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Thread: The passing of the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip

  1. #1

    The passing of the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip






    Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of reigning British monarch Queen Elizabeth II, has died at the age of 99. Buckingham Palace confirmed his death on April 9, 2021.

    “It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen has announced the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle,” the statement read. The Duke was married to the Queen for over 70 years, and was the longest-serving consort in British history.



    Prince Philip was admitted to hospital on February 16, after feeling unwell, but was released a month later, having undergone a successful procedure for a pre-existing heart condition.


    The son of Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark and Princess Alice, Philip was born on the Greek island of Corfu in 1921, but primarily raised in Britain. He renounced his right to the Greek and Danish thrones in 1947 and took his mother's surname, Mountbatten. Philip married Elizabeth Windsor, a distant cousin, later that year – five years before her ascension to the British throne in 1952.


    He became father to Prince Charles and grandfather to Prince Harry and Prince William. He was also father to Princess Anne and Princes Andrew and Edward.





    'Royal Family' (1969).


    The young Philip had a turbulent early life. His parents separated while the Duke was still a boy, and Princess Alice was diagnosed with schizophrenia and committed to an asylum in the late 1920s. As a child, Philip moved from Greece to France, to Britain, and then to Germany for his education, returning to the UK in the mid-1930s amid the rise of Nazism in Germany.


    His biographers describe his time in Britain as calm, though tragedy struck the young royal in 1937 when his sister, Cecile, and her German husband, along with their family, were killed in a plane crash at Ostend.


    A colorful character, Prince Philip’s forthright manner, political incorrectness, conservative political views and frequent public gaffes came to be a source of considerable embarrassment for the monarchy.


    Among his many blunders, Philip once asked British expats in Dubai if they were "running away from something" and told the President of Nigeria, who was wearing national traditional dress, that he looked like he was "ready for bed.” In 1998, he told a cash-strapped student to consider living in a hostel to “save cash.”


    “If you stay here much longer, you’ll go home with slitty eyes,” he told a British student studying in China in 1986. He also referred to places as near and far as Stoke-on-Trent and Beijing as "ghastly."


    He was also known for some self-deprecating humor, remarking on his marriage in 1999 that the Queen “has the quality of tolerance in abundance.”


    Philip retired from public engagements in 2017 after seven decades of service. Before Queen Elizabeth’s coronation the Duke served with the Royal Navy from January 1940 to the end of World War II.


    In addition to his royal duties, he also served in the role of president of the World Wildlife Fund between 1981 and 1996, as well as engaging in other philanthropic endeavors.


    The Duke was involved in a road accident in early 2019 when he collided with another car and his Land Rover flipped over. He had been suffering ill health in recent years and was admitted to hospital multiple times, including for a hip operation in 2018 and an infection in 2017, and most recently for treatment of a “pre-existing condition” in 2019.


    As the Duke aged, the British tabloid press often speculated about his deteriorating health. They reported in 2011 that he had given up his hobby of shooting after receiving a stent in his heart, and as the coronavirus pandemic spread in 2020, they reported on his isolation in Windsor Castle, watchful for any signs of ill health.


    However, both Philip and the Queen received their vaccinations against the virus in January.




    So let me get the timeline straight. He gets injected with AstraZeneca in late January, then a few weeks later is admitted to hospital for a month, then a few weeks later dies. Move along now, nothing to see here.



    The last sentence gives us a vital clue as to what really finished him off.In which regard, if that information is correct about them both, then the Queen will not be long behind as the pathogenic priming of the delayed side effects finally kicks in as the months pass... the timing is about right.


    Well he is the great grand son of the Russian Empreror Nicholas I so typical European Royalty, His blood lines were Russian ,and Danish , German. I am no Roylist but I liked him a great servant to the UK and Commonwealth. He changed with the times but I Think European Royalty had blood on its hands especially over the First World War.


    No, they weren't directly responsible. They are just figure heads. It is the Elites who profited from imperialism that needs to be called out.




    R T:
    Duke of Edinburgh, husband of Queen Elizabeth, dies at 99 12 IV 2021.


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  3. #2

    Philip at a Nazi funeral and the day his sister had lunch with Hitler


    Philip at a Nazi funeral and the day his sister had lunch with Hitler: TV documentary reopens a chapter of the Duke's family past



    • Photograph shows Prince Philip, 16, in a funeral procession in Germany
    • He was mourning death of his older sister Cecile, who died in an air crash
    • Three of his sisters married German aristocrats who became leading Nazis
    • The family links are set to be revisited in a new Channel 4 documentary


    Wearing a long, dark overcoat and a sombre expression, a handsome blond man marches through the streets of Germany.The remarkable photograph from 1937 shows Prince Philip, then just 16, in a funeral procession for his older sister Cecile, who was killed in an air crash. The young prince is flanked by grieving relatives, all wearing distinctive Nazi uniforms. One is clad in the uniform of the Brownshirts; another wears full SS regalia. The street in Darmstadt, near Frankfurt, is lined with crowds – many giving the ‘Heil Hitler’ salute.




    Sombre: Philip, circled, is pictured with relatives wearing Nazi uniforms at his sister Cecile's funeral in Germany in 1937.


    In another extraordinary photograph Prince Philip’s youngest sister Sophie – elegantly dressed with a fur hanging on the back of her chair – is seen sitting opposite Hitler at the wedding of Luftwaffe commander Hermann Goering and his bride Emmy.


    The pictures, featured in next week’s Channel 4 documentary Prince Philip: The Plot To Make A King, have been published before – and of course do not reflect on the Duke, who can hardly be reproached for mourning one sister or for the company kept by another. But the images lay bare the family connections brought into focus by the programme.


    Sophie was not the only sibling with Nazi links. Three of Philip’s four sisters – Margarita, Cecile and Sophie – married German aristocrats who became leading figures in the Nazi party.


    The documentary features an interview with Prince Rainer von Hessen, the son of Sophie and Prince Christoph. In it, he reveals the contents of his mother’s memoir for the first time.Princess Sophie writes of a private lunch with Hitler and how she thought he was a ‘charming and seemingly modest man’. She married Prince Christoph von Hessen, a director in the Third Reich Air Ministry, an SS colonel and the chief of Goering’s secret intelligence service – responsible for spying on anti-Nazis.


    The couple were such devoted Nazis that they named their first son Karl Adolf in honour of Hitler.






    Celebration: Philip's sister Sophie, right, opposite Hitler at the 1935 wedding of Goering (with gold braid) in scene featured in Channel 4 documentary.



    Prince Philip’s oldest sister, Princess Margarita, married Gottfried, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. During the war, Prince Gottfried fought for the Germans on the Russian front, where he was badly wounded. But he turned against the Fuhrer, and was among the aristocratic officers implicated in the plot to assassinate Hitler on July 20, 1944 – which led to Prince Gottfried’s dismissal from the army.



    Philip broke a 60-year public silence about his family’s Nazi ties in 2006. In an interview for a book titled Royals and the Reich, he said that – like many Germans – they found Hitler’s early attempts to restore Germany’s power and prestige ‘attractive’. ‘There was a great improvement in things like trains running on time and building,’ he explained.




    The Duke has previously stressed he was never ‘conscious of anybody in the family actually expressing anti-Semitic views’.


    ‘There was a sense of hope after the depressing chaos of the Weimar Republic. I can understand people latching on to something or somebody who appeared to be appealing to their patriotism and trying to get things going. You can understand how attractive it was.’ The duke stressed that he was never ‘conscious of anybody in the family actually expressing anti-Semitic views’. But he added that there were ‘inhibitions about the Jews’ and ‘jealousy of their success’.



    Unsurprisingly, none of Prince Philip’s sisters were invited to the Queen’s wedding in 1947. The German connection was still too shaming, only two years after the end of the war.



    Philip’s opposition to the Nazis has never been in doubt. He fought valiantly for Britain during the war, seeing action in the Battle of Crete, the Battle of Cape Matapan in Greece and the Allied invasion of Sicily. But, as the documentary shows, there were questions and disquiet at court about the prince’s German blood. The Queen Mother apparently referred to Prince Philip as ‘the Hun’. And, although he was born a prince of the Greek royal family, his mother was Princess Alice of Battenberg, daughter of a German prince.



    Prince Philip’s father, Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark, is descended from the German ducal house of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg – Philip’s real surname. But, on his marriage to Princess Elizabeth, he assumed his mother’s maternal surname – Mountbatten, which is an Anglicised version of the German ‘Battenberg’.



    The Queen’s real surname is also is German – Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. That was the surname of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s husband, who was born near Coburg in Germany.



    The Royal Family’s surname was changed to Windsor in 1917, during the First World War, when Saxe-Coburg-Gotha was considered too German a name – not least because the planes coming over to bomb Britain were called Gotha bombers.




    HOW THE 'FUHRER TURNED ON CHARM OVER MEAL AT OUR FLAT'



    Prince Philip’s older sister Sophie met Adolf Hitler and his henchman Hermann Goering after she married a German aristocrat. In a previously unpublished memoir, written in her old age, she described how family friend Goering came for tea at her flat near Frankfurt before the Nazis rose to power. She wrote: ‘He talked a lot about the new political party which he had joined, the “Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei”. ‘He was very enthusiastic about it all, especially about the party leader, a man called Adolf Hitler. ‘As Germany was going through hard times and there was a lot of poverty and general dissatisfaction everywhere, we were interested to hear about the great improvements his party was planning to do.’



