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Thread: Albert Einstein, Plagiarist of the Century

  1. #21
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    Post Re: Einstein - Plagiarist?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Blond Beast
    De Broglie, for example, took "Planck's energy" equation and combined it with E=mc² to postulate "matter waves" -- a startling conclusion that was proven subsequently.
    yes, but he acknowledged his debt to Planck. He didn't claim to get his ideas out of the blue.



    Quote Originally Posted by The Blond Beast
    What's important is that relativity (special and general) has been proven hundreds of times subsequently, using the most advanced technologies available..
    Physicists are still trying to prove it correct or at least consistent with the three other forces. They're building right now (I don't remember where) a huge compound to detect "gravitational waves" (You mentioned them yourself). So far we have had no report of their existence, which is implied by Einstein's relativity.



    Quote Originally Posted by The Blond Beast
    I wonder what this gadfly thinks of quantum theory (QED is the most accurate theory ever put forth by man) -- which reduces existence to probability -- which not only overturned classical physics but also kicked it in the ass....
    Your language here is not really appropriate.



    Quote Originally Posted by The Blond Beast
    This bloke seems to be trying to disprove relativity simply because it may have had plagiarized origins...
    It's not my interpretation of the text. The author doesn't say relativity is true or false. He's just examining how research was carried out, and he found some flaws in the process according to scientific standard. No more no less.

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    Post Re: Einstein - Plagiarist?

    Quote Originally Posted by bocian
    ALBERT EINSTEIN
    The most recognisable equation of all time is E = mc2. It is attributed by convention to be the sole province of Albert Einstein (1905). However, the conversion of matter into energy and energy into matter was known to Sir Isaac Newton ("Gross bodies and light are convertible into one another...", 1704). The equation can be attributed to S. Tolver Preston (1875), to Jules Henri Poincaré (1900; according to Brown, 1967) and to Olinto De Pretto (1904) before Einstein. Since Einstein never correctly derived E = mc2 (Ives, 1952), there appears nothing to connect the equation with anything original by Einstein.
    As to that, I know that Philip Lenard said the equation was owed to the Austrian physicist Fritz Hasenhörl. In another context, I read the expression 'Hasenörl-Einstein equation E=Mcc'.

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    Post Re: Einstein - Plagiarist?

    So lets see, Einstein gave us what, the atom bomb? If so the Manhattan Project (Einstein as a consultant) spent a very long time figuring out how much U-235 was needed for critical mass (see Heisenberg's War), meanwhile Dr. Friedrich Lachner had already figured out a way to make a fission bomb without even knowing critical mass. So what did Einstein get us? He got us three generations of physicists who only get funded if they are involved in "basic research" in an attempt to "prove Einstein correct". There are as many prostitutes in hard science as in any red-light district.

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    Post Re: Einstein - Plagiarist?

    And Einstein is just one example of what it's all about.

    You guys have heard about the Jew Norbert Wiener, the so-called 'Father of Cybernetics'.

    What Wiener did actually was only writing two books of mashed philosophy explaining how 'his' Cybernetics was a universal revolution unheard of before (Cybernetics, or control and communication in the animal and machine 1948, and Cybernetics and Society, the Human Use of Human Beings 1950 : what a title !)

    All his ideas (feedback, systems' properties, antireductionism...) were mere reformulations of Ludwig von Bertalanffy's theoretical approach (1941)and Otto Koehler's works in biology (1939). There was nothing new in Wiener's 'revolution', not even the name, 'Cybernetics', in fact coined by the French Ampère in the 19th century (Cybernétique) !

    Do you believe that ?!

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    Post Re: Einstein - Plagiarist?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rollon
    And Einstein is just one example of what it's all about.

    You guys have heard about the Jew Norbert Wiener, the so-called 'Father of Cybernetics'.

    What Wiener did actually was only writing two books of mashed philosophy explaining how 'his' Cybernetics was a universal revolution unheard of before (Cybernetics, or control and communication in the animal and machine 1948, and Cybernetics and Society, the Human Use of Human Beings 1950 : what a title !)

    All his ideas (feedback, systems' properties, antireductionism...) were mere reformulations of Ludwig von Bertalanffy's theoretical approach (1941)and Otto Koehler's works in biology (1939). There was nothing new in Wiener's 'revolution', not even the name, 'Cybernetics', in fact coined by the French Ampère in the 19th century (Cybernétique) !

    Do you believe that ?!
    Jews are good at writting books whereby they take credit for things. It has been this way since the bible. Sometimes, I think that every Jew in the USA has written a book. Most are just plain bull-shit.

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    Einstein: Plagiarist?

    Proponents of Einstein have acted in a way that appears to corrupt the historical record. Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Time Magazine's "Person of the Century", wrote a long treatise on special relativity theory (it was actually called "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies", 1905a), without listing any references. Many of the key ideas it presented were known to Lorentz (for example, the Lorentz transformation) and Poincaré before Einstein wrote the famous 1905 paper.

    As was typical of Einstein, he did not discover theories; he merely commandeered them. He took an existing body of knowledge, picked and chose the ideas he liked, then wove them into a tale about his contribution to special relativity. This was done with the full knowledge and consent of many of his peers, such as the editors at Annalen der Physik.

    The most recognisable equation of all time is E = mc2. It is attributed by convention to be the sole province of Albert Einstein (1905). However, the conversion of matter into energy and energy into matter was known to Sir Isaac Newton ("Gross bodies and light are convertible into one another...", 1704). The equation can be attributed to S. Tolver Preston (1875), to Jules Henri Poincaré (1900; according to Brown, 1967) and to Olinto De Pretto (1904) before Einstein. Since Einstein never correctly derived E = mc2 (Ives, 1952), there appears nothing to connect the equation with anything original by Einstein.

    http://www.nexusmagazine.com/articles/einstein.html

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    Why aren't I surprised....

    I never understood how he couldn't accept his own theory and tried to alter it after the fact with his "cosmological constant"

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    Quote Originally Posted by neoclassical
    As was typical of Einstein, he did not discover theories; he merely commandeered them. He took an existing body of knowledge, picked and chose the ideas he liked, then wove them into a tale about his contribution to special relativity.
    Many physicist do this today. They often take older theories and change them around so they make more sense. For example, superstrings is a theory that was first developed over 20 years ago. But it just now is being looked at again by many physicists. Edward Witten didn't make up the theory, but he has added much to it to improve the theory and give us a better understanding of what the theory means and what it can show us.

    I'm sure Einstein used theories of other scientists, but he is the one that made the theories work. As far as if Einstein was a plagiarist or not, I would say no. However, he should have cited his sources.
    Should the subduing talisman, the Cross, break, then will come roaring forth the wild madness of the old champions, that insane Berserker rage, of which the northern poets sing. That talisman is brittle, and the day will come when it will pitifully break. The old stone gods will rise from the long-forgotten ruin and rub the dust of a thousand years from their eyes; and Thor, leaping to life with his giant hammer, will crush the Gothic cathedrals!

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    Post Re: Einstein - Plagiarist?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Solar Wolff
    Jews are good at writting books whereby they take credit for things. It has been this way since the bible.
    Do you want more examples?

    Who built the first computer in the world? I was told, again and again, that it was the American Jew John von Neumann. Then I read something about a certain Konrad Zuse, German.

    Then I went to the Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin, recently, and all became clear. The engineer Konrad Zuse was the first man to build an automatic calculator, the Z1, in 1935. In 1941, he built the first functional prototype of a modern computer, the Z3. From 1942 on, he developped the first programming system (Plancalcül), which was done by 1946.

    Among the clients of his company, Zuse-Apparatebau GmbH, was the Reich Aviation Ministry. The firma was later called Zuse KG; for years, it was the biggest company to sell computers in Europe. They sold to the USSR their first computers. In 1971, due to competition with IBM, which was heavily subsidized by the American government whereas Zuse KG was not by the BRD government, it disappeared, absorbed by Siemens.
    Last edited by Rollon; Thursday, September 15th, 2005 at 06:39 PM.

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    It's becoming clearer now, that Lorentz developed the theory of relativity & not Einstein.

    What is now called Lorentz Ether theory ("LET") has its roots in Hendrik Lorentz's "Theory of electrons", which was the final point in the development of the classical aether theories at the end of the 19th and at the beginning of the 20th century.

    Lorentz's initial theory created in 1892 and 1895 was based on a completely motionless aether. It explained the failure of the negative aether drift experiments to first order in v/c by introducing a auxiliary variable called "local time" for connecting systems at rest and in motion in the aether. In addition, the negative result of the Michelson-Morley experiment led to the introduction of the hypothesis of length contraction in 1892. However, other experiments also produced negative results and so Lorentz was forced in 1899 and 1904 to expand his theory to (nearly) all orders in v/c by introducing the Lorentz transformation, and to assume the electromagnetic nature of all forces. Guided by the principle of relativity the theory ("The New Mechanics") was further developed in 1905 by Henri Poincaré, and also by Lorentz in 1909. Poincaré corrected some mistakes of Lorentz's theory, and maintained that also non-electromagnetic forces had to be taken into account. Many aspects of Lorentz's theory were incorporated into special relativity (SR) with the works of Albert Einstein and Hermann Minkowski.

    Today LET is often treated as some sort of "Lorentzian" or "neo-Lorentzian" interpretation of special relativity. The introduction of length contraction and time dilation for all phenomena in a "preferred" frame of reference (which plays the role of Lorentz's immobile aether), leads to the complete Lorentz transformation. Because of the same mathematical formalism it is not possible to distinguish between LET and SR by experiment. However, in LET the existence of an undetectable ether is assumed and the validity of the relativity principle seems to be only coincidental, which is one reason why SR is commonly preferred over LET. Another important reason for preferring SR is that the new understanding of space and time was also fundamental for the development of general relativity.

    Full Article:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorentz_ether_theory
    This is a good example of the real problems posed by Einstein's relativity. The essence of the problem is that we really don't know what time and space are. We don't even have a very good idea of how to analyse the problem because we have preconceived ideas concerning what we mean by time and space. Einstein used the old preconceived ideas of time and space derived from Newtonian mechanics and turned them around and showed that they lead to to a new vision of what they mean. But this Einsteinian interpretation leads to absurdities that create confusion. The result is that if we hold on to the Newtonian ideas we get the bizzare conclusions of Einstein. But this is mostly due to a sleight of hand in Einsteins mathematics which is not really rigorous. He kind of patched this up and covered up the confusion in general relativity. The real problem is that when you don't have a clear idea of what is meant by time and space or space-time you get the current confusion in concepts which result from these theories.

    Another point is that I dont think Lorentz derived a time dilation in an 1895 book. What book are you citing here? I would like to look this up. My understanding is that Larmor was the first to derive a time dilation using a theory of the ether. This point is not clearly resolved for me. Most books make the incorrect claim that Einstein was the first to derive time dilation. But this is not correct.

    The basic issue is the following. Does the derived time dilation reflect a fundamental property of time,ie, that time actualy slows down? This being opposed to the view that time remains the same but that the clock used to measure time is effected by the motion so that its calibration is changed to indicate a different time. In this case the clock reads slow because the physical process by which time is measured has changed such that the clock calibration relativer to a standard clock has been changed.The answer to this question depends upon whether time is conceived as an actual physical entity or as an artifical concept invented to explain the Newtonian laws of physics.

    The anwser depends upon what you think time is. This is not at all a question which can be glibly answered as many textbooks like to do. Now of course, the same problem applies for space. We don't know what it is either.

    There are two recent books that discuss these issues. One titled "The End Of Time", and the other "Nothingness". These summarise the current research on space and time at a popular level.

    Retrieved From:http://www.metaresearch.org/msgboard...03&whichpage=5

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