Page 20 of 23 FirstFirst ... 10151617181920212223 LastLast
Results 191 to 200 of 228

Thread: Coronavirus/COVID-19: Global Terror

  1. #191
    Senior Member
    Coillearnach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Last Online
    2 Hours Ago @ 05:54 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Anglo-Celtic
    Country
    Confederate States Confederate States
    Gender
    Age
    31
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    Vagrant
    Politics
    Nativism/Nationalism
    Religion
    Summum bonum
    Posts
    352
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    302
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    283
    Thanked in
    137 Posts
    ...Even the deadly SARS virus has escaped — twice — from the Beijing lab where it was being used in experiments. Both were quickly contained, but neither would have happened at all if proper safety precautions had been taken...

    Some Chinese researchers are believed to sell laboratory animals to street vendors after they have finished experimenting on them. You heard me right. Instead of properly disposing of infected animals by cremation, as the law requires, they sell them on the side to make a little extra cash. Or, in some cases, a lot of extra cash. One Beijing researcher, now in jail, made the equivalent of a million dollars selling monkeys and rats on the live animal market, whence they likely wound up in someone’s stomach. Link
    Did COVID-19 escape from a lab? Experts are trending on probably not atm, but the fact remains that someday, somewhere (if current trends continue), something else will.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Coillearnach For This Useful Post:


  3. #192
    Germanique extraordinaire
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Ţoreiđar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Online
    10 Minutes Ago @ 08:23 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Ancestry
    East Norwegian + distant Finnish
    Subrace
    Nordid + reduced CM
    Y-DNA
    I1a1
    Country
    Norway Norway
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Age
    30
    Occupation
    Traditional Craftsman
    Politics
    Family, Nation & Nature
    Religion
    Heathen Worldview
    Posts
    2,545
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2,542
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,554
    Thanked in
    781 Posts
    Europe's odd man out: Sweden refuses to bring in lockdowns despite 2,272 infections, keeps bars open and even ENCOURAGES people to go out

    - Primary schools, restaurants and bars open encouraging people to go outside
    - Dagens Nyheter editor calls for tougher measures or wider Covid-19 testing
    - Prime Minister Stefan Lofven urged people to follow the government's rules
    - Gatherings of 500 people banned - compared to more than two in Britain


    While most of Europe is firmly locked down in a bid to curb the spread of Covid-19, Sweden is taking a softer line, keeping primary schools, restaurants and bars open and even encouraging people to go outside for a nip of air.

    This stands in stark contrast to the urgent tone elsewhere and has sparked heated debate whether Sweden is really doing the right thing. The country has reported more than 2,299 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 41 deaths.

    'We cannot allow the human desperation in Wuhan and Bergamo to be repeated in Sweden. That would be a gamble that violates society's most fundamental principle: that every person has an inherent value,' the editor-in-chief of Sweden's biggest newspaper, Dagens Nyheter, wrote on Sunday, calling for either tougher measures or more widespread coronavirus testing.

    Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, in a televised speech on Sunday, urged people to 'take responsibility' and follow the government's recommendations.



    Those include working from home if you can, staying home if you feel sick, practice social distancing, and stay home if you belong to a risk group or are over the age of 70. Gatherings of more than 500 people have been banned - compared to more than two people in Britain and Germany - and the government has advised secondary schools and universities to close their facilities and conduct classes online.

    Cases of people infected with coronavirus in the UK stands at 8,078 with 422 dead. In Spain, there are 47,610 people infected and some 3,434 dead. Whereas in Germany there are 33,954 people infected and 171 dead.

    On Tuesday, the Swedish government announced that restaurants and bars would only be allowed to provide table service to avoid crowding, but stopped short of actually closing them. Health authorities also urged people to reconsider trips to visit relatives over Easter. But for many, life is carrying on close to normal. Bars and restaurants were full at the weekend, and Stockholm's city buses have been jam-packed at rush hour despite the social distancing recommendations.

    In contrast, neighbouring Norway two weeks ago rolled out the 'most intrusive measures' seen in peacetime, including banning sports and cultural events, and shutting down schools and businesses.

