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Thread: The George Floyd Armageddon: Iconoclast Mob Destroys Our Heritage And Civilisation As America Burns From Coast To Coast

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    An All-Black Group Is Arming Itself and Demanding Change. They Are the NFAC

    Nicole Chavez et al., CNN, October 25, 2020



    When two loud bangs rang out on the streets of Lafayette, Louisiana, no one knew where the gunshots came from as protesters gathered to demand justice for another Black man killed by police.

    Among the crowd was a group of armed Black men and women who call themselves the “Not F**king Around Coalition” or NFAC. The group did not run toward the gunshots or break formation. Instead, they kneeled on the ground amid the confusion, and then walked away after their leader shouted, “fall back! fall back!”

    The all-Black, Atlanta-based group has grown in size out of frustration during a summer of protests against questionable policing and the deaths of countless Black people at the hands of police, said their founder John Fitzgerald Johnson.

    Their presence has caused a stir in the cities they’ve visited and the group has drawn some criticism after people accidentally fired a weapon during two of their rallies, including the one in Lafayette.

    Started in 2017, the group has marched in Stone Mountain, Georgia, calling for the removal of the nation’s largest confederate monument; Brunswick, Georgia, for Ahmaud Arbery; Louisville, Kentucky, demanding more transparency in the Breonna Taylor case; and most recently Lafayette, Louisiana, in the name of Trayford Pellerin.

    Along with protesters rallying in multiple US cities, largely White groups have also showed up and asserted their Second Amendment right to bear arms. Unlike many of those groups, Johnson says his group emerged as a response to enduring racial inequality and police brutality.

    “We’re not ‘effing’ around anymore with the continued abuses within our community and the lack of respect for our men, women and children,” Johnson told CNN.

    The all-Black group, Johnson said, intends to protect, self-police and educate Black communities on firearms and their constitutional rights.

    “We are not against anyone,” said Johnson, who is also known as Grand Master Jay.



    Large Black armed-groups aren’t something often seen in the US. The most well-known was the Black Panther Party established in 1966 after the shooting of Matthew Johnson, a Black teenager killed by police. The group has since mostly disappeared.

    NFAC already stands apart from other groups across the country, Thomas Mockaitis, a professor of history at DePaul University and author of “Violent Extremists: Understanding the Domestic and International Terrorist Threat,” told CNN.

    “In one sense it (NFAC) echoes the Black Panthers but they are more heavily armed and more disciplined… So far, they’ve coordinated with police and avoided engaging with violence,” he said.

    NFAC’s members clad in black have raised their fists and shouted “Black power” in at least three cities without major incidents but days of tensions have preceded their rallies.

    When the NFAC marched in Louisville, they were met by an armed, largely White extremist group called the “Three Percenters.” The two groups yelled at one another but were kept apart by riot police. Shots were fired at the event when a NFAC member dropped his weapon and injured three other NFAC members with buckshot. Johnson has said it was an accident.

    Earlier this month, the NFAC headed to southern Louisiana after seeing a Facebook post from US Rep. Clay Higgins, who represents the 3rd District. The September 1 post on Higgins’ campaign page, which has since been removed, included photos of Black armed demonstrators and warned that if such protesters came to Lafayette he would “drop 10 of you where you stand,” according to CNN affiliate KATC.

    Local officials granted NFAC a permit to hold their event on October 3. The group converged there to protest the killing of Trayford Pellerin, a 31-year-old Black man shot by police in August.



    The protest ended peacefully despite the arrest of a person who police say accidentally fired a weapon at the event. The NFAC said the person was not part of their group.

    There isn’t one way to police armed groups because every state and city has its own rules but authorities tend to take a “very cautious, almost kid glove approach” with them, said Carolyn Gallaher, a professor and senior associate dean in the School of International Service at American University.

    For Judson L. Jeffries, a professor of African American and African Studies at Ohio State University, the NFAC’s priority so far has been stopping police brutality and it would be interesting to see how the group’s behavior and ideology evolves going forward.

    The group could follow Martin Luther King Jr’s train of thought, he says, showing “a great deal of patience and love for those who were oppressing him” or align more with Malcolm X who favored self-defense against White violence.

