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Thread: What gets you up in the morning?

  1. #11
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    Phlegethon's Avatar
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    Post AW: Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Nothing gets me up in the morning and there is nothing I desire. Life sucks and every day is the same.
    And all my youth passed by sad-hearted,
    the joy of Spring was never mine;
    Autumn blows through me dread of parting,
    and my heart dreams and longs to die.

    - Nikolaus Lenau (1802-1850)

    Real misanthropes are not found in solitude, but in the world; since it is experience of life, and not philosophy, which produces real hatred of mankind.

    - Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837)

  2. #12
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    Odin Biggles's Avatar
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    Post Re: AW: Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phlegethon
    Nothing gets me up in the morning and there is nothing I desire. Life sucks and every day is the same.
    So true but equally depressing .

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    Post Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    What gets me up in the morning is whatever I primarily resolved to do yesterday. I desire knowledge, strength and happiness.

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    Post Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Anyone suffer from Oblomovitas?


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    Post AW: Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Oblomovitas? Never heard that word before (and nor did Google, apparently).
    And all my youth passed by sad-hearted,
    the joy of Spring was never mine;
    Autumn blows through me dread of parting,
    and my heart dreams and longs to die.

    - Nikolaus Lenau (1802-1850)

    Real misanthropes are not found in solitude, but in the world; since it is experience of life, and not philosophy, which produces real hatred of mankind.

    - Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837)

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    Post AW: Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Then Jesus said, "Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke fits perfectly, and the burden I give you is light." — Matthew 11:28-30
    And all my youth passed by sad-hearted,
    the joy of Spring was never mine;
    Autumn blows through me dread of parting,
    and my heart dreams and longs to die.

    - Nikolaus Lenau (1802-1850)

    Real misanthropes are not found in solitude, but in the world; since it is experience of life, and not philosophy, which produces real hatred of mankind.

    - Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837)

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    Mistress Klaus's Avatar
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    Post Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Quote Originally Posted by TisaAnne
    I usually don't wake up in the mornings...that's nearly always when I retire to the bed. I live by my own schedule, and don't have any pressing obligations or necessary engagements that demand an early rise. But, I'm certainly not lazy...I just find that there is far more for me to accomplish after the noon hours have begun.

    Now, this is an entirely different question. What I desire from life is peace and solitude, nature and serenity, free will and independence...I've found that living during the night, as opposed to the day, provides for my needs and desires quite well.

    Are we twin sisters?...You have described my habits exactly.

    I am up early everyday...6am...trouble is...I haven't been to bed yet.
    My partner works night-shift and has influenced my sleeping patterns (even more-so...I've always been a night owl...getting up for work has always been hell)...

    The night is peaceful....most people are asleep and their chaotic thought patterns are lulled into a void (for the time being)... Enchanted tree shadows by the moon & excited cats are quite enlightening.....Everybody should experience it.

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    Post AW: Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skadi Ju87
    The night is peaceful....most people are asleep and their chaotic thought patterns are lulled into a void (for the time being)... Enchanted tree shadows by the moon & excited cats are quite enlightening.....Everybody should experience it.
    I have been one acquainted with the night.
    I have walked out in rain -- and back in rain.
    I have outwalked the furthest city light.
    I have looked down the saddest city lane.
    I have passed by the watchman on his beat
    And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain.

    I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
    When far away an interrupted cry
    Came over houses from another street,

    But not to call me back or say good-bye;
    And further still at an unearthly height,
    O luminary clock against the sky

    Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right.
    I have been one acquainted with the night.

    And all my youth passed by sad-hearted,
    the joy of Spring was never mine;
    Autumn blows through me dread of parting,
    and my heart dreams and longs to die.

    - Nikolaus Lenau (1802-1850)

    Real misanthropes are not found in solitude, but in the world; since it is experience of life, and not philosophy, which produces real hatred of mankind.

    - Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837)

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    Post Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Found this on a memblog. It is accurate, at least in regards to my understanding of Oblomovitis.

    http://matt.siys.com/index.php?p=33#more-33
    Here’s another paper I wrote for my Russian Culture class. This one is on Ivan Goncharov’s novel, Oblomov. It was written hastily, but I don’t think I left any glaring errors.

    On Oblomovitis

    In the mid Nineteenth century N. A. Dobroliubov, a Russian radical critic, posed the question, “What is Oblomovitis?” in an essay whose title is that very question. The disease that Dobroliubov refers to, oblomovitis, is said to infect the main characters of a great portion of early and mid Nineteenth century Russian fiction. The term “oblomovitis” comes from Ivan Goncharov’s novel Oblomov. Oblomov was first published in 1859—after Dobroliubov’s article was written—but part of it appeared in 1949 under the title “Oblomov’s Dream.” Oblomov is the main character of the novel, and his character is the proper point of reference for any study seeking to answer the question, “What is oblomovitis?”

    It is easy to diagnose oblomovitis. The symptoms are presented to us thoroughly in the opening pages of Oblomov. Oblomov is an incessantly sleepy person. He enjoys only sleeping, eating, and lying idly. He only has company who do not inhibit his restful pattern of life. His dust-covered, leftover-ridden room evidences his laziness as well as that of his servant, Zakhar, who seems to be equally infected with the disease. Oblomov rarely goes out. He has long since given up taking any action regarding his career, which he abandoned early on in his adult life on to take up. When he is not engaged in the aforementioned activities, he is fretting over the sorry condition of his estate. He pays no attention to the goings on at his estate or to the condition of his serfs. Consequently he receives letters telling him how poorly his serfs are performing, how little taxes will be brought in for him, and, naturally, how his income will be less than the year before. Mingled with his fretting are Oblomov’s dreams of how he will right all of these wrongs and find proper management for his estate and serfs. Of course, his dreams never materialize, and he never leaves his home. It is not out of inability, however; Oblomov is perfectly capable of acting.

    The things Oblomov desires also reveal his character. Toward the end of the novel Oblomov finds himself living in a flat, being taken care of by the flat’s owner, a young widow with children. To Oblomov, this is the ideal woman. She operates mechanically, as a perfect servant with a routine involving solely the provision of all his needs. She is a plump woman—her breasts remind Oblomov of pillows and her elbows are the object of his constant gaze whenever she is in his presence. Oblomov never loves her, yet he desires to live with and marry her. She represents the type of woman with whom he can continue his restful life unperturbed, with no violence being done to his desires.

    Oblomov’s close childhood friend in the novel is named Stolz. Stolz is a challenge for Oblomov, and it is an anomaly that two such opposite characters could ever get along. Stolz is a man of action. He is intent on working, and, indeed, Stolz considers work to be an end in itself, and not merely a means to an end. In an intense conversation with Oblomov, Stolz asks him a pressing question, “[W]hat is the ideal life, in your opinion, then? What is not Oblomovitis? (180)” Oblomov’s answer is stated as a rhetorical question, and it isolates the essence of what oblomovitis is: “Doesn’t everybody strive to achieve the very thing I dream of? Why… isn’t the whole purpose of all your rushing about, all your passions, wars, trade, and politics to attain rest—reach this ideal of a lost paradise? (180)” The essence of oblomovitis, then, is to be motivated solely by the goal of rest.

    The link between the symptoms of oblomovitis and the environment in which these symptoms are cultured is an important relationship to recognize in order to better understand oblomovitis. The most thorough description of Oblomov’s childhood is laid out in the chapter titled “Oblomov’s Dream.” Reflecting back on his childhood, Oblomov reveals the ideal world he would like to inhabit, and we see how Oblomovka is identified with this paradise.

    The first marked aspect of “Oblomov’s Dream” is how harmonious every aspect of Oblomovka, where he grew up, is. All is peaceful, nothing is disturbing. The ocean is a troubling entity for Oblomov. So are mountains, which “remind us of our frailty” (103). “And the sky over the peaks and the precipices seems so far and unattainable” (103). This is nothing at all like Oblomovka’s surroundings, where the “sky seems to hug the earth… to embrace it more tightly and lovingly.” The physical characteristics of Oblomovka give Oblomov the same peace that he derives from other aspects of that place.

    It should also be noted that Oblomov’s father is very much reminiscent of how Oblomov appears as an adult. His father sits in a chair peering out of the window all day long. He does not work, but engages in the occasional conversation with the other inhabitants of Oblomovka.

    There is a part of Oblomov’s background that contributes greatly to his state as an adult. People like Oblomov are a natural result of a system of serfdom. He is part of a class that doesn’t need to work. Oblomov has his share of serfs, let’s them labor and toil, and in the end the gains are reaped by him and little is left for the serfs. In such a scenario, one who may already be inclined to laziness is provided an outlet for endless sleep, idleness, and pleasure. There is no need to work, you can hire others to watch the serfs, and you certainly won’t be working with them. Furthermore, the serfs aren’t earned by Oblomov; they are inherited, adding to the effortlessness of acquiring and attaining of his fortune.

    Thus several factors cause of oblomovitis: The surrounding environment,—the landscape of Oblomovka—the role models one has, and the very class that one belongs to can cause one to suffer from oblomovitis.

    We know what the symptoms and causes are of oblomovitis, but we might also ask if it has a cure. On this point I am not sure. It is clear that one can at least temporarily and partially change. When Oblomov falls in love with Olga, we see a dramatic change. Olga draws him out, gets him to take frequent walks with her, go to the opera, and visit other people. However, the relationship suffers turmoil and is eventually destroyed because he does not fully change, and, at a point, he begins to revert back to his old ways of lying around in his home all day, telling Olga that he is sick. Once they have broken up, Oblomov sinks deeper and deeper until he finally dies of a stroke, due to his eating habits and his inertness. It may be that oblomovitis can be overcome, but this is doubtful because Oblomov himself was only temporarily able to change, and even this was not a complete change.

    In summary, oblomovitis’ symptoms are extreme laziness, constant fretting, and dreaming of what one will never do. The cause of this disease is the environment in which one is raised and who one looks up to. It is especially important to take into account the institution of serfdom and how those who inherit land and serfs are required to do little work. Finally, it is not likely that there is a cure for oblomovitis as Oblomov failed to recover from the disease himself.

  10. #20
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    Post Re: What gets you up in the morning?

    Fighting for my birthright.

    My birthright to be free, happy, to do as I choose since I am sovereign unto myself. To drive, to make love, to thrive. All of these are for me instinctual, part of the very essence of who I am regardless of what others around me claim, regardless of the barriers they set against me.

    Nick

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