    Sweden's parliament has so far simply fast-tracked a bill allowing for the closure of primary and pre-schools - if deemed necessary. However, in line with the rest with the rest of the European Union, Sweden has shut its borders to non-necessary travel.

    Grilled by media about their apparently relaxed response to the pandemic, Swedish politicians respond that the government will take its cue from experts at the country's Public Health Agency. The agency has yet to call for stricter measures, arguing that the elderly should stay home, not children. 'As soon as the Public Health Agency requests that the government make a decision, we will do it this quickly,' Health Minister Lena Hallengren, snapping her fingers, said earlier this month.

    But not everybody shares the government's faith in the agency, with some accusing it of putting lives at risk. This has led to a stream of vitriol on social media directed at the agency and its main spokesperson, state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell.

    The amount of hateful comments became so overwhelming that the agency's director, Johan Carlson, felt compelled to defend Tegnell, saying: 'I think it's close to unworthy, what he has been subjected to'. The mounting pressure has not changed the authorities' stance that draconian measures are not effective enough to justify their impact on society.

    On Monday, Sweden's former state epidemiologist and current advisor to the World Health Organization (WHO), Johan Giesecke, encouraged Swedes to go out and enjoy the spring sun. 'Bring a friend and walk a metre apart. Don't hug your neighbour. Bring a thermos and sit on a park bench. It's bad for your health to sit at home too,' Giesecke told broadcaster SVT's morning show.

    Right or wrong, Sweden does not seem to have a worse virus problem than its neighbours, according to the numbers of declared cases. Today, Sweden reported 2,299 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, while Norway and Denmark - which each have around half the population of Sweden - reported 2,566 and 1,577 cases, respectively. All Scandinavian countries are however believed to have a big number of unknown cases as testing is only being done on patients with severe symptoms.


    _________________________
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...oing-pint.html
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Ţoreiđar For This Useful Post:


  5. #193
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Siebenbürgerin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Transylvanian Saxon
    Subrace
    Alpinid/Baltid
    State
    Transylvania Transylvania
    Location
    Hermannstadt
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Ethno-Cultural
    Religion
    Lutheran
    Posts
    2,752
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    231
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    449
    Thanked in
    218 Posts
    In Romania there is a nationwide lockdown. It now looks like in times of war on the streets. Through a military ordinance, the movement outside the homes has become prohibited, with some exceptions (work, buying food or medicine etc). The police and the army are out stopping and controlling peoples for papers. Those who work need a written declaration from their employer. They also need to inform the authorities which is their route to home and whether they stop for shopping and where. It's not allowed to deviate from the established route. The elderly (those over 65 years of age) are only allowed to go out between 11 and 13 every day for necessary shopping etc. Everyone else who goes out is only allowed for exceptions (shopping, medical emergencies, etc) and also needs to have papers (a personal declaration). There is a curfew after 22 and until 6 morning time. Peoples who don't respect these rules receive fines. Peoples coming from abroad get automatically placed in a quarantine.

    Unfortunately some hospitals and medical personnel got infected because of poor management. Some peoples didn't respect the quarantines so now the punishments are stricter. Those who get others sick or endanger their lives can face prison time. The sentences for looting and other similar crimes have also been made stricter to discourage the peoples.

    The official number of cases is nearing towards the 1000s and the death toll is currently 17. But probably there are many more undiscovered sickly as well as many peoples who struggle with their lives. In some cities like Bucharest they plan to do a door to door testing. But it's probably not going to be widely available everywhere. Peoples in the rural areas sometimes have problem to respect the restrictions imposed.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Siebenbürgerin For This Useful Post:


  7. #194
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Nachtengel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Posts
    6,101
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    148
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    947
    Thanked in
    519 Posts
    Why is Covid-19 death rate so low in Germany?

    As Covid-19 closes in on the United States, physicians and epidemiologists and crystal ball spinners are trying to forecast just how bad things might get. Right now, cases are already in the tens of thousands and climbing every day. The enormous costs to society and to individuals seem too staggering to comprehend.

    The number of deaths, however, is the most important measure to define where this pandemic settles in the grim lineup of previous catastrophic infectious diseases. Worldwide, more than 4% of patients—nearing 19,000 -- have died, with many more to come, and each death its own heartbreaking story.

    As of this past weekend, nine countries had diagnosed more than 9,000 cases, and three -- South Korea, Switzerland, and Germany -- had deaths rates well below the others. For South Korea, this in part is due to the cases occurring in much younger people, while the information in Switzerland is only now emerging.

    But for Germany, Covid-19 is being diagnosed in the same middle-aged people as other countries. The deaths in Germany also fit the seemingly established pattern of also occurring among the very old.

    Yet even with similar populations of infected patients as, for example, France, Spain and the US, the German Covid-19 mortality rate is about 0.4%

    What are the Germans doing right?

    Recent articles have raised this issue with several theories put forth by local experts. Some feel that it is a temporary situation, since Germany, like South Korea, has been aggressively testing its population from the outset. Aggressive testing likely will identify persons otherwise too well to come to medical attention, thereby diluting the tested pool with a large set of infected but otherwise well people who are likely to remain so.

    German authorities are concerned that, in the coming weeks, the wave of the very sick will appear in Germany, too, leading to a rising mortality rate. Perhaps.

    Others have speculated that the first cases in Germany were older adults who had used an early spring vacation to go skiing in countries that turned out to have high rates of Covid-19. So yes, goes this thinking: the German cases are in older persons, but all were well enough to ski, that is, they were people without the various other medical conditions that increase risk of death.

    There might be other explanations. With any infection, there are four basic questions to ask when looking at broad differences in death rates.

    1. Is the virus different here versus there? NO. Right now, there is no evidence that the virus is mutating toward a more potent strain in the US.
    2. Is one country diagnosing the virus sooner than another? YES. As above, this may be skewing German and South Korean results by identifying asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic persons unlikely to require medical care. Hospitalization rates by country, currently not tracked, would help sort out the contribution of aggressive testing to survival rates.
    3. Is the infected patient different here versus there? YES. South Korea (young patients) and Italy (old patients) are unique in the outbreak, and the characteristics in Iran are not well known. All other countries with specific information, from China to even the US epicenter of New York City, have shown the same basic distribution with respect to age, sex (more men than women) and smoking.
    4. Is the health care system different here versus there? OH YES. Health care system differences at the country level are hard to examine: information is sparse and, given the 50,000-foot view, possibly misleading. However, health care experts typically can rely on "structural measures" to determine the quality of a hospital or a state or a country.


    These measures are used in the well regarded US News and World Report hospital ranking system and include easily gathered information such as staffing ratios, education level of practitioners and number of specialists and specialty beds, including those in an intensive care unit.

    The World Bank tracks health care information by country on three relevant structural measures (though recentness of information varies country to country), each measured per 1,000 general population: doctors, nurses and hospital beds. They and other sources also track two other relevant variables: lifespan per country and health care spending per individual. Neither of these demonstrate differences in affected Western European countries that might explain a difference in Covid-19 survival.

    Furthermore, longevity, which may reflect facility with management of chronic conditions such as hypertension or diabetes as well as diet, is about two years higher in Italy, Spain, and France than Germany, which ranks 27th in the world.

    Structural measures, however, may provide insight. Higher doctor and hospital bed numbers don't vary meaningfully, but one variable stands out: Nurses per 1,000 people in the general population.
    Nurses.

    Among the nine countries with the highest number of Covid-19 cases, the country that has the highest nurse rate also has the lowest death rate from the disease. Germany has 13.2 nurses per 1,000 (echoing a trend for high nurse numbers throughout Northern Europe) far above the other heavily Covid-19 affected countries.

    This may be just another armchair epidemiologist observation of course. But higher numbers of nurses may reflect one of two beneficial factors (or both): first, that nurses, the backbone of hospital (and especially ICU) care, are essential to patient management and, ultimately, survival.

    The second is that the sort of hospital or country that knows the value of nurses also is a hospital or country that understands how to deliver effective health care and has likely made countless other unmeasured adjustments to improve quality.

    Either way, it is a reminder that Covid-19 will continue to reveal the strengths and weaknesses of health care systems across the world. The current observed differences also mandate that, when we finally are out from underneath the weight of the current crisis, we must work to determine how we can deliver better health care to large populations across the world.
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/24/o...itz/index.html

  8. #195
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Last Online
    1 Minute Ago @ 08:32 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-Saxon
    Ancestry
    British Isles, Germany
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Age
    26
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Anti-Judaist
    Religion
    Logos
    Posts
    721
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    64
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    105
    Thanked in
    56 Posts
    A must watch for all, especially skeptics.

    Coronavirus: Listening To (And Rebutting) The Critics

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to leRoux For This Useful Post:


  10. #196

    How coronavirus is transmitted


    There are 1,564 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Ireland with nine deaths attributed to the disease. Worldwide, there have been more than 447,000 confirmed cases and 20,599 deaths.


    The epicentre of the disease has moved from China to Europe, and the World Health Organization has warned that the US could be next, after a "very large acceleration" in the number of cases there.


    In Ireland, we've been living under a strange new reality since around St Patrick's Day, learning the language of social distancing, now physical distancing, not to mention how to cope with dramatically altered family lives. With the help of countless charts, multiple memes and daily briefings, we're all (hopefully) becoming experts on coughing and sneezing etiquette (into your elbow like Batman, or even better, into a disposable tissue), proper handwashing and keeping our distance.


    This last part is crucial because by keeping our distance from our friends, neighbours, colleagues and communities, we can help prevent the virus transmitting from person to person. It’s also encouraging to hear that of the people testing positive for coronavirus in recent days, they’re showing fewer confirmed contacts than previously, down from 20 close contacts to just five. This means that people are taking the Government’s measures seriously, and are limiting their contacts to their own households, where possible.


    But the disease is still spreading at various rates throughout the world.



    Before we look at how coronavirus spreads, lets remember that 80% of people who do get the virus will have a mild illness and make a full recovery. The World Health Organization says: "Most people infected with the Covid-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment. However, "older people, and those with underlying medical problems like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and cancer are more likely to develop serious illness." They're the people we want to do everything to protect.


    Furthermore, the disease can be asymptomatic, meaning the infected person displays no symptoms at all, or in the early stages of infection. Those people can spread the disease unknowingly, particularly if they're not practising physical distancing. In a paper published last week, scientists from Columbia University in New York examined early infections in China and found that high amounts of undocumented infection facilitated the rapid spread of coronavirus. This is where people had no symptoms or very mild symptoms and had not been tested, and went on to infect others unknowingly. The scientists estimated that "86% of all infections were undocumented prior to (the imposition of) 23 January 2020 travel restrictions." So, it’s key to remember that not just obviously sick people are a danger to others.


    How does coronavirus spread?


    According to the Health Service Executive's own advice, coronavirus is spread in sneeze or cough droplets. To infect you, it has to get from an infected person's nose or mouth into your eyes, nose or mouth. It’s not an airborne disease (like measles for example) but is transmitted through fluids. You can either inhale the droplets that a person coughs or sneezes, or you might even breathe in tiny droplets that someone emits when speaking, that’s why it's so important to stay around two metres or six feet away from people.


    The WHO also points out that when an infected person coughs, sneezes or even breathes, tiny drops of saliva can land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch Covid-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. This is why it's so important to wash your hands properly and often.


    How long does the virus last on surfaces?


    According to the WHO, it is not certain how long the virus that causes Covid-19 survives on surfaces, but it seems to behave like other coronaviruses. Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on the Covid-19 virus) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions (e.g. type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment). If you think a surface may be infected, clean it with simple disinfectant to kill the virus and protect yourself and others. Clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, or nose. Obviously, you can't go around disinfecting everything you touch, how would you go shopping for food, for example. So that’s why it's so important to wash your hands when you come home from essential trips outside.




    RTÉ News spoke to Sam McConkey, infectious diseases specialist at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, who answers some basic questions about coronavirus.




    1
    We know that the virus is spread from an infected person who coughs or sneezes, but what about their breath?

    If someone is speaking loudly or animatedly - it's called forceful speaking - the vibrations of their vocal cords can create droplets in the air which can either fall to the ground or a nearby surface or they can be inhaled by a person nearby. That's why we’re all advised to stay two metres away from others outside our household. It’s not the case if you’re speaking softly and gently.