    “I hope we don’t get to the point where we witness shootout, open warfare between police departments and these (armed) groups,” Jeffries said. “I can’t help but wonder if we are nearing that point because there’s only so much punishment you can clip on a group of people before they respond likewise.”

    Johnson won’t disclose the membership numbers but said his group grew “exponentially” after the Louisville march and after they dropped the age limit from 21 to 18 years old.

    And for some people like Kristen “K.C.” Colemon and her 9-year-old daughter, the group is seen as a symbol of empowerment rather than fear.

    “It was beautiful to have a group showing America and White groups that we are not backing down,” Colemon, a hairstylist from Knoxville, told CNN.

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    San Bernardino, Calif., Police Shooting Sparks Night of Unrest

    Quote Originally Posted by Verđandi
    Black Lives Matter rallies because police shot an armed criminal.
    Dozens of protesters came out Friday night to demonstrate against the police-involved shooting of a Black man in Southern California one night earlier.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Verđandi View Post
    Nicole Chavez et al., CNN, October 25, 2020



    When two loud bangs rang out on the streets of Lafayette, Louisiana, no one knew where the gunshots came from as protesters gathered to demand justice for another Black man killed by police.

    Among the crowd was a group of armed Black men and women who call themselves the “Not F**king Around Coalition” or NFAC. The group did not run toward the gunshots or break formation. Instead, they kneeled on the ground amid the confusion, and then walked away after their leader shouted, “fall back! fall back!”

    The all-Black, Atlanta-based group has grown in size out of frustration during a summer of protests against questionable policing and the deaths of countless Black people at the hands of police, said their founder John Fitzgerald Johnson.

    Their presence has caused a stir in the cities they’ve visited and the group has drawn some criticism after people accidentally fired a weapon during two of their rallies, including the one in Lafayette.

    Started in 2017, the group has marched in Stone Mountain, Georgia, calling for the removal of the nation’s largest confederate monument; Brunswick, Georgia, for Ahmaud Arbery; Louisville, Kentucky, demanding more transparency in the Breonna Taylor case; and most recently Lafayette, Louisiana, in the name of Trayford Pellerin.

    Along with protesters rallying in multiple US cities, largely White groups have also showed up and asserted their Second Amendment right to bear arms. Unlike many of those groups, Johnson says his group emerged as a response to enduring racial inequality and police brutality.

    “We’re not ‘effing’ around anymore with the continued abuses within our community and the lack of respect for our men, women and children,” Johnson told CNN.

    The all-Black group, Johnson said, intends to protect, self-police and educate Black communities on firearms and their constitutional rights.

    “We are not against anyone,” said Johnson, who is also known as Grand Master Jay.



    Large Black armed-groups aren’t something often seen in the US. The most well-known was the Black Panther Party established in 1966 after the shooting of Matthew Johnson, a Black teenager killed by police. The group has since mostly disappeared.

    NFAC already stands apart from other groups across the country, Thomas Mockaitis, a professor of history at DePaul University and author of “Violent Extremists: Understanding the Domestic and International Terrorist Threat,” told CNN.

    “In one sense it (NFAC) echoes the Black Panthers but they are more heavily armed and more disciplined… So far, they’ve coordinated with police and avoided engaging with violence,” he said.

    NFAC’s members clad in black have raised their fists and shouted “Black power” in at least three cities without major incidents but days of tensions have preceded their rallies.

    When the NFAC marched in Louisville, they were met by an armed, largely White extremist group called the “Three Percenters.” The two groups yelled at one another but were kept apart by riot police. Shots were fired at the event when a NFAC member dropped his weapon and injured three other NFAC members with buckshot. Johnson has said it was an accident.

    Earlier this month, the NFAC headed to southern Louisiana after seeing a Facebook post from US Rep. Clay Higgins, who represents the 3rd District. The September 1 post on Higgins’ campaign page, which has since been removed, included photos of Black armed demonstrators and warned that if such protesters came to Lafayette he would “drop 10 of you where you stand,” according to CNN affiliate KATC.