    Prince Philip’s older sister Sophie met Adolf Hitler and Hermann Goering (right) after she married a German aristocrat




    Princess Sophie later met the Nazi leader at her home. ‘As Goering was insistent we should meet Hitler personally, we decided to ask him to lunch at our flat,’ she wrote. ‘I had been warned he was a vegetarian, and found it difficult to plan an appropriate meal. In those days we had a cook-housekeeper, which was just as well, as my ideas about cooking and housekeeping were fairly hazy (being only eighteen at the time). ‘We settled for an assortment of vegetables which turned out to be a great success. ‘I have to say here, that, although Chri [her husband Prince Christoph von Hessen] and I changed our political view fundamentally some years later, we were impressed by this charming and seemingly modest man, and by his plans to change and improve the situation in Germany.



    ‘This explains why Chri joined the SS in 1932, as his new friends had urged him to do. ‘In 1935 he was appointed head of the “Forschungsamt” [research bureau] of the Air Ministry. ‘Its employees were pledged to secrecy and Chri never spoke about his work.’ The couple married in 1930 when Sophie was 16. Her meetings with Goering and Hitler appear to have taken place in 1931 or 1932. Prince Christoph was killed in a plane crash in 1943 and his wife died in 2001. Excerpts from her private memoir were read by the couple’s son – Prince Rainer von Hessen – as part of the Channel 4 Secret History documentary Prince Philip: The Plot To Make A King. The programme is due to be shown at 9pm on July 30, 2015.



    My parents and I have completely different political viewpoints. Why would you think theirs would be the same.


    How can you shame the D. of E. over walking in his own sister's funeral when he was 16. The look on his face is tragic and reminds me of Prince William and Harry walking in the procession behind their mother. That’s a low blow!


    Philip's sister Cecile and her husband and children were on their way to a family wedding in London when their plane went down. She had been very pregnant at the time of the crash. There were no survivors in the crash. One child from the family did not make the flight, a very young female. Otherwise, the ducal family was wiped out. That is the funeral Philip is attending: his sister, brother-in-law, nephews. Yet, instead of focusing on the tragedy of the situation, the Daily Mail expects us to be appalled by the pre-war uniforms and salutes.


    This story is just part of history.



    Prince Philip at a Nazi funeral and ... - Daily Mail Online

    13 IV 2021.


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    Now that Edinburgh is dead and gone, they're going to fixate on this Nazi stuff excessively. Remember when Harry wore the armband and was with a Rhodesian girlfriend? Is his present predicament an imposed penance?

    Anyway, I agree with the heir of Greece and Denmark to use Oldcastle instead of Oldenburg. Mountbatten is no more another version of his surname (but his mother's) than Windsor is for the Queen, but that works as her uncle was Duke of Windsor. I agree with the Prince that it's wrong to force the Windsor name onto his children. They could take the name of Edinburgh and that at least would show a paternal lineage honouring him at least, even if they want a clean break from his own father's legacy. Oldcastle would be an excellent way of connecting with the English, because of John Oldcastle, but steps should be taken to show how the Duke is related to Queen Anne's husband, Prince George of Denmark-Norway.

    Any kind of opposition to this dynasty succeeding should make note more of their connection to the Stuart dynasty than any other factor, as Anne finally oversaw a united England and Scotland in 1707 and the heir to this Queen is named Charles. Whether the Prince of Wales goes by Charles III and aggravates the Jacobites, or George VII after his grandfather and aggravates the pooh pooh crowd against WWI and WWII, he probably won't choose his own father's name and be known as King Philip II because of Bloody Mary's husband. LOL if Charles wants to be known as King Arthur...would he be I or II?

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    My parents and I have completely different political viewpoints. Why would you think theirs would be the same.


    How can you shame the D. of E. over walking in his own sister's funeral when he was 16. The look on his face is tragic and reminds me of Prince William and Harry walking in the procession behind their mother. That’s a low blow!


    Philip's sister Cecile and her husband and children were on their way to a family wedding in London when their plane went down. She had been very pregnant at the time of the crash. There were no survivors in the crash. One child from the family did not make the flight, a very young female. Otherwise, the ducal family was wiped out. That is the funeral Philip is attending: his sister, brother-in-law, nephews. Yet, instead of focusing on the tragedy of the situation, the Daily Mail expects us to be appalled by the pre-war uniforms and salutes.


    This story is just part of history.
    The Daily Mail is a cheap sensationalist tabloid that has been stuck in wartime propaganda mode for 80 years. By their character, propaganda rags (which indeed most news outlets have become) speak more truth about themselves than they do about what they report.
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