    We’re all familiar with the image of the sun illuminating the drops when we cough and sneeze - that’s what you want to avoid doing and breathing in.The droplets from a cough or sneeze are a bit bigger than the tiny airborne particles from speaking forcefully, and they fall down to the ground relatively quickly. The difficulty there is when our fingers pick up the virus particles and then we touch door handles or we touch our eyes, nose and mouth. Shaking hands is also a huge no-no for the same reason.



    2 I read an article that said the saliva of Covid-19 patients can harbour half a trillion virus particles per teaspoon, and a cough aerosolises it into a diffuse mist. That sounds scary, is that accurate?


    "Yes, the teaspoon analogy is ok - in infections with Hepatitis B, for example, a teaspoon of blood would have a similar amount of virus particles in it - it does sound like a lot of virus - but that's standard" (in infectious diseases).


    Prof McConkey says it doesn’t take much for a small particle to get into your system, but we don’t yet know how much it takes to infect someone. Generally, one particle isn’t enough. Some of them are mutating so some of the particles are blanks – so if half a trillion virus particles are present in a teaspoon of saliva that doesn’t mean you could infect half a trillion people - it might take 100 or 1,000 particles to infect a person because some parts of the virus might not be able to infect people. But all in all, that figure of half a trillion particles in a teaspoon sounds about right.



    3 How long does the virus last on a surface?

    Prof McConkey says he read an article about the Diamond Princess cruise ship on which 800 of 3,000 passengers were infected with Covid-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US found that 17 days later there was still some virus detectable on surfaces. Now whether that was still infectious, we'll never know, but it still was present. It’s safe to say it survives from between one to multiple days.


    Prof McConkey says we must continually go back to the basic reproductive rate of coronavirus.


    The R0, as it's called, is estimated to be from 2.2 to 2.8 - so each individual case will infect that many secondary infections, i.e. one person infects around two people. Obviously, those people then infect four people, then eight people then 16, so it's an exponential epidemic. What we are trying to do is bring that rate to less than one. This would mean that the curve we’re all trying so hard to flatten goes down and the outbreak fizzles out.


    "That doesn't mean the reproductive rate has to go to zero tomorrow, but if it’s reduced to less than one, the transmission slowly fizzles out - that’s what they’ve done in China, South Korea and Singapore - they’ve changed human contact enough to achieve an R0 of less than one."





    Prof McConkey says if you can do that then the size of the area below the curve decreases - so you’re not just flattening the curve - you're decreasing the total number of people who will be infected. The worst case scenario is where we reach the peak of infection all at once, better is flattening the curve out so the daily number of infections is stretched out. But Prof McConkey says it’s even better still if we can all get so good at physical distancing that each case of Covid-19 infects less than one person.



    4 I know the WHO advice is not to wear a mask, but should I cover my mouth with a scarf if I'm less than two metres away from someone outside the house?

    Prof McConkey says people probably shouldn't be out if they’re worried about that. With our current guidelines, the advice is don’t go out where you’re closer than two metres or six feet to people.



    5 Should I disinfect my groceries after I come home from food shopping?


    "We all hope our groceries haven't been pawed over," Prof McConkey says, and he isn’t disinfecting his. "Obviously if someone sneezes on them that’s not great, but it gets very difficult if you have to disinfect everything that comes into the house" Again, the advice is wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your face.


    Prof McConkey says what you eat goes into your stomach, and the virus is killed by your stomach acids, but he stresses that food isn't so much the issue in this case. "The quality of food in Ireland is generally very, very high - we're very lucky in that regard, food handlers generally have high levels of training and hygiene, so people needn’t worry so much about food."


    He also points out that fear of food shortages is misplaced. "In Ireland we produce about 4-5 times more food than we consume. We'll have enough food - especially cheese, porridge, milk, beef - we'll be ok. There may be some changes to our food, but we’ll be ok."


    Prof McConkey jokes that coronavirus won't cause a toilet roll or food problem at all. He says it is a huge problem but not of that kind.



    6. Should I take my shoes off when I come into my house from outside?



    If you sneeze, those droplets end up on the ground. At present we haven't been doing major disinfecting of our feet so it's a reasonable thing to consider. Droplets can end up on the floor, so it could be a good idea. When it comes to shoe hygiene - a disinfectant mat might be better, like what you see in a swimming pool. However, this is not something that the experts here have considered as essential. Prof McConkey says the foot and mouth disease approach (where people’s shoes were disinfected by mats doused in disinfectant) might be a good idea down the road. It's not unreasonable. However, he stresses that he’s not doing it himself at present.


    He points out that while shoes may be a source of infection, a lot of the transmission in China was within households, 70-80%. It was that sort of close contact where people share cutlery, towels, beds. "It seems intimate contact was the problem, it wasn't a problem of brushing elbows at the traffic lights with strangers, it's a more intimate infection."


    Prof McConkey says we do live in families for the most part - so that’s hard to eliminate - we are family units. The question is, can we keep each family unit separate from other family units as much as possible? That's why experts are advocating no unnecessary social contact.




    RTE Aertel: How Coronavirus is transmitted


    26 III 2020.

  11. #197
    Germania incognita
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,112
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,152
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    844
    Thanked in
    380 Posts
    China angry over coronavirus cartoon in Danish newspaper


    Name:  52180523_303.jpg
Views: 40
Size:  36.3 KB



    Denmark's Jyllands-Posten printed a cartoon of the Chinese flag with virus-like figures in place of the symbolic yellow stars. China is demanding an apology from the paper, which has previously waded into controversy.



    https://www.dw.com/en/china-angry-ov...per/a-52196383

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Hersir For This Useful Post:


  13. #198

    Frighten the shit out of people and they will do what you want - id2020






    Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates will launch human-implantable capsules that have ‘digital certificates’ which can show who has been tested for the coronavirus and who has been vaccinated against it. The 64 year old tech mogul and currently the second richest person in the world, revealed this yesterday during a
    Reddit ‘Ask Me Anything’ session while answering questions on the COVID-19 Coronavirus Pandemic.



    Gates was responding to a question on how businesses will be able to operate while maintaining social distancing, and said that, “Eventually we will have some digital certificates to show who has recovered or been tested recently or when we have a vaccine who has received it.” The ‘digital certificates’ Gates was referring to are human-implantable ‘QUANTUM-DOT TATTOOS’ that researchers at MIT and Rice University are working on as a way to hold vaccination records. It was last year in December when scientists from the two universities revealed that they were working on these quantum-dot tattoos after Bill Gates approached them about solving the problem of identifying those who have not been vaccinated.



    The quantum-dot tattoos involve applying dissolvable sugar-based microneedles that contain a vaccine and fluorescent copper-based ‘quantum dots’ embedded inside biocompatible, micron-scale capsules. After the microneedles dissolve under the skin, they leave the encapsulated quantum dots whose patterns can be read to identify the vaccine that was administered. The quantum-dot tattoos will likely be supplemented with Bill Gates’ other undertaking called ID2020, which is an ambitious project by Microsoft to solve the problem of over 1 billion people who live without an officially recognized identity. ID2020 is solving this through digital identity. Currently, the most feasible way of implementing digital identity is either through smartphones or RFID microchip implants. The latter will be Gates’s likely approach not only because of feasibility and sustainability, but also because for over 6 years, the Gates Foundationhas been funding another project that incorporates human-implantable microchip implants. This project, also spearheaded by MIT, is a birth control microchip implant that will allow women to control contraceptive hormones in their bodies.



    As for ID2020, to see it through, Microsoft has formed an alliance with four other companies, namely; Accenture, IDEO, Gavi, and the Rockefeller Foundation. The project is supported by the United Nations and has been incorporated into the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals initiative.



    It will be interesting to see how Bill Gates and ID2020 will execute all this because many Christians, and surprisingly a growing number of Shia Muslims, are very opposed to the idea of microchipping and any form of body-invasive identification technology. Some Christian legislators and politicians in the United States have even tried to ban all forms of human microchipping.


    But, on the other hand, this is Bill Gates’ perfect opportunity to see the projects through because as the Coronavirus continues to spread and more people continue to die from the pandemic, the public at large is becoming more open to problem-solving technologies that will contain the spread of the virus.



    BILL GATES WILL USE MICROCHIP IMPLANTS TO FIGHT CORONAVIRUS
    26 III 2020.


    Globalist Gates is only concerned about control not human welfare.

  14. #199
    Senior Member Verđandi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Last Online
    Wednesday, September 12th, 2018 @ 02:42 PM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Country
    Luxembourg Luxembourg
    Location
    Asgĺrd
    Gender
    Age
    36
    Family
    Two sisters
    Occupation
    Wyrd-weaver
    Posts
    1,236
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    263
    Thanked in
    161 Posts

    Two Hundred and Thirty Years of Rights and Liberties Shredded: Why I Oppose The Lockdown



    Although it was nearly twenty years ago, I can remember 9/11 like it was yesterday. I remember the shock of hearing about the planes crashing into towers, at first believing it was a tragic accident and quickly learning it to be otherwise. I remember being told that 19 hijackers, part of a fundamentalist plot to destroy America, were behind the attacks and that the mastermind was a man in a cave in Afghanistan named Osama bin Laden.

    As all of America was glued to their television screens, many rushed out to give blood in an effort to at least do something to help one another. George W. Bush’s answer for Americans was to go to work and then go out and shop. Americans dutifully complied. But the government’s answer, in tandem with mainstream media, was also to be afraid. Very afraid. Americans also complied with this request, perhaps more than any other.

    In the days and weeks after the initial shock, a college professor informed me about a bill called the PATRIOT ACT that would essentially eviscerate much of the Constitution and Bill of Rights. After class, I questioned him further about the bill, which he explained, and suggested that if I really wanted to understand what was happening, I should read 1984 by George Orwell. I went home and did just that and was surprised to learn that not only was he right, but that I was watching what I was reading happen in front of me in real life.

    I watched as the fear of speaking your mind and saying certain words became known as freedom. I watched as Americans came to assume that their communications were listened to, frightened of what they said, but justifying it as they praised their country for being unlike the totalitarian governments of the past. Peace became war. Any suggestion that invading Afghanistan was wrong was unpatriotic. In fact, any criticism of the government was considered unpatriotic and anyone who valued freedom over temporary security was borderline a traitor.

    More...

  15. #200
    Germania incognita
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,112
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,152
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    844
    Thanked in
    380 Posts
    JTA — Nearly 5% of all coronavirus-related deaths in the United Kingdom are of Jewish people, who make up just 0.3% of the country’s population, the Jewish News of London reported.

    According to the paper’s report Thursday, at least 22 Jewish families have lost loved ones to the disease, which has killed 465 people in the United Kingdom. The UK has about 66 million residents and 250,000 Jews.
    https://www.timesofisrael.com/nearly...ad-are-jewish/






    We received some info at work today, a COVID-19 is different than the seasonal flues because many patients develop pneumonia. SARS-CoV-2 is easy to kill, soap and water is enough to remove the membrane of the virus. Antibacterial hand-sanitizer with alcohol also works well. (I saw there was some "halal alcohol free hand sanitizer" being sold online, these people will keep spreading the virus and killing people)



    If you wear a mask, it's important to remove it from the back, so you don't potentially contaminate yourself by removing it from the front. Professor said a mask is only needed if you're closer than one meter to other people. We try to keep some distance at work, but we're often closer than that. Everyone is washing hands regularly with hand sanitizer or soap and water, so I am not too worried. If you have to cough or sneeze, do it in the elbow or in a paper which you discard immediately after. And then wash your hands.

    The grocery stores here has installed dispensers with hand sanitizers and some plexiglass in front of the cashier.
    People are recommended not to touch goods they are not buying, but I am sure many are not heeding that advice.

    I commute by bus to work, if I get sick it's most likely either from the bus or at the grocery store. I am not too worried and remember to wash my hands.
    Try to be aware of not touching your face if you have unclean hands, if you're worried.

    I try to limit shopping a lot more than before. In recent years some stores have opened for the option of home delivery for a fee, it's gotten very popular in the last weeks.

    One pack of twenty 1-gram C-vitamin fizz tablets are now 100 NOK (9.61 USD / 8.73 euros) here. You could get five for 100 NOK in Sweden before all this.
    I eat oranges, kiwi or lemon for some extra vitamins.

  16. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Hersir For This Useful Post:


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •