Page 4 of 23 FirstFirst 12345678914 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 229

Thread: Classical Music Lovers?

  1. #31
    You are not wrong, who deem / That my days have been a dream Johannes de León's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 15th, 2012 @ 12:03 PM
    Ethnicity
    Iberian
    Subrace
    Atlanto-Baskid
    Location
    Terra Firma
    Gender
    Politics
    Nationalism
    Posts
    1,477
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Mozart and Beethoven are my favourites, however I also like Schubert, Bortniansky and Campioni.

    Including Baroque -- sometimes considered classical -- I wouls also add Bach and Vivaldi as my favourites.

    Just a small correction, both Wagner and Strauss are not from the Classical era, but from the Romantic era.
    .

  2. #32
    "Du bist das Bild, das ich in mir barg..."
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Siegmund's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 @ 11:14 PM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Gender
    Politics
    Folkish
    Posts
    1,028
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    10
    Thanked in
    10 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Johannes de León
    Mozart and Beethoven are my favourites, however I also like Schubert, Bortniansky and Campioni.

    Including Baroque -- sometimes considered classical -- I wouls also add Bach and Vivaldi as my favourites.

    Just a small correction, both Wagner and Strauss are not from the Classical era, but from the Romantic era.
    Quite right when referring to eras. However, I was using the word "classical" in its common usage to refer to the entire genre of formal European music from Renaissance times to today. Thus classical as a genre would stand in contrast to popular, military or trance, to give just a few examples.

    Of the composers you mentioned, I most enjoy Beethoven and Schubert. Do you have favorite works and recordings for these two composers?

  3. #33
    You are not wrong, who deem / That my days have been a dream Johannes de León's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 15th, 2012 @ 12:03 PM
    Ethnicity
    Iberian
    Subrace
    Atlanto-Baskid
    Location
    Terra Firma
    Gender
    Politics
    Nationalism
    Posts
    1,477
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund
    Of the composers you mentioned, I most enjoy Beethoven and Schubert. Do you have favorite works and recordings for these two composers?
    Mozart is still my favourtie amongst them all.

    From Schubert, I like most Sonatas/Sonatinas, especially Piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat major, D. 960. Also, voice and keyboard pieces are great, such as Nachtviolen, song for voice & piano, D. 752; or Originaltänze (36) for piano (Erste Walzer), D. 365 (Op. 9), his waltzes are also great.

    From Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor ("Moonlight"), Op. 27/2 is simply great. Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92; Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor ("Pathétique"), Op. 13; Variations for cello & piano in E flat major on Mozart's "Bei Männern," WoO 46 and Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor ("Appassionata"), Op. 57 are also fantastic.

    .

  4. #34
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, January 6th, 2019 @ 06:14 PM
    Ethnicity
    Aryo-Germanic
    Ancestry
    1/2 German, 3/8 English, 1/8 Welsh
    Y-DNA
    R1b
    mtDNA
    V10b
    Country
    England England
    State
    Northumberland Northumberland
    Location
    Dane Law
    Gender
    Zodiac Sign
    Scorpio
    Family
    Parent,Co-habiting
    Occupation
    Retired
    Politics
    Exposing idiocy
    Religion
    Wodenist
    Posts
    1,755
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    413
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    372
    Thanked in
    254 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund
    Are there any Wagnerophiles or Straussians out there? Or aficionados of any of the great European classical composers, conductors, orchestras and performers?

    I have a longstanding interest in European classical music as well as an extensive collection of recordings spanning all nationalities and time periods. Is there anyone with similar interests who would like to share thoughts and discoveries?
    I am a great fan of Wagner.

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 02:47 AM
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Location
    Prussian diaspora
    Gender
    Politics
    Prussian restoration
    Posts
    101
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund
    Unfortunately not.



    Hmmm. Just about everything. Might be easier for you to tell me what you like.
    That's doubtful...do you mean you like everything indiscriminately from Gregorian chants to Hans-Werner Henze??? For me to like something the composer must be driven to express himself in music...this excludes some musical genres right from the start Fortunately, there is plenty of music like that though...most of it Nordic/German

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund
    I have a longstanding interest in European classical music as well as an extensive collection of recordings spanning all nationalities and time periods.
    This does sound as if you really do like everything...my collection is much more limited in scope, and I don't have access to it right now so unfortunately I won't be able to share too much info on good performances.

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund
    Richard Strauss, his operas especially. (All of them )
    I don't really know Richard Strauss at all. Is he worth knowing? If I recall correctly he's a student of Brahms', but only his earliest works are at all reminiscent of Brahms, and his style is actually more influenced by Wagner. Am I right in that or is he more like, say, Orff? And why do you like his operas and is it worth getting to know them?

    Since you like Opera I'll recommend Friedrich Kuhlau's Elverhøj for now. Kuhlau (1786-1832) is mostly known to piano students for his sonatinas which are rather similar to Clementi's. Maybe he is most prominent for his flute music, including solo flute, flute & piano, flute & violin, and flute quartett. If you like chamber music you might as well look into that as there is a lot of good music there; however, Elverhøj is arguably Kuhlau's most enduring masterpiece. It's not an opera but rather a Romantic play, based on old Danish legends and ballads. Most of the music is based on Danish and Swedish folksongs; the orchestration is perfect, and it's a really incredibly beautiful piece of music. Kuhlau's setting of one of the melodies from Elverhøj was later adopted as the Danish national anthem This is Kuhlau; he's from Uelzen, so he's probably Saxon or Lombard (as you can see, he lost one of his eyes somehow)




    If you're interested, this link provides a brief overview of Kuhlau's life
    http://www.carolinaclassical.com/articles/kuhlau.html

  6. #36
    "Du bist das Bild, das ich in mir barg..."
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Siegmund's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 @ 11:14 PM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Gender
    Politics
    Folkish
    Posts
    1,028
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    10
    Thanked in
    10 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Johannes de León
    Mozart is still my favourtie amongst them all.

    From Schubert, I like most Sonatas/Sonatinas, especially Piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat major, D. 960. Also, voice and keyboard pieces are great, such as Nachtviolen, song for voice & piano, D. 752; or Originaltänze (36) for piano (Erste Walzer), D. 365 (Op. 9), his waltzes are also great.

    From Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor ("Moonlight"), Op. 27/2 is simply great. Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92; Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor ("Pathétique"), Op. 13; Variations for cello & piano in E flat major on Mozart's "Bei Männern," WoO 46 and Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor ("Appassionata"), Op. 57 are also fantastic.

    Unfortunately, I have never appreciated Mozart as much as Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms or Bruckner, to name only a few. I do love Mozart's Piano Sonatas, especially the recordings by Maria João Pires on DG and Claudio Arrau on Philips, as well as Mozart's Piano Concertos, but that's about it, though I've tried and tried!

    But I love Schubert's music, especially his Piano Sonatas. My favorite cycle overall is Alfred Brendel's traversal on Philips in the eighties but the most beautiful performance of the great B flat major D. 960 Sonata I've ever heard is a live recording Brendel made 1997. The 2-CD set, also on Philips, includes wonderful live performances of the D. 575, D. 894 and D. 959 Sonatas as well.

    The late Claudio Arrau played Schubert's Piano Sonatas with a unique combination of elegance and passion. If a complete Arrau cycle from the 1970s were available, I would snap it up in an instant!

    Less well known but still enchanting are Schubert's Piano Trios D. 28, D. 897, D. 898 and D. 929. They can be found on two CDs on the budget label Naxos, as can the equally wonderful Sonatas (Sonatinas) for Violin and Piano D. 384, D. 385, D. 408 along with the Fantasy D. 934. Great music to just listen to, or to have on in the background while composing something beautiful and mysterious oneself, even if only a Skadi Forum reply!

    Do you like Schubert's symphonies? With the exception of no. 8 and no. 9, they are vastly underrated and truly delightful. The box set by Karl Böhm with the BPO reissued on DG from the late 1960s and early 1970s is my favorite overall.

    The 32 Beethoven Piano Sonatas are, to me, in a special class all their own, genuine desert island music. I have several complete sets, with the Brendel (Philips, 1980s) and Arrau (Philips, 1970s) cycles at the apex of the pyramid. The Sonatas in your list are among my absolute favorites as well. For perhaps the greatest Hammerklavier-Sonate No. 29 in B flat major ever, the early 1980s Emil Gilels recording recently re-released on DG gets my vote, while my favorite recent cycle is without a doubt that of Stephen Kovacevich on EMI.

    I also especially enjoy Beethoven's Symphonies, his Piano Concertos, the Violin Concerto and his opera Fidelio. The wartime period Symphonies conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler are to me nonpareil, and chief among them is the famous BPO performance of Symphony No. 9 in March 1942, perhaps captured best on the Music and Arts label. Two other favorite Furtwängler performances of this greatest of all symphonies are his 1951 Bayreuth (EMI) and 1954 Lucerne (Music and Arts) recordings. Though in general I much prefer Karajan to Furtwängler (especially in Wagner) in the never-ending debate over who was the greater conductor, in my view Furtwängler was much better than Karajan at bringing out the neurotic, at times berserker intensity of this greatest of all composers. For an alternative to these two, Decca just reissued the outstanding Erich Kleiber recordings from the early 1950s on a budget priced 7-CD set. Terrific performances and value!

    With Fidelio one also has many choices, but my two hands-down favorites are a 1944 performance conducted by Karl Böhm with a young and gorgeous-voiced Imrgard Seefried as the Marzelline on Preiser and a 1957 performance conducted by Ferenc Fricsay also with Seefried as the Marzelline on DG. Seefried was simply incomparable!

    I have a special interest in German performances of Beethoven, Wagner and Richard Strauss from the 1933-45 era, and I have many such recordings in my collection. Favorite conductors from that period (in alphabetical order) include Hermann Abendroth, Wolfgang Brückner, Robert Heger, Oswald Kabasta, Herbert von Karajan, Richard Kraus, Clemens Krauss and Carl Leonhardt.

    The sentimental stars in my collection from this period, though not the best, are two 1938 performances of Die Walküre and Die Meistersinger from Königsberg in East Prussia. I sometimes imagine there might be a faint possibility that German relatives from Danzig could have made the relatively short trip to West Prussia for these very performances. Though Königsberg could not compete with Berlin, Vienna or even Dresden in musical culture, it did seem to have a developed German musical history and culture of its own. I've attached a favorite map (originally posted by Stríbog, I think) showing the relative locations of Danzig and Königsberg in case you're interested.

    I also have many recordings from the 1920s and even earlier, through the present day. I'm only now starting to realize how much easier it is to listen to them than to write about them!
    Last edited by Siegmund; Saturday, October 23rd, 2004 at 03:17 AM. Reason: Forgot to attach map.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Mistress Klaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, March 15th, 2012 @ 06:54 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-Australian
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Gender
    Posts
    1,040
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts

    Thumbs Up Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    I listen to classical everyday...both my own CD's & tapes and the classical radio station/s (especially when I am cooking & model building...saves me from having to change the disc's.. ).

    Bach and Beethoven are my favourites, but I also love Mozart, Wagner, Chopin, Schubert, Vivaldi, Strauss, Brahms. Superior music worthy of thorough study & influential if one is a musician.

  8. #38
    "Du bist das Bild, das ich in mir barg..."
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Siegmund's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 @ 11:14 PM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Gender
    Politics
    Folkish
    Posts
    1,028
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    10
    Thanked in
    10 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by WestPrussian
    That's doubtful...do you mean you like everything indiscriminately from Gregorian chants to Hans-Werner Henze??? For me to like something the composer must be driven to express himself in music...this excludes some musical genres right from the start Fortunately, there is plenty of music like that though...most of it Nordic/German
    Agreed on all counts except your very first statement, simply because there is so much GREAT music. Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wagner, Bruckner, Pfitzner, Schmidt and Richard Strauss are among my favorite German composers. Favorite Czech composers include Smetana, Dvořák, Janáček and Martinů. Among the Hungarians are Dohnányi, Veress, Weiner and Bartók. The Finns have Sibelius, the Danes have Carl Nielsen (as well as personal favorite Vagn Holmboe among others), the French have Massenet, the Romanians have Enescu, and the Russians have Shostakovich. It's such a big universe, so much bigger than this list, and I feel I have only just scratched the surface. Then when you consider the thousands of incredible performances that have been recorded in the past hundred years, and how they differ in fascinating, complex and beautiful ways from each other, the universe gets even bigger.

    I first came upon the genre of classical music in my family with the symphonies of Beethoven and Shostakovich. Later a friend introduced me to the music of Gustav Mahler and Bartók, and then to Schönberg, Berg and Webern, which led in turn to the Darmstadt School of Boulez, Stockhausen and Xenakis and their American counterparts Babbitt and Carter and several DOZEN more like them, both European and American - not to mention the New York School of Cage and Feldman.

    As I got older I traveled backwards in time and found much on my own that I had somehow missed or taken for granted in the mainstream of German, Scandinavian, Baltic and Slavic music, which is where I focus now.

    Along the way I have, to your point, found much music of inferior quality, at least by the standards of beauty I subscribe to today. Included in this category is much that I would consider artistic and fascinating but also unhealthy and even diseased. I would say that most of what was labeled by Rosenberg and a grumpy Dr. Goebbels as entartete Musik really IS degenerate based on its musical values. The fact that most of this beautiful sick music was composed by Jews is not surprising.

    You mentioned the well known Marxist homosexual composer Hans Werner Henze. I know his work, and it is quite intricate and beautiful, especially his chamber works on Wergo 6239-2 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 on CPO 999 322-2. But I do not play Henze often because his musical values are, to me, quite weak, the equivalent of musical masturbation. There is much flamboyant, super-talented ego at play, but little of transcendent value by my standards. But his operas are even worse: they are completely spoiled by his blatantly didactic politics, which can also be said for the vocal works of Luigi Nono and Luciano Berio. All three seem to be working as hard as they can to destroy any hope for a world based on legitimate racial, cultural and individual distinctions and instead create some version of the Marxist utopia, where they would no doubt be found among the privileged (hence bourgeois and well fed) artistic elite! Crétins, tous. But I digress.


    Quote Originally Posted by WestPrussian
    I don't really know Richard Strauss at all. Is he worth knowing? If I recall correctly he's a student of Brahms', but only his earliest works are at all reminiscent of Brahms, and his style is actually more influenced by Wagner. Am I right in that or is he more like, say, Orff? And why do you like his operas and is it worth getting to know them?
    Richard Strauss is absolutely worth knowing. He had a magnificent grasp of orchestration and an unparalleled appreciation for the beauty of the human voice. His love for the sound of the soprano voice was legendary, and most of his 15 operas feature multiple soprano parts.

    I do not know Orff, but I know Wagner and Brahms well. Strauss had, in my view, absolutely nothing in common with Brahms but did draw profound inspiration from Wagner in the scale of his artistic canvas and the colors he used to paint upon it, even if his works, unlike most of Wagner's mature operas, did not deal with serious or heroic subjects.

    One of my favorite non-operatic vocal works by Richard Strauss is his Four Last Songs, which sadly he did not live long enough to hear performed in his lifetime. I defy anyone to listen to this music late at night, with lights down and candles lit, and not cry for sheer beauty. My favorite performance is a little known version sung by Arleen Augér with André Previn and the Wiener Philharmoniker on Telarc CD-80180, followed closely by the incomparable Gundula Janowitz with Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmoniker on DG 447 422-2. Each of these budget-priced discs also includes good performances of various orchestral works by Richard Strauss. Each is a recording to treasure for a lifetime.

    Back to opera. Two of the earlier operas, Salome and Electra have a searing, berserker intensity that is as magnificent as it is astonishing. Early audiences were stuck dumb at the "barbaric" soundscape, which was a fitting counterpart to the scandalously outlandish librettos. Strauss's next opera, Der Rosenkavalier is perhaps his greatest, his most loved and most beautiful, though the subject is trivial and lighthearted. These three works, along with Ariadne auf Naxos, which is in a similar vein as Der Rosenkavalier, are by far Strauss's most popular operas. You will not go wrong with any of them.

    Among the readily available recordings I recommend the following. Each is considered a classic.
    Salome - Herbert von Karajan, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1977 (EMI 7243 5 67159 2 9)
    Salome - Erich Kleiber, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1954 (Decca 475 6087)
    Elektra - Dimitri Mitropoulos, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1957 (Orfeo C 456 972 I)
    Elektra - Karl Böhm, Staatskapelle Dresden, 1960 (DG 445 329-2)
    Der Rosenkavalier - Erich Kleiber, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1954 (Decca 289 467 111-2)
    Der Rosenkavalier - Herbert von Karajan, Philharmonia, 1956 (EMI 7243 5 67609 2 9)
    Ariadne auf Naxos - Herbert von Karajan, Philharmonia, 1954 (EMI 7243 5 67156 2 2)
    Ariadne auf Naxos - Karl Böhm, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1954 (DG 445 332-2)
    Basically, any Richard Strauss opera conducted by von Karajan or Böhm is likely to be a masterpiece. Also, note that these are older, non-digital recordings, with much higher performance values than many modern recordings. The singers, conductors and orchestras were just better.


    Quote Originally Posted by WestPrussian
    Since you like Opera I'll recommend Friedrich Kuhlau's Elverhøj for now. Kuhlau (1786-1832) is mostly known to piano students for his sonatinas which are rather similar to Clementi's. Maybe he is most prominent for his flute music, including solo flute, flute & piano, flute & violin, and flute quartett. If you like chamber music you might as well look into that as there is a lot of good music there; however, Elverhøj is arguably Kuhlau's most enduring masterpiece. It's not an opera but rather a Romantic play, based on old Danish legends and ballads. Most of the music is based on Danish and Swedish folksongs; the orchestration is perfect, and it's a really incredibly beautiful piece of music. Kuhlau's setting of one of the melodies from Elverhøj was later adopted as the Danish national anthem This is Kuhlau; he's from Uelzen, so he's probably Saxon or Lombard (as you can see, he lost one of his eyes somehow)
    Thank you so much for the recommendation! I had not previously encountered Kuhlau, as he lived just prior to my main period of interest, but I will definitely listen to him and get back to you with my thoughts. I appreciate your taking the time to introduce me to one of your favorite composers!
    Last edited by Siegmund; Saturday, October 23rd, 2004 at 06:14 AM. Reason: Browser crash

  9. #39
    "Du bist das Bild, das ich in mir barg..."
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Siegmund's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 @ 11:14 PM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Gender
    Politics
    Folkish
    Posts
    1,028
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    10
    Thanked in
    10 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skadi Ju87
    I listen to classical everyday...both my own CD's & tapes and the classical radio station/s (especially when I am cooking & model building...saves me from having to change the disc's.. ).

    Bach and Beethoven are my favourites, but I also love Mozart, Wagner, Chopin, Schubert, Vivaldi, Strauss, Brahms. Superior music worthy of thorough study & influential if one is a musician.
    If your music has been influenced by any of these, it must be great. Though I'm sure you've been asked before, how can one get a sample of your music? Do you have any CDs that are available at retail?

  10. #40
    Senior Member Mistress Klaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, March 15th, 2012 @ 06:54 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-Australian
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Gender
    Posts
    1,040
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts

    Post Re: Classical Music Lovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund
    If your music has been influenced by any of these, it must be great. Though I'm sure you've been asked before, how can one get a sample of your music? Do you have any CDs that are available at retail?

    I wish my musik had been influenced by classical all along (I have been listening to classical since I was a child...it is surprising!)...but for some reason I kept it sacred & carried forth with metal.
    I've attached a piece I have done for my upcoming album entitled "Katze Minuet" (unmixed at this stage, dedicated to my cats )...Influences of Beethoven, Vivaldi and Bach can be heard. (this wasn't deliberate at the time... )..

    My other material, including my past band Niflheim (metal) and some of my softer pieces of Skadheim (my solo band) can be downloaded from my SKADHEIM link on my signature. (links then Mp3's). Folkish female vocals and acoustic guitars etc.
    1 demo, 1 CD/album "Myrkvid", 2 video's, 1 vinyl 7"Ep and a gig with Death in June....my only claim to fame.. ...I like to do my own thing...getting a record deal was never my priority..

Page 4 of 23 FirstFirst 12345678914 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. World History Of Classical Music
    By Caledonian in forum History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Wednesday, March 30th, 2011, 05:46 PM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: Saturday, January 9th, 2010, 10:38 AM
  3. Anti-Semitism in Classical Music
    By infoterror in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 05:38 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •