View Poll Results: Dos honor have a reasonable, valid basis?

Voters
62. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes. The feeling of exclusivity and posession is necessary for the homan mind somehow.

    58 93.55%
  • No. It is largely the product of rules of a certain society, obsession and prejudice. It is dispensable and counterproductive.

    4 6.45%
Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 51

Thread: History and Decline of Honour

  1. #1
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post History and Decline of Honour

    The history of honour, identity in informal legal practice

    (The Mediterranean, 12th - 20th cent.)

    Koper, October 1999

    In almost every European language the term honour contains a basic significatory duality. An individual's honour is one hand linked to his virtuous behaviour, to his ability to accept values and behaviours that can be incorporated in un unwritten code of mental and general culture of a certain social circle. On the other hand, the concept of an individual's honour is closely linked with the group to which he belongs, with social hierarchy which denotes his role and function - honour, therefore, which relates to ethical as well as moral values, and to the standards which define the group to which the individual belongs.

    Such distinction (or such indistinctness) makes us ponder about the historical development of honour, particularly about relationship between honour and nature and the characteristics of the institutional, political and religious systems, the duty of which was to legalise, in different ways and with different intensity, the legitimacy of the differences in people's status and property, as well as to settle disputes in connection with the definition of honourable behaviour itself.

    It is clear, therefore, that the approach to the subject of honour must by many-sided, for honour is not supposed to be merely a social language, which regulates behaviour and stipulates the roles and hierarchies, but also a hardly tangible sphere of disputes in which institutional and family relations have been repeatedly formed and in which the extents of the sacred and secular have tried to interpret the existing reality in a number of different ways. With the historical-legal turning point, most characteristic of which were codes and the beginning of the so-called century of the middle-class, this complexity disappears, although only seemingly, since that fairly widespread and obstinate pluralism, which followed the seeming uniformity of the Code, still stipulated, for quite some time, the rural society, which was often imbued with values that are normally understood under the notion of honour. Interaction between state and the Church, however, has been for some time still an expression of certainly not negligible role (especially in the sensitive sphere of weddings) which the language of honour played also in the economically and politically most important spheres of society in the 19th century and later.

    At the symposium dedicated to the question of honour, different subjects and questions are to be broached more or less directly. Preference will be given, as much as possible, to the interdisciplinary approach and historical aspects, which will enable a revaluation of the traditionally autoreferential spheres of study. By considering heuristic complexity of the language of honour, the symposium should focus on more or less basic questions, while the aim of separate academic days should be to deal with as many subjects as possible as well as with their direct linking.

    1. The central subject of honour is to be first of all approached by the definition (historical, anthropological, judicial) of the notion of honour itself; it is to be understood mainly in its ethical connotation or in the connotation of values which denote the identity of a certain community (in the widest sense of the term) and individuals in it. These values could be termed universal, for they are accepted by community as a whole, in spite of the changes in status and class. They usually concern the specificity of male and female sexes and the complexity if their interactions. What then stipulates male and female honour, which ethical parameters are characteristic of behaviour of both sexes, which are the elements that reinstate certain relationship between them, and which are the elements that create the context in which they are theoretically joined into unicum equipped with ethically positive and virtuous symbols and contents?
    2. Honour is claimed by all social classes. Authority or power is in the controversial sphere of honour formed as a right. Montesquieu did not assert merely by chance that the societies ruled by a monarch were similar to the societies guided by the secret mechanisms of honour. The atmosphere of the implicit sacrality, which was virtually imbued with royal power, provided the ruler with a privilege of undisputed honour. It was no different as far as noblemen were concerned; they demanded such comprehension of honour, which derived directly from their status and privileges. The characteristics that stipulated above all the notion of male honour (such as courage, pretension to privilege, nobleness by blood and name) were inseparable from the comprehension of the status of the privileged nobility. These aspects are most obvious, where the controversial but permanent link between the monarch and the nobility was expressed with the equalisation between honour and honourable titles given by the ruler, which became particularly evident from the 17th century onwards, when a true competition began for honourable titles (often without any connection with direct implementation of the political power).
    3. Subjects and questions to be breached during the first two sessions are very difficult to distinguish, at least in their major guidelines, from clearly contrasting relations between state and the Church, and from the numerous disputes that flared up during the Middle and Modern Ages between the Church authority and the temporal power.
    4. The language of honour represented the most important expression of society, most characteristic of which have for quite some time been legal pluralism and a distinct tendency towards informal settling of disputes. Development of administrative and legal systems of new state formations contributed, however, more to a weakening than to the total suppression of these characteristics.
    With the period of codification's, the legal pluralism (prevalent in societies where preserved by tradition and identity) assumed the form of subcultures, which in spite of their no doubt inferior position to some extent succeeded in having an effect on the writing of codes.

    And thus the language of honour began its slow and unstoppable decline, during which it gradually limited itself to the increasingly peripheral spheres. In the end it was completely ousted by mass media and urbanisation. Its expressions of survival, however, are in fact merely a faint reflection of culture, which for centuries played the role of a true informal legal system.

    http://www.zrs-kp.si/konferenca/onore_en.htm

  2. #2
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post Honour replaced by the law of the State

    Honor, usually spelt honour outside the United States of America, comprises an indivual's reputation, self-perception or moral identity. Previously honor figured largely as a guiding principle of society, functioning as part of a code of honor[?] for a gentleman and often coming to expression in the practice of duelling. One's honor, that of one's wife, of one's (blood-)family or of one's beloved formed an all-important issues, but the concept appears to have declined in importance in the modern secular West. Popular stereotypes would have it surviving more definitively in alleged "hot-blooded" Mediterranean cultures (Italian, Arab, Hispanic ...) or in more "gentlemanly" societies (like the "Old South" of Dixie). It lingers in the military (officers may conduct a court of honor[?]) and in organisations with military echoes, such as Scouting.



    "Honor" in the case of females historically related frequently to sexuality: preservation of "honor" equated primarily to maintenance of virginity, or at least to preservation of exclusive monogamy. One could speculate that feminism may have changed some linguistic usage in this respect. Cultures of honor can be contrasted with cultures of law. From the viewpoint of anthropology, cultures of honor are associated with nomadic peoples and herdsmen who carried their most valuable property with them and were likely to have it stolen, without any greater government to have recourse to. In this situation, it is better to be feared than liked; and cultivating a reputation for swift and disproportionate revenge increases the safety of your person and property. The mindset needed for a culture of honor has been remarked upon by thinkers ranging from Montesquieu to Steven Pinker.

    Cultures of honor are therefore associated with Bedouins, with Scottish and English herdsmen of the Border country, and many similar peoples, who have little allegiance to a nationalgovernment; with cowboys, frontiersmen, and ranchers of the American West, where law enforcement was often out of reach, as famously celebrated in Western movies; and with aristocrats, who enjoy hereditaryprivileges[?] that put them beyond the reach of general laws. Cultures of honor also flourish in criminal underworlds and gangs, whose members carry large amounts of cash and contraband and cannot complain to the law if it is stolen. The encouragement of violent cultures of honor is one of the drawbacks of legislation that creates victimless crimes. Once a culture of honor exists, it is difficult for its members to make the transition to a culture of law; this requires that people become willing to back down and refuse to immediately retaliate, and from the viewpoint of the culture of honor this is a weak and unwise act.

    Excerpt from http://www.wordlookup.net/ho/honour.html

  3. #3
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post Code of Honour, C18

    Accordingly, National Socialists will strive to be honourable and act honourably in all that they do. Of course, this is an ideal and would be difficult to achieve even in better social conditions than exist in the decadent societies of the System today. What is important above all though is that this ideal exists and is aspired to: only in this way can the excellence of the National Socialist spirit be forged.What this means on a practical level is that each National Socialist will set themself standards - of behaviour, dress, conduct and so on - and then strive to attain and maintain those standards.This means that each National Socialist will also not compromise on those standards: we will not accomodate ourselves to the many and varied forms of decadence and degeneracy that exist today. Most importantly, our honour means that we will not undertake - to further the cause or otherwise - any acts or actions which are dishonourable.

    True National Socialists will already possess an instinctive sense of honour and will instinctively know what is right, even if they cannot express it in words. In the same way, someone who does not already possess this instinct for what is honourable and noble cannot be or hope to become a National Socialist.

    Excerpt from http://www.skrewdriver.net/honourcode.html

  4. #4
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post Bushido

    The Japanese code of honour, the Bushido, is of interest here, since it differs not much from the old Western code of chivalry, and since it is easy to read up on it.

    Bushido (Japanese "way of the warrior", bushidō), was the warrior code of the samurai. Bushido was a strict code that demanded loyalty, devotion, and honor to the death. Under Bushido, if a samurai failed to uphold his honor he could regain it by performing seppuku (ritual suicide).

    Bushido is an internally-consistent ethical code. In its purest form, it demands of its practitioners that they look effectively backward at the present from the moment of their own death, as if they were already, in effect, dead. This is particularly true of the earlier forms of Bushido or budo. Of later forms, traditionalists would scoff, "they reason with staying alive kept clearly in mind."

    There are seven virtues associated with Bushido:

    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery;...=7ulb882sa3q3n?

    Hagakure onlineversion: http://www.blackmask.com/olbooks/hagakuredex.htm
    (selections from The Way of the Samurai, by 18th Century former Samurai Hagakure)

  5. #5
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post Chivalry

    chivalry (shĭv'əlrē) , system of ethical ideals that arose from feudalism and had its highest development in the 12th and 13th cent. Chivalric ethics originated chiefly in France and Spain and spread rapidly to the rest of the Continent and to England. They represented a fusion of Christian and military concepts of morality and still form the basis of gentlemanly conduct. Noble youths became pages in the castles of other nobles at the age of 7; at 14 they trained as squires in the service of knights, learning horsemanship and military techniques, and were themselves knighted, usually at 21.

    The chief chivalric virtues were piety, honor, valor, courtesy, chastity, and loyalty. The knight's loyalty was due to the spiritual master, God; to the temporal master, the suzerain; and to the mistress of the heart, his sworn love. Love, in the chivalrous sense, was largely platonic; as a rule, only a virgin or another man's wife could be the chosen object of chivalrous love. With the cult of the Virgin Mary, the relegation of noblewomen to a pedestal reached its highest expression.

    The ideal of militant knighthood was greatly enhanced by the Crusades. The monastic orders of knighthood, the Knights Templars and the Knights Hospitalers, produced soldiers sworn to uphold the Christian ideal. Besides the battlefield, the tournament was the chief arena in which the virtues of chivalry could be proved. The code of chivalrous conduct was worked out with great subtlety in the courts of love that flourished in France and in Flanders. There the most arduous questions of love and honor were argued before the noble ladies who presided (see courtly love). The French military hero Pierre Terrail, seigneur de Bayard, was said to be the last embodiment of the ideals of chivalry.

    In practice, chivalric conduct was never free from corruption, increasingly evident in the later Middle Ages. Courtly love often deteriorated into promiscuity and adultery and pious militance into barbarous warfare. Moreover, the chivalric duties were not owed to those outside the bounds of feudal obligation. The outward trappings of chivalry and knighthood declined in the 15th cent., by which time wars were fought for victory and individual valor was irrelevant. Artificial orders of chivalry, such as the Order of the Golden Fleece (1423), were created by rulers to promote loyalty; tournaments became ritualized, costly, and comparatively bloodless; the traditions of knighthood became obsolete.

    Medieval secular literature was primarily concerned with knighthood and chivalry. Two masterpieces of this literature are the Chanson de Roland (c.1098; see Roland) and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (see Pearl, The). Arthurian legend and the chansons de geste furnished bases for many later romances and epics. The work of Chrétien de Troyes and the Roman de la Rose also had tremendous influence on European literature. The endless chivalrous and pastoral romances, still widely read in the 16th cent., were satirized by Cervantes in Don Quixote. In the 19th cent., however, the romantic movement brought about a revival of chivalrous ideals and literature.

    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?...y&gwp=8&curtab

  6. #6
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post Culture of Shame and Culture of Guilt

    A common distinction in the social sciences is that between guilt and shame cultures. I find this of interest when dealing with the Germanic and European concept of honour, since it is in no small way based on guilt more than shame. Probably to the extent where it is based in biological traits, and not only culture. At the same time, I suspect that with the onslaught of modern massmedia, politically correct witchhunts and commercialism, we are moving in the direction of a shame culture instead. This is probably a bad thing, since guilt morality is based on an inner code of morals, while shame morality is dependent on what other people will think (and since honour and race has no importance at all in current society, people driven by shame will not care for them at all). A good article on the area is the below:






    http://www.doceo.co.uk/background/shame_guilt.htm
















  7. #7
    Senior Member Oskorei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, December 14th, 2008 @ 06:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Subrace
    Tydal/Litorid/Nordid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Location
    Gothenburrah
    Gender
    Politics
    Identitär
    Religion
    Indo-europeisk Traditionalist
    Posts
    2,172
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Post Re: Culture of Shame and Culture of Guilt

    Some topics for discussion could be the following:

    - What is your personal code of honour (if any)?

    - Why is honour as a concept dying in modern society?

    - Is this a good or bad thing?

    - What is honour? The texts in the thread only deal with the expressions of honour, but what is it?

    - Or any other topic deemed important or interesting.

  8. #8
    Account Inactive Huzar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 11th, 2008 @ 10:35 PM
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Gender
    Politics
    Paganist
    Posts
    2,485
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    4
    Thanked in
    4 Posts

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Oskorei
    chivalry (shĭv'əlrē) , system of ethical ideals that arose from feudalism and had its highest development in the 12th and 13th cent. Chivalric ethics originated chiefly in France and Spain and spread rapidly to the rest of the Continent and to England. They represented a fusion of Christian and military concepts of morality and still form the basis of gentlemanly conduct. Noble youths became pages in the castles of other nobles at the age of 7; at 14 they trained as squires in the service of knights, learning horsemanship and military techniques, and were themselves knighted, usually at 21.

    The chief chivalric virtues were piety, honor, valor, courtesy, chastity, and loyalty. The knight's loyalty was due to the spiritual master, God; to the temporal master, the suzerain; and to the mistress of the heart, his sworn love. Love, in the chivalrous sense, was largely platonic; as a rule, only a virgin or another man's wife could be the chosen object of chivalrous love. With the cult of the Virgin Mary, the relegation of noblewomen to a pedestal reached its highest expression.

    The ideal of militant knighthood was greatly enhanced by the Crusades. The monastic orders of knighthood, the Knights Templars and the Knights Hospitalers, produced soldiers sworn to uphold the Christian ideal. Besides the battlefield, the tournament was the chief arena in which the virtues of chivalry could be proved. The code of chivalrous conduct was worked out with great subtlety in the courts of love that flourished in France and in Flanders. There the most arduous questions of love and honor were argued before the noble ladies who presided (see courtly love). The French military hero Pierre Terrail, seigneur de Bayard, was said to be the last embodiment of the ideals of chivalry.



    Medieval secular literature was primarily concerned with knighthood and chivalry. Two masterpieces of this literature are the Chanson de Roland (c.1098; see Roland) and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (see Pearl, The). Arthurian legend and the chansons de geste furnished bases for many later romances and epics. The work of Chrétien de Troyes and the Roman de la Rose also had tremendous influence on European literature. The endless chivalrous and pastoral romances, still widely read in the 16th cent., were satirized by Cervantes in Don Quixote. In the 19th cent., however, the romantic movement brought about a revival of chivalrous ideals and literature.

    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?...y&gwp=8&curtab
    Very interesting. I studied medieval history. it's a facinating age of Europe, more than many think ; Knights are one of the best expressions of hindo european worrior-spirit, pervaded by an higher stat of spiritual evolution. Surely a symbol of white history in the complex. The three principal orders (Teutonics, Templars,Hospitalers) constituted entire armies, for their countries, their "holy causes" and their own objectives of power. During my literature studies i've read some parts of masterpieces you cite;these, are the examples of the two MAIN literal tendencies of medieval age :the "Carolingian current", based on strenght, pure honor/duty, indifference in front of death, fear, and pain (typical germanic derivation about values and context) ;the "Chanson de Roland" is manifestation of this. The second, is the "Briton current", charachterized by a strong romantic influence; here, Knight brave spirit, is mixed with a human passion typical of Celtic and Latin culture, whom creates stories related to intense love, intense hate and other violent passions unusual to north european tradition. The invincible hero of nordic sagas, becomes an ambiguous lover who tries to preserve his honor code insted his overvhelming sentiments. However, the contrapposition between spirituality, duty, faith ,honor(trascendental values) and human, materialistic reality, is a distinctive traits of all medieval psychology.

    [QUOTE=Oskorei].

    Bushido (Japanese "way of the warrior", bushidō), was the warrior code of the samurai. Bushido was a strict code that demanded loyalty, devotion, and honor to the death. Under Bushido, if a samurai failed to uphold his honor he could regain it by performing seppuku (ritual suicide).

    Bushido is an internally-consistent ethical code. In its purest form, it demands of its practitioners that they look effectively backward at the present from the moment of their own death, as if they were already, in effect, dead. This is particularly true of the earlier forms of Bushido or budo. Of later forms, traditionalists would scoff, "they reason with staying alive kept clearly in mind."

    There are seven virtues associated with Bushido:
    QUOTE]

    I loved Samurai Spirit, too. Their code reseambles western Crusaders surely.
    I read years ago a modern critic of Hagakure by famous writer Yukio Mishima. He substantially elaborated all this series of ancient values, adfirming their actuality today in some ways. Of course, to be duty to this way of life it's necessary an higher mental condition ;surely very few people of actual society has the intrinsic will to adapt themselves to it.

    For last thing, if i can do an observation, japanese honor code differs from western honor code in a subtle phylosophical/religious sense : while knights honor concept is strongly cohesed with moral pragmatic precepts of christianity, (for example about sex, drinking et many other things) therefore is charachterized by a clear moral background, Samurai honor concept is free from any dogmatic background: in ancient japanese religion (SHINTO) is not pragmatically organized like western judeo/chistian religions, so has a more ethical background, than moral. I mean, there is a major indifference about material world(ZEN derivation), so great, that there is a latent tendence to indifference about life (suicide is admitted) and personal acts (sex is not a crime). Japanese honor code, projects itself on a higher sphere of spiritual condition and knowledge (i suppose).
    Last edited by Huzar; Thursday, February 17th, 2005 at 11:39 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Lidvick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Last Online
    Monday, February 28th, 2005 @ 06:21 AM
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    Kansas , America
    Gender
    Politics
    Against Hypocrites Of Authority
    Religion
    Celtic/Druid/Shamanism
    Posts
    102
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Post Re: History and Decline of Honour

    My sentiments of honor coincides with my religous beliefs.

    In my way of living and thinking is the following,

    : honor the Gods and show absolute loyalty and compassion towards them.

    : If you have a wife or lover , love her well and be loyal to her and always be by her side.

    : Go in life strong and do not fear death for death shall knock on your door someday regardless and sometimes we do not choose when.

    : In battle or in fighting show no fear towards your enemy , and be strong to whatever may come to you no matter how terrifying it be.

    : love your kin and always be by their side. Same for your race as we all know here, love your race and do not turn your back on it.

    : I like the saying die well and die free, even though it is from a movie I still like the saying, or the saying strength and honor. I believe how we live now is how we will be judged later so we should all live well now in the time we live.

    I was watching the movie Gladiator with Russel Crowe yesterday one of my fav movies I like the part of the movie he says, " What we do now echoes in eternity."

    I believe that this is the way and thought of honor for myself I would love to hear other versions of it from people.
    Last edited by Lidvick; Friday, February 18th, 2005 at 07:25 PM.

  10. #10
    Account Inactive Huzar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 11th, 2008 @ 10:35 PM
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Gender
    Politics
    Paganist
    Posts
    2,485
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    4
    Thanked in
    4 Posts

    Post Re: History and Decline of Honour

    Quote Originally Posted by Lidvick
    : I like the saying die well and die free, even though it is from a movie I still like the saying, or the saying strength and honor. I believe how we live now is how we will be judged later so we should all live well now in the time we live.

    I was watching the movie Gladiator with Russel Crowe yesterday one of my fav movies I like the part of the movie he says, " What we do now echoes in eternity."

    I believe that this is the way and thought of honor for myself I would love to hear other versions of it from people.
    Some weeks ago i saw EXCALIBUR (john Boorman). The same emotion. Perhaps deeper. "Our moment will be again in another time". The story of a sword "forged by a god, foretold by a wizard, found by a king".
    I must cite Conan (john Milius, 1981) a dark hymn to the strenght

    "CROM......god of the stone and the steel.....when this world will be finished, nobody, neither YOU, will remember what we were in our life, because we are only dust. NO one, will know if we were good or bad human beings in our life; for what we fought, lived and for what we died. Nothing of us will survive. But one thing will survive : the spirit of our courage. And the fact that one day, few men fought against many. This is important........"

Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Which Would Gain You More Honour?
    By Thrymheim in forum Law, Ethics, & Morals
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Monday, October 6th, 2008, 10:23 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •