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Thread: Ćon Flux

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    Post Ćon Flux

    AEON FLUX IS AN ANIMATED SERIES CREATED BY PETER CHUNG WHICH FIRST AIRED ON MTV'S LIQUID TELEVISION IN 1991. THE FIRST SEASON WAS SPLIT INTO 6 SEGMENTS THAT INTRODUCED OUR MAIN CHARACTER AEON FLUX,A MONICAN AGENT, AND HER "MISSIONS" ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BORDER WALL IN THE NEIGHBORING COUNTRY OF BREGNA. AS POPULARITY OF THE SERIES GREW, THE SECOND SEASON AIRED IN 1992, THIS TIME COMPRISED OF 5 SHORT EPISODES IN WHICH AEON USUALLY [AND UNFORTUNATELY] DIED. BOTH SEASONS THUS FAR HAD VERY LITTLE [IF ANY] DIALOGUE WHICH ADDED TO THE ALREADY INTENSE IMAGERY. ACCORDING TO PETER CHUNG IN AN INTERVIEW, "I WANTED TO SEE HOW FAR I COULD GO IN TERMS OF TELLING A COMPLEX STORY WITHOUT USING DIALOGUE FOR EXPOSITION. I FIND IT HELPS YOU LOOK DEEPER INTO THE IMAGERY IF THERE'S NO DIALOGUE." [FOR THOSE OF YOU FAMILIAR WITH THESE EPISODES, AREN'T YOU DYING TO KNOW WHAT THE HELL THEY WERE PULLING UP THE SIDE OF THAT CLIFF???]

    AFTER A FEW YEARS, THE THIRD AND LAST SEASON FINALLY EMERGED IN 1995 TO UNRAVEL THE LOVE/HATE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AEON AND TREVOR GOODCHILD. THIS HAPPENED THROUGH 10 EPISODES, EACH TELLING THEIR OWN STORY, WHICH AIRED AS FULL HALF-HOUR EPISODES.
    http://www.disrecognizedspace.org/info.html
    Last edited by Frans_Jozef; Sunday, July 10th, 2005 at 09:34 PM.

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    Last edited by Frans_Jozef; Sunday, July 10th, 2005 at 09:39 PM.

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    Thong? Gravity-Defying Curls? Not Quite: A First Look At Aeon Flux
    The Lycra catsuit still brings the skin-tight sexiness that made Aeon such a fanboy favorite all those years ago.





    When "Aeon Flux" first flickered across late-night TV screens on MTV's "Liquid Television" back in 1991, the animated show was silent, violent, cryptic and kinky. Original episodes were essentially a study in two things: wanton violence (copious body
    counts and bloody shootouts aplenty) and bizarre fetishes (foot worship, long, slippery tongues and Aeon's skimpy leather outfits). Plot and continuity were not an issue. Annihilation and titillation were.

    And when you take all that into consideration, it's not hard to see why the shorts became instant cult classics. Fast-forward more than a decade, and those cultists have taken to the Internet, setting chat rooms abuzz with speculation about the live-action film version of "Flux." The biggest question, of course, has been this: What will Aeon look like?

    Now, that question has been answered.

    While some costume changes have been made (sadly, Flux's leather thong failed to make the cut), the Lycra catsuit still brings the skin-tight sexiness that made Aeon such a fanboy favorite all those years ago. And to prove that the clothes don't necessarily make the woman, Charlize Theron — who stars as the badass assassin — dyed her hair jet black and underwent months of strength training to fill Aeon's shoes.

    Fans of the original series will also notice that animated Aeon's famous, gravity-defying curls have been replaced with Theron's hip, asymmetrical 'do. Well, aside from the fact that Flux's hair could be replicated by no mortal hairstylist, screenwriter Phil Hay said that changing Flux's hair was a conscious decision.

    "Her hair was a huge challenge for us. Because everyone remembers those curls. And we wanted to have them in the film in some way, but we wanted to make them more human," he said. "And I love how it turned out. It's sexy and real, but still fantastic and animated."
    http://www.mtv.com/movies/movie/254271/moviemain.jhtml

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    Oh, my goodness! I joined lately a Aeon Flux group at Yahoo; now it happens to be the same group that I left a couple of years ago, because the discussions were leading nowhere.

    Anyway, it's bit odd to be confronted with dated scribbles when I was taking my first steps in online communities.

    aeonfluxforum
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/aeonfluxforum/

    Date: Tue Jul 24, 2001 12:05 pm
    Subject: Re: Actress (Cont.)

    Personally, I doubt that people are waiting for a
    live action movie about Aeon Flux; one might say that
    the followers of AF are a select(distinct?),
    dedicated and unconventional group of people and small in
    numbers, with a certain flair for flamboyant weirdness and
    techno-sensual aesthetics and ambiguous, keen philosophies,
    pondering and out-of-step with the world,
    phlegmatic-ironically confronting upright a chilly glare of
    moaningfulness( the atmospheric background or mood behind the AF
    stories and for cineasts surely difficult to reproduce in
    real). They aren't spoiled yet bored to see another
    tried treat on screen of their favorite series; because
    it is fairly to foresee that none of the qualities
    of this anime will be captured or retained, rather
    misinterpreted or clumsily realized.<br>Best would be that a
    series of AF movies would hit the screen.Beside Pokémon
    and the likes SF anime don't fare well in cinema,
    however a sound and intelligent script could do the trick
    on the level of the screenplay.<br>Therefore,
    there's no need for someone playing Aeon Flux, SHE is her
    best interpretator, SHE doesn't need a similacrum..
    Date: Wed Jul 25, 2001 5:17 pm
    Subject: Re: Actress (Cont.)

    With a series of AF movies i meant of course
    Animated films..<br>Years ago the French made some
    well-crafted SF animation movies(Les Maitres du Temps and
    Niourk- I think that's its title; it was although that of
    the book on which it was based, by Stephan Wul, about
    giant baldhead paedomorphic, intelligent
    extraterrestial being who have a primitive mankind as pets..);
    the same brooding atmosphere and feeling of
    displacement as in AF you'll find in those films.<br>The
    animation style of AF corresponds well with the French
    style.<br>I don't know if the French are acquainted with AF(
    was it shown on MTVFrance?), still they would surely
    relate to it.
    Awful...einfach widerlich...vreselijk!

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    Last edited by Frans_Jozef; Sunday, July 10th, 2005 at 09:40 PM.

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    The Critical Eye's interview with AF creator Peter Chung:

    http://purpleplanetmedia.com/eye/inte/pchung.shtml

    When Ćon Flux first hit the airwaves in 1991, it was as part of MTV/(Colossal) Pictures' Liquid Television, a weekly half-hour collection of animated shorts. Ask someone to name one of the one-shots on Liquid Television and they might answer with Mike McKenna's Grinning Evil Death or Yoshiaki Kawajiri's Running Man. Ask them to name one of the serials, and they'll instantly reply with Ćon Flux (also known as, "the cool one with the chick shooting everyone!")

    The brainchild of animator Peter Chung, that unnamed "chick" (later named after the series) made an unforgettable entry: armed with two futuristic guns, the futuristic Flux made mincemeat of scores of futuristic guards, using the kind of cool moves that every action/adventure movie star wishes he could do. She was beyond the standard labels of cop, secret agent, or vigilante: she was a force of nature. With the thrilling musical score playing in the background, the audience cheered as she mowed down dozens of faceless, obviously evil henchmen. Trčs cool.

    Then came the second episode: glancing only briefly at the skimpily-attired Flux, the camera focused on the scores of dead and dying henchmen. We heard their cries, their moans, their weeping and suffering. Without the thrilling music and cool moves, the scene was about as exciting as an abattoir. Chung had forced the audience to consider: was Flux really the hero? Had we been set up? Then it hits--this series has a message: don't take everything you see at face value. The old clichés don't work here. Since the series was completely without dialogue, the audience was left to figure everything out on their own.

    The series proved popular enough that, despite the character's death in Liquid Television's first season, five more shorts were ordered for the next. Chung took brought her back in five unrelated short pieces, again playing with science-fiction movie conventions and challenging the audience to try to make sense of the events in each episode by paying close attention to detail. Oh, and she died in each episode again.

    Obviously, something still clicked with the public. Ćon was given her own series of ten half-hour episodes, which started airing on MTV this fall. The same mind-bending weirdness went into the new shows, as well as one special element: now the characters could speak. Did this make things any easier to understand? Of course not. And really, would it be any fun if it did?

    Emru Townsend: You just flew in [from Korea] yesterday, right?

    Peter Chung: Yeah.

    How do you adjust to that? I mean, just out of curiosity--I assume you're going back and forth?

    Yeah, well, my living schedule is fairly irregular to begin with. I really don't have set sleeping hours.

    I guess that's lucky for you then. That just works with your job.

    Yeah.

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    Emru Townsend: If you ask me, I think a big point of Ćon Flux is to pay attention to what you're watching, and to think about it. Am I far off the mark there?

    Peter Chung: Well, that's the approach to storytelling, or filmmaking, that I was interested in using, and the story content is something else again. But that's really what I was interested in doing, because that's what interests me when I see a film, something which requires a certain amount of viewer participation.

    [Through a fluke of satellite technology, I had only seen "Utopia or Deuteronopia", the first episode of Ćon Flux's third season, without audio at the time of this interview. --Ed.]

    I liked that undercurrent of people always being watched by somebody. There's always some camera, some person, some... thing floating around just looking at people all the time. Pretty creepy, actually. I liked it. I can't wait to find out what everyone's talking about, though. [laughs]

    [laughs] Well, we were trying to play with dialogue there, because dialogue was something new to the show, obviously, and I was interested in making the dialogue somewhat mysterious. And the idea of people knowing that what they were saying was being observed, and recorded, and monitored, made them say things which weren't necessarily what they were thinking. They say things that they want other people to hear. In other words, you sort of have to interpret what people are saying, as well as what they're doing visually. So dialogue became another layer of stuff that you had to figure out.

    Is this going to be a recurring theme?

    It was really dealt with mostly in the first episode. The other episodes contain scenes of characters being observed and monitored, but it doesn't really play as much a part in the story as that one.

    Ćon Flux was one of those shorts that I found you could look at one way--you know, people can just look at it and say, "Wow! People shooting each other!"--this is in the first and second seasons, of course--but you can look at it another way, and really look at what's happening, and say, "Ah, okay!", like the one with the elevator running between five different floors. That one's great.

    Yeah, that one's my favorite.

    Yeah, I thought that one was very well handled. You sit there the first time, saying, "What? What?!" And you get the obvious joke at the end with the plug, but when you watch it a second time, you catch all the little details, you go, "Ooh, I see!" Or the one with the video camera where she goes to assassinate the guy in his house. It took me three times to watch it before I really paid attention to the time on the camera, on the videocassette, and on the clock. Then I realized, okay, this is what she's doing now, this is what happened a few minutes ago, and so on and so on. And after all that it fits together perfectly.

    Part of the idea is that... MTV runs these shows over and over again--the new shows are being run three times a week--and I'm really interested in getting repeat viewers to watch it two or three times, as opposed to seeing a repeat and saying, "Oh, I've seen that already," and turning it off. They've been designed and written in order to be... deliberately, maybe, hard to understand the first time.

    It's a delicate balance to get, because you can turn people off by confusing them, and just get them to disengage totally, which is not what I want. The strategy really is to get them to feel encouraged to pay closer attention. So far the response has been pretty good, but we'll have to see... I mean, the idea with the new series was that MTV wanted to reach more of a mass audience as opposed to sort of the cult following that the shorts had had. But I wasn't really interested in doing something formulaic in the way most shows are. I don't know if I've succeeded or not, I guess I'll find out when we see the ratings.

    How do you reconcile that sort of thing? The first season, for instance: was Ćon Flux something that was commissioned from you, was it submitted, or...

    Yeah, it was submitted, I came up with the idea, and they said, "Well, this sounds fine." And they pretty much let me do exactly what I wanted to, they really left me alone. It got good enough responses for them to consider doing the series, but it took a long time for MTV to really feel secure about ordering a full-blown half-hour show. I feel like it was based more on them noticing that people they were showing it to were responding well to it, as opposed to believing firmly in the material for its own sake. I think their commitment to the show had more to do with the idea that it was going to get good ratings as opposed to believing in the artistic interests of the show, the artistic agenda of the show.

    Do you find with the second season, which wasn't really planned the first time around, and the third season still, that you had to... I wouldn't say compromise, but either rework or rethink ideas in order to fit into what MTV was looking for?

    Well, you know, I'm fairly realistic about that kind of thing, I've worked in the animation industry for about fifteen years, and, well, the character was really designed and conceived to be appealing, to be appealing on a visceral level, so that even if you didn't understand what was going on in the story, she'd be fun and entertaining to watch...

    The skimpy outfit doesn't hurt, I suppose.

    Yeah, exactly. It's just very loaded, visually, to anyone who's even paying even a casual glance at it. And that was my strategy all along, to tell extremely abstruse and kind of bizarre stories that were fairly non-commercial, fairly personal, with a character and a surface that was very appealing and accessible. I think a great deal of the time, MTV didn't really know what it was that they were buying [laughs]. But the fact that it looked neat and was fun to watch was enough.

    Sort of like a Trojan horse, then, you get to do what you want, by sort of sneaking it in with these neato visuals everyone's going to like, regardless.

    Yeah. Well, that's part of it. Part of it I think has to do with MTV's image of themselves as being an alternative to normal network TV. I don't know if you've seen some of the other stuff that they've done recently.

    I've missed The Maxx entirely, though I'd like to see it.

    And The Brothers Grunt, and stuff like that, they're definitely off the beaten track for American commercial television. I think MTV deserves a lot of credit. I think that they've been very good to work with in terms of not meddling that much creatively. I mean, they do meddle, but all networks do, and I think that considering the norm I think that they've been very, very open-minded. I've gotten away with a lot.

    On the show itself, part of the... I guess you could call it the obvious message behind the first series... has to do to some degree with media, in terms of looking at the hero/villain relationship in movies and whatnot. That seems to be pretty clear... With the second season, with each one being a self-contained story, were you essentially trying to do the same thing, saying, Okay, here's an established convention that we have within something, say, within the action/adventure genre, and saying, well, let's mess with it a little bit here. Is that what you were going for, or were you going for a completely different tack?

    Well, the consistent thread throughout all of those shorts in the second season was that she dies in each one. And she not only dies, but she fails to accomplish what she set out to accomplish in each one. In part, it was a response to my frustration to always seeing it being taken for granted that the protagonist would succeed in what they were doing and also survive in the end, which I think makes a lot of shows or films very... well, dishonest I guess is the word. Because they play this game of putting the hero in this life-or-death situation where you know they're not going to die, but the filmmakers sort of play this game of, "Well, he could die, at any moment..."

    So I just felt, well, it would be interesting to just make that the presumption, that the character was going to die.

    So instead of the climax being, "How, against all odds, is he going to survive," it's "How, through all these odds, is the hero going to somehow manage to screw up and get killed?"

    Well, not really, no. What I was interested in doing was exploring different aspects of a character's death, and each one of the episodes was really about different aspects of death. That's what I was interested in dealing with. The elevator episode, for example, was really--to me--about how she sets out to do something, she dies in the middle of doing it, without having finished, and somebody else picks up the thread, and not understanding what she was trying to do, kind of screws things up. Sort of a nightmare scenario for anyone who's engaged in some kind of ongoing project, to think they're going to die in the middle of it without finishing it, and somebody else is going to finish it for them.

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    Emru Townsend: Fluxstylizes violence. That's part of the appeal--of the first two seasons, anyway.

    Peter Chung: It's not at all a theme of the third season shows. I don't really deal with it at all.

    Do you read anything on the Internet at all?

    I don't personally, but I've gotten some printouts from MTV, they've been monitoring that stuff, printing it out, and sending it to me.

    It's interesting that most people were complaining about the lack of violence, which I didn't see as the point. It was interesting, but I never really thought of it as the point of the show. I'm wondering how many of its fans only pick up on the surface aspects of it.

    Well, I felt it was pretty mixed, there were some people who liked the new shows, and some people who didn't. I think that a lot of people in the first place like the show for all the wrong reasons. That was part of my strategy, to get people interested in the show for different reasons. And that's fine. I think a lot of that has to do with the mental maturity of the particular viewer. When I was younger, that kind of thing appealed to me much more, but at this point in my career, I don't have that much of a desire to go back to doing that sort of stuff.

    The look of Ćon Flux is very much along the lines of Heavy Metal, other European comics, and whatnot. One thing that I've heard often from people who watch it is that it's very Japanese animation-influenced. Personally, I don't see that at all, I tend to see it more along the lines of European stuff. Which do you figure influenced the design more? Or is it just a synthesis of all the things that have been percolating in your head?

    Well, a synthesis of those two influences as well as dozens of others, including fine art references and live-action influences as well. It would be hard for me to try to analyze that myself. I'll leave that up to the viewers.

    With the way that you stylized violence in the first one, and to some degree in the second--which had less over the top violence than in the first season, but still a reasonable amount--what do you think of similar work being done in live-action, like, say, Quentin Tarantino, John Woo, stuff like that? Are you fan? Do you care? Any of the above?

    I like John Woo's films. I like some of Quentin Tarantino's films. But it's not my favorite stuff by any means at all. I actually prefer films that are more psychological and less into physical violence. I don't always go to see films for the same reasons. Movies are made for different reasons and you go to see movies for different reasons and to satisfy different urges and desires. I try not to create one scale on which to compare all films. I just don't think that's meaningful.

    I think that the fact that you're using the same medium, film, is very often fairly coincidental. What they have to do with each other, what they mean, or how good one is compared to another is really pretty meaningless.

    It's worse with animation since all sorts of things are attached to that.

    Yeah, animation is even worse, since it's loaded with so many preconceptions as to what it's supposed to be, what is good animation, what is not.

    What's some of your favorite animation? What other things to you like?

    Well, I do like a lot of Japanese animation. I like a lot of independent animation that's done for the festival circuit. There's a Russian animation director named Igor Kovalyov, I'm very fascinated by his work... he's interesting. I like a lot of the Japanese work, for different reasons. My favorite one that I've seen recently is a soap opera one called Dear Brother. It'll never get imported, I'm sure, because it's too... well, it's too Japanese, for one thing [laughs]. It's not violent at all, it's very weird, it's very perverse. It's about a girl who's in a private school, and she gets picked to be in a sorority and there's all these scandals involving incest and lesbianism. It was on NHK.

    Anything else?

    Well, the guy who made that series, Dezaki Osamu, is probably my biggest influence. He did a film called Golgo 13, that's probably what he's known for here. Although he's made so many films--he's currently working on a series called Black Jack, which is about a doctor...

    Right, based on [Osamu] Tezuka's old series.

    Right. Those are beautiful.

    Heard of them, love to see them, probably won't for a long time. [laughs]

    That's the kind of stuff that I wish they would translate into English and import, but they probably won't.

    Yeah, they don't fit into the preconceived ideas of what anime is like or can be.

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    Post Re: Aeon Flux

    Emru Townsend: There are certain bits within Ćon Flux where there's sort of a sexual undercurrent every once in a while, one of the funniest being in the first season when she's in the elevator with Trevor and, I forget the other woman that's in there, and she's watching them and she's running her gun through the little rung there. But every so often there's a little something that makes you wonder what's going on. And other times, she seems to display a somewhat sadistic side. Are these related in any way?

    Peter Chung: Well, that aspect of her was fairly vaguely defined in the first series of shorts. In the new episodes, which is really where my mind is at the moment, she's been defined in the series bible as a dominatrix. In the first episode that you saw, she receives a client who comes and gives her a pedicure and starts licking her feet...

    You've got that foot thing going again.

    That's what she does in her spare time. She receives clients and dominates them. Otherwise, the way that that works in the show is that we're not allowed to show hardcore genital penetration shots [laughs] so to get the sexual element into the show we sort of have to use a more kinky approach to sex. I mean things that wouldn't normally be sexual take on sexual innuendo. I try to come up with substitutes for sex organs. Obviously, something like a gun is a sexual symbol. But in episode three of the new shows, one of the characters has a spinal injury, in which one of her vertebrae is removed, and there's a gap in the middle of her back and it becomes a sexual orifice.

    Wow. [laughs]

    [laughs] It serves the function. It becomes a source of pleasure for her. And in episode nine, which I'm working on now, there's a group of female characters in search of these machines that are fairly phallic-shaped at the tip, [and they put them in] their belly buttons. So the belly button becomes a sexual orifice. In episode ten, the eye socket becomes a sexual orifice.

    Man. Is this in any way related to... In the "alien egg" episode in the second season, Ćon is walking around and she goes to the closet and she finds Trevor in this gear licking something. Now that, to me, looked like he was in some kind of bondage game. Is that what's supposed to be happening, or is it just far too weird for me to comprehend?

    Yeah, well, if you notice, her kitchen is lined with a lot of different cabinets.

    Oh, God. There's a different person in each one, isn't there? [laughs]

    Yeah.

    I didn't think of that. That's great.

    She's got a long list of clients.

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