chronicle

    Published Sunday 4/7/91

    He was 12 when the dreams started.

    Killing women, always killing. He'd jump and twitch, punch their evil spirits with the practiced fluency of a boxer, twist and writhe until he fell from the bed. Sometimes he'd awaken and crawl back to the sheets, back to the arms of the dreams. More often he'd spend the night on the floor, never leaving their embrace.

    They weren't nightmares. He enjoyed them.

    Eventually, the dreams seeped into reality. He watched women, stalked them, looked for their evil eyes. Impulse gave birth to action, and by age 15 he had begun hitting, stomping, choking them.

    He never raped, and he rarely mutilated. The satisfaction came from the hunt and the attack. Besides, he liked things neat and clean. Ultimately, it wasn't enough to hurt them. He had to kill. Over the years he strangled, stabbed, drowned and even hanged.

    No one knows exactly how many. By his own count it's close to 100.

    Today, Coral Eugene Watts is 38 and an inmate serving a 60-year sentence in the Clements unit of the Texas prison system, near Amarillo. Despite his admission of killing 13 women, 10 of those in Houston, Watts is in prison not for murder, but for burglary. He may be the nation's only known black serial killer and perhaps the most prolific killer in custody today.

    He is the only one who is going to get out.

    Not the nations only black seriel killer.
    Derick Todd Lee, who was just arrested last month in my area is the suspect of the murders of several white women around the LSU campus going back for years. He is now in state custody.

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