    Local officials granted NFAC a permit to hold their event on October 3. The group converged there to protest the killing of Trayford Pellerin, a 31-year-old Black man shot by police in August.



    The protest ended peacefully despite the arrest of a person who police say accidentally fired a weapon at the event. The NFAC said the person was not part of their group.

    There isn’t one way to police armed groups because every state and city has its own rules but authorities tend to take a “very cautious, almost kid glove approach” with them, said Carolyn Gallaher, a professor and senior associate dean in the School of International Service at American University.

    For Judson L. Jeffries, a professor of African American and African Studies at Ohio State University, the NFAC’s priority so far has been stopping police brutality and it would be interesting to see how the group’s behavior and ideology evolves going forward.

    The group could follow Martin Luther King Jr’s train of thought, he says, showing “a great deal of patience and love for those who were oppressing him” or align more with Malcolm X who favored self-defense against White violence.

    “I hope we don’t get to the point where we witness shootout, open warfare between police departments and these (armed) groups,” Jeffries said. “I can’t help but wonder if we are nearing that point because there’s only so much punishment you can clip on a group of people before they respond likewise.”

    Johnson won’t disclose the membership numbers but said his group grew “exponentially” after the Louisville march and after they dropped the age limit from 21 to 18 years old.

    And for some people like Kristen “K.C.” Colemon and her 9-year-old daughter, the group is seen as a symbol of empowerment rather than fear.

    “It was beautiful to have a group showing America and White groups that we are not backing down,” Colemon, a hairstylist from Knoxville, told CNN.
    These black supremacist goons recently "marched" in Kentucky's largest city, Louisville, as mentioned in the article. While there the imbeciles managed to accidentally shoot each other, lol. Even their "leader" plainly knows little about the weapons they posture with, and how to handle them. Evidently there's been more than one incident of this group accidentally discharging weapons in public. It's notable they don't "march" against criminal gang violence and murder by and against their own kind, which is the most prevalent threat to the negro in this country.
    The controlled media never refer to the group's racist beliefs or background either. They're just a "Black militia" in news reports.
    "Almost every name belongs to well-known families of English stock....these soldiers were of ancient American lineage"- Prof. N.S. Shaler on the 1st Kentucky "Orphan" Brigade, Confederate States Army

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    https://www.foxnews.com/us/night-two...-speak-out.amp

    A now tiresomely familiar script, this time in Philadelphia.
    Cops shoot reportedly armed belligerent negro, mob looting ensues exploiting the incident.
    Thirty cops reported injured.
    What a shock a Foot Locker was among the mob's targets. Dey got em sum Jordans. Cuz racial justis.
    "Almost every name belongs to well-known families of English stock....these soldiers were of ancient American lineage"- Prof. N.S. Shaler on the 1st Kentucky "Orphan" Brigade, Confederate States Army

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    Video of Philadelphia police shooting Walter Wallace Jr. sparks protests



    Updated Oct 27, 11:18 AM; Posted Oct 27, 11:18 AM

    Al.com

    More than a dozen people were arrested and more than 30 officers injured in protests stemming from the police shooting death of a Black man they say refused their orders to drop a knife in a confrontation captured on video, Philadelphia police said Tuesday.

    The man, identified by city officials as Walter Wallace, 27, was shot before 4 p.m. Monday in an episode filmed by a bystander and posted on social media. Bystanders and neighbors complained that police fired excessive shots.

    Wallace’s father, Walter Wallace Sr., told The Philadelphia Inquirer that his son appeared to have been shot 10 times. He said his son was also a father, was on medication and struggled with his mental health.

    “Why didn’t they use a Taser?” he asked.

    Officers had been called to the predominantly Black Cobbs Creek neighborhood in west Philadelphia on reports of a man with a weapon, said Officer Tanya Little, a police spokesperson.

    Officers said they found Wallace holding a knife and ordered him to drop the weapon several times. Wallace advanced toward the officers, who fired several times, Little said.



    In the video, a woman and at least one man follow Wallace, trying to get him to listen to officers, as he briskly walks across the street and between cars. The woman, identified by family members as Wallace’s mother, screams and throws something at an officer after her son is shot and falls to the ground.

    The video does not make it clear whether he was in fact holding a knife, but witnesses said he was.

    Wallace was hit in the shoulder and chest, Little said, but she would not say how many times he was shot or the number of times officers fired. One of the officers drove him to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead a short time later, she said.

    No officers or bystanders were injured in the initial confrontation, Little said. The names of the officers who fired the shots, and their races, were not immediately disclosed. Both were wearing body cameras and were taken off street duty during the investigation.

    Neighbors and witnesses soon gathered Monday night on the block of Locust Street where the shooting occurred, yelling that police didn’t have to shoot Wallace and didn’t have to fire so many shots.

    Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw went to the scene Monday and spoke to neighbors, and both Mayor Jim Kenney, a Democrat, and Outlaw said they would hold a meeting soon to talk with the community about the shooting and other concerns.

    “I heard and felt the anger of the community,” Outlaw said in a statement, adding that the video “raises many questions” and that “those questions will be fully addressed by the investigation.”

    Hundreds of people later took to the streets in west Philadelphia into the wee hours of Tuesday, with interactions between protesters and police turning violent at times, the Inquirer reported. Video showed many yelling at officers and crying.

    Dozens of protesters gathered at a nearby park and chanted “Black lives matter.”

    Police cars and dumpsters were set on fire as police struggled to contain the crowds. More than a dozen officers, many with batons in hand, formed a line as they ran down 52nd Street. The crowd largely dispersed then.

    Thirty officers were injured, most of them from thrown objects such as bricks and rocks, according to police. One officer had a broken leg and other injuries after she was struck by a pickup truck, police said. The other injured officers were treated and released.

    The 52nd Street corridor was also the site of protests against police brutality at the end of May, after George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis police. Those protests have been the subject of City Council hearings, with protesters describing harsh and unnecessary tactics, including tear gas and projectiles fired by police.

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    “Diversity Grove”: Birmingham Street Names Get Woke



    After Birmingham City Council invited members of the public to come up with new street names for a regeneration scheme, winners included “Diversity Grove” and “Equality Road”.

    According to the council, the names were selected “based on the theme of cohesion and shared values.”

    Louise Kilbride, the woman whose suggested street names were chosen by a panel of judges, said she wanted them to “reflect the diversity of the Perry Barr area.”

    A Google News search for Perry Barr reveals that the area has a high crime rate which increased this past summer after numerous robberies and firearms offenses, leading to police being handed Section 60 powers to stop and search people without reasonable grounds.

    “Remember when we used to dedicate street names to heroes,” responded one Twitter user.

    Others asked why the names weren’t based on successful people from the area, with one accusing the council of engaging in “Utter woke nonsense.”

    Unfortunately for those living in the area, studies have shown that “diversity” produces the exact opposite of cohesion.

    A peer reviewed study by Danish academics at the University of Copenhagen found that ethnic diversity has a negative impact on communities because it erodes trust.

    Seeking to answer whether “continued immigration and corresponding growing ethnic diversity” was having a positive impact on community cohesion, the study found the opposite to be the case.

    Studying existing literature and also carrying out a meta-analysis of 1,001 estimates from 87 studies, the researchers concluded, “We find a statistically significant negative relationship between ethnic diversity and social trust across all studies.”

    Meanwhile, in France, President Macron has “called for the creation of a list of 300 to 500 “Black or Arab historical figures” who should have public places, monuments and streets named after them.”

    “There is a whole part of our collective history which is not represented, there is a whole part of our history which speaks to our youth who are black, coming from Africa or Maghreb areas and who have their heroes,” Macron said in an interview.

    As we document in the video below, one of the first things that violent Maoist cultural revolutionaries did when they took over society was to rename streets.

    Just a coincidence, I’m sure.

    Infowars

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    Post-George Floyd, a Wave of ‘Anti-Racist’ Teaching Sweeps K-12 Schools Targeting ‘Whiteness’



    John Murawski, Real Clear Investigations, November 24, 2020

    The notices to parents began arriving fast and furious in the weeks after the death of George Floyd in late May.

    In dramatic, urgent language, K-12 schools across the country – both public and private – professed solidarity with Black Lives Matter and vowed to dismantle white supremacy, as they scrambled to introduce anti-racist courses and remake themselves into racism-free zones.

    The president of the Lower Merion School Board on Philadelphia’s affluent Main Line declared to families: “We need to eradicate white supremacy and heteropatriarchy in all of our institutions.”

    In Maine, a coastal public school district where 3.7% of the 2,100 students are African American or Hispanic, the superintendent declared war on “the intentional barriers white people have built to harm Black people.” The top administrator added: “We grieve for all of the Black lives taken by white supremacy.”

    Educators at the prestigious Brentwood College School in Los Angeles, have made more changes to the curriculum this year than any other in the private school’s nearly five decade history. Teachers are introducing critical race theory, which views U.S. history through the prism of racial conflict, and assigning readings from Ibram X. Kendi, the academic and author who contends race-neutral policies are the bulwark of the “White ethnostate.”

    As part of the makeover, Brentwood School leaders have rolled out a fresh theme this year for fifth graders: “Identity and Power.”

    “While some view these recent shifts as indoctrination, we see them as opportunities for engagement,” Brentwood’s head of school, Mike Riera, wrote to families this fall, acknowledging the growing resistance from some parents. “Will we overstep in some areas? Possibly. Will we understep in others? Possibly.”

    The nation’s K-12 schools have been incrementally adopting multiculturalism and ethnic studies for decades, but such courses have been the exception rather than the rule. This summer’s Black Lives Matter protests have sparked new level of commitment, a newfound urgency, and a new trend: anti-racist pedagogy.

    If administrators deliver on their promises, the sweeping changes underway will introduce new courses, shift hiring priorities, rebalance student demographics, redirect stipends and scholarships, revise conduct standards – in many ways modeling K-12 educational philosophy on the social justice values endorsed by many universities and, increasingly, corporations.

    The changes come at an unprecedented time when many schools are struggling to offer basic instruction under covid restrictions.

    Fabienne Doucet, a New York University professor of early childhood education and urban education, said this momentum has been building for decades and the culture now appears primed to understand race in America from the moral perspective of the Black Lives Matter movement.

    “What’s really different now – and this has been decades in coming – is talking explicitly about whiteness,” Doucet said, citing a term that academics and activists use to critique the cultural, political and economic dominance exercised by Europeans and their descendants.

    The rapid and radical changes in public and private schools have triggered a backlash among some parents who find the anti-racist message to be anti-white and anti-American, and those who say it’s historically inaccurate, inflammatory and divisive.

    Parents are forming Instagram sites, and at least one group calling itself No Left Turn in Education is seeking to mobilize parents around the country to reverse the woke juggernaut. The parents swap examples from their schools, but many are keeping incognito for fear of being accused of racism or other repercussions; indeed, several parents interviewed for this article didn’t want their names to be used.

    Their concern is that the edgy, new educational materials indoctrinate pupils with identity politics and leftist ideology, and leave no room for discussion.

    “They are using very positive words like diversity, equity and inclusivity to mislead you, but the message behind these words is horrifying,” said Elana Yaron Fishbein, a suburban Philadelphia mom who created the No Left Turn in Education organization. “They are grouping and stereotyping human beings by skin color, and they are attributing characteristics to your personality based on skin color.”

    Educators are overwhelmingly progressive on social justice issues. This summer the EdWeek Research Center found that 81% of the nation’s teachers, principals and district leaders support the Black Lives Matter movement, compared to 67% of the general population as surveyed separately by the Pew Research Center. The American Federation of Teachers, the nation’s second-largest teachers’ labor union, was among the numerous professional educator organizations that issued a statement in support of Black Lives Matter in response to “the crisis of anti-Blackness.”

    The K-12 changes are already taking shape. Some institutions, such as Hopkins School in Connecticut and Princeton Day School in New Jersey, are segregating faculty and staff into “affinity groups” – such as Latinx or “White Consciousness” – while holding discussions about racism and white privilege. Others, such as Montgomery County Public Schools in Maryland, are spending nearly half-a-million dollars for “anti-racist system audits” conducted by outside consultants.

    The $46,300-a-year Hopkins School, the third oldest independent school in the United States, is revamping its courses “to incorporate a social justice lens, de-center Anglo-European voices,” focus instruction on race and identity, fund student activism and projects, and add a stand-alone course on social justice.

    Buffalo Public Schools, where whites account for 22% of enrolled students, this fall adopted Black Lives Matter-themed lessons plans that ask students in grades 2-4 if there are any similarities between the coronavirus epidemic today and the supposedly intentional spread of smallpox to the Native Americans, described as an 18th-century form of “biological warfare.” Middle and high schoolers are taught to think of Western justice as “punitive” and the justice meted out in traditional societies as “restorative/empathetic.” One of the included documents for instructors states: “All white people play a part in perpetuating systemic racism.”

    The National Education Association, the nation’s largest labor union, has posted an entire page of BLM teaching resources, while Black Lives Matter is also disseminating educational materials.

    Anti-racist materials present a mix of themes – an emphasis on liberation and resistance movements, critiques of whiteness and systemic racism that come from critical race theory, and an introduction to other social justice causes. At times, the readings and lessons can take an unapologetic, even confrontational, stance toward America’s past and present. But unlike Black History Month, there are few if any mentions of African Americans who defied the color barrier as athletes, artists, inventors, scientists or soldiers.

    The NEA teaching themes include Justice for George [Floyd] Day, Transgender Day of Remembrance, Globalism and Collective Value, Queer Organizing Behind the Scenes, Unapologetically Black Day and Student Activist Day. A link to social justice math used in Seattle Public Schools teaches data analysis and mathematical modeling through examples of police brutality and excessive use of force.

    The BLM materials starting at the early childhood level are rooted in such guiding principles as empathy, loving engagement and diversity, as well as trans affirming, queer affirming and disrupting the Western nuclear family societal norm to celebrate extended families, nontraditional families and villages that “collective care for one another.” Elementary school activities introduce kids to community activism, the visual symbols of the LGBT movement, advocating for people with physical disabilities, and a creating a communal activism mural.

    An elementary school-level proposed activity called “Match the Action” teaches children to identify different forms of resistance: boycotts, protests, rallies, marches, sit-ins, walkouts, petitions, etc. A proposed activity for middle schoolers reads: “Think about the names of people who are no longer with us who you wish you could talk to. Activists, leaders, elders, people who have been murdered by police.”
    Fatima Morrell, an associate superintendent at Buffalo Public Schools, describes her district’s approach to education as an “emancipation pedagogy” that empowers black pupils by “problematizing the Eurocentric perspective” and by authentically representing the African American experience, which allows black students see themselves reflected in the curriculum and realize their human potential.

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    Utah College Votes to Nix Confederate-Tied ‘Dixie’ from Name

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A university in Utah voted Monday to drop “Dixie” from its name — an example of the nation’s reexamination of the remnants of Confederacy and slavery.

    Dixie State University’s Board of Trustees unanimously recommended the name change after reviewing the results of a study that showed some employers in other states expressed concern about the Dixie name on graduates’ resumes. It also said nearly two-thirds of people in the college's recruiting region associate the name Dixie with the Confederacy.

    “I don’t know how we justify saying we are an open and inclusive university if we maintain anything that brings up visions of a racist, Confederate history," board vice chairwoman Tiffany Wilson said at the meeting.

    The recommendation was made to the state’s Board of Higher Education and must be approved by the Republican-controlled state Legislature.

    The university in St. George about 300 miles (480 kilometers) south of Salt Lake City had faced scrutiny in the past over its name but had resisted changing it. The area was nicknamed Dixie, a reference to Southern states, when settlers with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, many of them from the South, tried to make it into a cotton-growing mecca in the 1800s.

    Supporters say the name is important to the area’s heritage and is separate from the history of slavery. But efforts across the U.S. to remove monuments, names and other Confederate symbols have intensified during the nation’s reckoning over racial injustice.

    The study done by a Salt Lake City management consulting firm indicated that support for the name did not extend far beyond the surrounding community, which could hurt student and faculty recruitment. The data showed that 33% of southern Utah residents and 64% of people from the university’s recruiting region associated the name Dixie with the Confederacy.

    University administrators said they were concerned by several findings, including that 22% of recent graduates seeking jobs outside Utah have had an employer express concern about the Dixie name on their resume.

    “I don’t think it’s wise to kick the can down the road any farther,” said trustee and St. George Mayor Jon Pike. “It’s coming up more frequently now, and I think we need to focus on reality. We can’t assume that the pipeline of students will just continue to flow as it has.”

    Dixie State has taken steps in recent years to remove some Confederate imagery. In 2009, the school’s nickname was changed from the Rebels to Red Storm. A statue depicting a soldier on a horseback waving a Confederate flag with one hand and reaching out to a wounded soldier with the other was removed in 2012.

    In 2013, a group of students, faculty and activists unsuccessfully pushed for a name change. The board unanimously voted to retain the name after a survey found broad local support.

    Jeanetta Williams, president of the NAACP’s Salt Lake chapter, said she was “overjoyed” to see that Dixie State now supports changing its name and rejecting Confederate symbols.

    “I have been in this fight, in this struggle for years, and so to hear this — it is a happy day,” said Williams, who was a vocal critic of the school’s decision in 2013. “It’s one of those changes that needed to be done, and I was happy to have been a part of it."

    USAnews.com

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    Wish.com Removes Most Confederate Merchandise



    • Before Christmas, visitors to the online retailer Wish.com could purchase a number of items celebrating the Confederacy, from flags to shirts to hats.
    • After Insider pointed out the items last week, the company removed most but not all related merchandise.
    • "Wish prohibits the listing of products that glorify or endorse hatred towards others," a company spokesperson said Monday.
    • But visitors can still purchase items that violate the company's policy, including merchandise glorifying dictators Bashar al-Assad and Saddam Hussein.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.


    This holiday season, visitors to Wish.com — the online retailer whose name is featured on jerseys worn by LeBron James and other members of the Los Angeles Lakers — were able to buy an item that is officially prohibited for promoting hate: the battle flag of the defeated Confederate States of America.

    Paid ads on the site actually featured Mississippi's recently scrapped state banner, which included the Confederate flag in the top left corner. In the ad, the symbol of the Confederacy, and the lost cause of chattel slavery, is featured prominently; hundreds of people purchased these items, according to the site.

    Following an inquiry from Insider, most but not all of that merchandise has now been purged.



    Confederate flags were available for purchase on Wish.com throughout the holiday season.

    "Wish prohibits the listing of products that glorify or endorse hatred towards others," a company spokesperson said Monday, noting it "deploys a number of measures to prevent these types of listings and removes them if prevention was unsuccessful."

    Led by billionaire and former Google engineer Peter Szulczewski, the e-commerce site, akin to eBay and Amazon, brought in just under $2 billion in revenue in 2019. It also raised $1.1 billion when it went public on the stock exchange in November 2020.

    Like its competitors, Wish has an explicit policy on "hateful symbols": it does not allow them. Nazi memorabilia, the alt-right "Kekistan" flag, and "dictator glorification" are all expressly prohibited.

    The company's policy threatens to impose a $10 fine on those who sell prohibited items. The company spokesperson did not immediately respond when asked if the penalty had been imposed on those who listed the Confederate merchandise.

    Although Wish has a clear policy against symbols of hate, enforcement is uneven.

    In 2019, for example, Wish and Amazon were both forced to apologize after The Auschwitz Museum revealed that the sites were selling Christmas tree ornaments with photos of the concentration camp, as Wired reported.

    Confederate merchandise also remains just one quick search away, including a "Confederate States Cavalry" flag and matching baseball cap, despite the renewed effort to clean up the site.



    Items celebrating the Confederacy continue to be listed at Wish.com, despite a policy prohibiting their sale. Screenshot/Wish.com

    As of Monday night, visitors could also purchase t-shirts, hoodies, and face masks celebrating Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian strongman whom the US concluded used chemical weapons along with indiscriminate bombing campaigns that have killed hundreds of thousands and forced millions of other people to flee their homeland.



    Numerous items featuring Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad are available to purchase at Wish.com.

    Users can also buy t-shirts and cell phone cases featuring Saddam Hussein, who over the summer of 2020 was featured in a seemingly algorithm-driven social media campaign from the company that highlighted a $20 framed photo of the deceased Iraqi dictator.

    A spokesperson for the Los Angeles Lakers, which announced a corporate partnership with Wish in 2017, did not respond to emails requesting comment.

    Businessinsider

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    Quote Originally Posted by Verđandi View Post


    • Before Christmas, visitors to the online retailer Wish.com could purchase a number of items celebrating the Confederacy, from flags to shirts to hats.
    • After Insider pointed out the items last week, the company removed most but not all related merchandise.
    • "Wish prohibits the listing of products that glorify or endorse hatred towards others," a company spokesperson said Monday.
    • But visitors can still purchase items that violate the company's policy, including merchandise glorifying dictators Bashar al-Assad and Saddam Hussein.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.


    This holiday season, visitors to Wish.com — the online retailer whose name is featured on jerseys worn by LeBron James and other members of the Los Angeles Lakers — were able to buy an item that is officially prohibited for promoting hate: the battle flag of the defeated Confederate States of America.

    Paid ads on the site actually featured Mississippi's recently scrapped state banner, which included the Confederate flag in the top left corner. In the ad, the symbol of the Confederacy, and the lost cause of chattel slavery, is featured prominently; hundreds of people purchased these items, according to the site.

    Following an inquiry from Insider, most but not all of that merchandise has now been purged.



    Confederate flags were available for purchase on Wish.com throughout the holiday season.

    "Wish prohibits the listing of products that glorify or endorse hatred towards others," a company spokesperson said Monday, noting it "deploys a number of measures to prevent these types of listings and removes them if prevention was unsuccessful."

    Led by billionaire and former Google engineer Peter Szulczewski, the e-commerce site, akin to eBay and Amazon, brought in just under $2 billion in revenue in 2019. It also raised $1.1 billion when it went public on the stock exchange in November 2020.

    Like its competitors, Wish has an explicit policy on "hateful symbols": it does not allow them. Nazi memorabilia, the alt-right "Kekistan" flag, and "dictator glorification" are all expressly prohibited.

    The company's policy threatens to impose a $10 fine on those who sell prohibited items. The company spokesperson did not immediately respond when asked if the penalty had been imposed on those who listed the Confederate merchandise.

    Although Wish has a clear policy against symbols of hate, enforcement is uneven.

    In 2019, for example, Wish and Amazon were both forced to apologize after The Auschwitz Museum revealed that the sites were selling Christmas tree ornaments with photos of the concentration camp, as Wired reported.

    Confederate merchandise also remains just one quick search away, including a "Confederate States Cavalry" flag and matching baseball cap, despite the renewed effort to clean up the site.



    Items celebrating the Confederacy continue to be listed at Wish.com, despite a policy prohibiting their sale. Screenshot/Wish.com

    As of Monday night, visitors could also purchase t-shirts, hoodies, and face masks celebrating Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian strongman whom the US concluded used chemical weapons along with indiscriminate bombing campaigns that have killed hundreds of thousands and forced millions of other people to flee their homeland.



    Numerous items featuring Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad are available to purchase at Wish.com.

    Users can also buy t-shirts and cell phone cases featuring Saddam Hussein, who over the summer of 2020 was featured in a seemingly algorithm-driven social media campaign from the company that highlighted a $20 framed photo of the deceased Iraqi dictator.

    A spokesperson for the Los Angeles Lakers, which announced a corporate partnership with Wish in 2017, did not respond to emails requesting comment.

    Businessinsider
    I've never bought anything from them, and 100% for sure never will now.
    "Almost every name belongs to well-known families of English stock....these soldiers were of ancient American lineage"- Prof. N.S. Shaler on the 1st Kentucky "Orphan" Brigade, Confederate States Army

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