Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 456789
Results 81 to 84 of 84

Thread: Are There Any Benefits to Marriage for Men?

  1. #81
    Senior Administrator
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Aeternitas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Libertarian
    Religion
    Christian
    Posts
    1,562
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    68
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    579
    Thanked in
    189 Posts
    These may or may not apply depending on where one lives and marries:

    Legal benefits: the status of next-of-kin for hospital visits, the ability to make medical decisions in the event that your spouse becomes sick or incapacitated. You may have the legal right to sue for malpractice/wrongful death of a spouse and have decision-making power with respect to how and where should their remains be buried or disposed of. Since spouses qualify as next-of-kin they can inherit their partner's assets in the absence of a legal will. In a court of law, married couples may invoke spousal privilege. This includes spousal communications privilege and spousal testimonial privilege (spouses cannot be forced to testify against each other).

    Custodial benefits: married fathers enjoy automatic parental rights and may be more likely to be awarded shared custody as opposed to unwed fathers. Unwed fathers who never legally acknowledged paternity have no parental or custody rights. If you are married and the mother dies, you also have an automatic right to custody, what may not necessarily be true for unwed fathers.

    Tax benefits: You may qualify for estate tax marital deduction as well as gift tax marital deduction, i.e. you or your spouse may transfer an unlimited amount of assets to each other at any time without having to pay any tax. You may also inherit an entire estate from your spouse without tax consequences. Filing taxes jointly may earn you more deductions and other tax benefits depending on situation (e.g. you may pay a lower total tax if one of the spouses earns significantly less).

    Employment benefits: employers frequently choose to extend benefits to their employees' spouses as part of the working arrangement. Married employees get more paid time off than their single counterparts including family, medical, and pregnancy leave, bereavement leave, days off for the birth of a child, and receive more employer contributions to their healthcare and pension plans. Spouses may also receive worker's compensation/lost wages on behalf of an incapacitated or deceased spouse.

    Health insurance benefits: if you're married, you can usually get on your spouse's health insurance and get a family rate, which may be more advantageous than each of the spouses having their own health insurance. This is particularly helpful if one of the spouses doesn't have health insurance through their own employer, is self- or unemployed.

    Social security benefits: spouses may have the option of filing for a spousal benefit, which gives them the potential to collect up to 50% of the other spouse's benefit amount. This is particularly advantageous for stay-at-home spouses, non-working spouses or spouses who have the lower income of the two on average.

    Misc. financial benefits: As a married couple, you are seen as a unit which may give you advantages when loaning, renting, leasing or purchasing assets. Some companies may not want two unrelated parties on a mortgage or require higher deposits or downpayments as extra security. Two spouses, on the other hand, who have a combined income and a legal reason to stay together are a mortgage lender's ideal customer. Same goes for insurance companies. Being married may also advantage you when applying for a larger loan. Joint bank accounts and credit cards may help both spouses build credit.

    On average, married men work harder, smarter, and more successfully than bachelors. They enjoy a greater job stability as well as more assets. According to studies, marriage increases the earning power of men on the order of 10 to 24%. Research also found that 70% of top male earners in the US have a spouse who stays at home. And not only do married men earn more, they also save more. Stably married men have much greater wealth than their unmarried peers and are also in much better financial shape by the time they reach retirement. The typical 50-something married man has 3x the assets of his unmarried counterpart.

    Physical and emotional health benefits: Studies have found that married men are generally healthier, have a lower risk of depression and a higher likelihood of satisfaction with life in retirement than men who were never married or whose marriages ended in divorce or widowhood. Being married has also been linked to better cognitive function, a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, better sleep, improved blood sugar levels, and better outcomes for hospitalized patients, including better cancer survival. As a result, married men tend to live longer than bachelors. Marriage also seems to be linked to a lowered risk of (domestic) violence. Studies found that cohabitants are 3x more likely to engage in domestic violence than their married counterparts.

    According to surveys, 51% of married men reported they were emotionally satisfied with their sex lives, compared to 39% of cohabiting men and 36% of the singles. Unmarried men also have greater testosterone reductions than those who are married. Marriage also significantly increases sexual fidelity. Cohabiting men are 4x more likely to cheat than husbands, and cohabiting women are 8x more likely to cheat than wives.

    Finally, marriage has been found to be more advantageous for children. The relationship between married parents generally differs from that of an unwed/cohabiting couple and has substantial consequences for both the couple and the children. Unwed parents for instance have a lower level of commitment and less of an assumption of permanence - it is, after all, much easier to walk away; and since there were no vows to begin with, the expectations are also different. According to studies, unwed parents are 50% more likely to break up than their married counterparts. Just 1 out of 10 cohabiting couples are still cohabiting after 5 years. Children of married couples tend to be more academically successful, more emotionally stable, and more often assume leadership roles. Children with married parents also have the lowest odds of poverty out of all family arrangements.

    Here is a podcast (available with transcript) expanding more on the benefits of marriage, complete with resources: The Art of Manliness - The Surprising Benefits of Marriage for Men

    Anyway, as far as the benefits go, marriage is not only meant to benefit the individual (and it's not a wise idea to marry solely or primarily for the sake of those benefits anyway; they're advantageous to have, of course, but for a marriage to last it needs a more solid foundation than that). Marriage is, after all, not only a private agreement between spouses, but also a civil institution of public interest. Without this aspect, we wouldn't need the state, the church or the community to formalize in the first place. Traditionally, marriage was defined as a union between a man and a woman who share a domestic life oriented towards procreation and preservation/continuity of the family line. Individual satisfaction, while still highly desirable in a marriage, was however not its one and only defining feature. The modern purpose of marriage on the other hand is mere personal fulfillment or convenience. When viewed in this light, there is no particular reason why marriage ought to permanent, monogamous or even between a man and a woman. After all, emotional connections come and go, and a relationship that is fulfilling one year might not be the next. If marriage is only about the self, why would we stick around when things get tough? And since people can get personal fulfillment from other types of relationships, the only thing that distinguishes marriage in their eyes is the fact that it comes with a piece of paper.

    It's not just a piece of paper though. Marriage is a transformative act, changing the way two people look at each other, at the future, and at their roles in society. And it changes the way others - from family to local community and society as a whole - look at and treat the couple in return. This is why marriage (in the traditional sense) is important and essential for society. Many of today's societal problems are rooted in selfishness and moral relativism. At its core, marriage goes back to the simple principle of two people, a husband and wife, working together for a noble cause. It provides an opportunity to grow in selflessness as one lives not only for oneself, but also for their spouse and children. And where families learn to work together as a team, so can communities. The strength of any nation - from America to Germany to South Africa to Australia - lies in its families.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Aeternitas For This Useful Post:


  3. #82
    Active Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    KYAnglo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Last Online
    5 Hours Ago @ 11:39 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    England/Britain
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    R1b>U106>L48
    mtDNA
    H3af
    Country
    Confederate States Confederate States
    State
    Kentucky Kentucky
    Location
    The Pennyrile
    Gender
    Family
    Single parent
    Occupation
    Paying the bills
    Politics
    Confederate
    Religion
    Folkish Heathen
    Posts
    918
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    327
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    415
    Thanked in
    277 Posts
    This is why marriage (in the traditional sense) is important and essential for society. Many of today's societal problems are rooted in selfishness and moral relativism.
    You're absolutely correct, in my opinion. I was personally of the traditional outlook in my marriage, and to condense\over-simplify things, my ex-wife much more the selfish relativist in our later years.
    "Almost every name belongs to well-known families of English stock....these soldiers were of ancient American lineage"- Prof. N.S. Shaler on the 1st Kentucky "Orphan" Brigade, Confederate States Army

  4. #83
    Moderator
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Blod og Jord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Danish
    Ancestry
    Danish, German
    Country
    Denmark Denmark
    Gender
    Age
    40
    Family
    Married parent
    Politics
    Nationalism
    Religion
    Odinism
    Posts
    778
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    239
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    536
    Thanked in
    301 Posts
    I think in general married men become more committed and loyal to their families, the marriage is an opportunity to mature them. My partner and I cohabited for a while and even had our first child together without being married but then we decided to officialize it. We already considered ourselves married without the piece of paper so we didn't need it in that sense but then we thought it also doesn't hurt to get it. There's something about marriage which make it sound more permanent and serious than a regular relationship.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Blod og Jord For This Useful Post:


  6. #84
    Roslagen til Danelagen
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Rodskarl Dubhgall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Vínsk
    Ancestry
    Engelsk (Autosomal), Uppland (Y-DNA) och Dalarna (mtDNA)
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    R-BY30613
    mtDNA
    K2A5A1
    Country
    Vinland Vinland
    State
    Kentucky Kentucky
    Location
    Nya-Sverige
    Gender
    Age
    38
    Zodiac Sign
    Leo
    Family
    Married parent
    Occupation
    Väring och Víking
    Politics
    Munsöätten
    Religion
    Forn Sed
    Posts
    3,847
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    8,971
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    412
    Thanked in
    359 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Idis View Post
    Obviously, however paternity tests do not automatically grant someone custody. The biological father has no specific rights until a court gives them to him after judicially ruling that he is the father and has parental rights. Of course a paternity test will be required but going the court's way may be a tedious process. Legally speaking, married fathers have the biggest advantage when it comes to parental rights.
    Paternity tests hardly work in a father's favour. Always a gaming of the system, but fathers do that too.

Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 456789

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Friday, July 5th, 2019, 06:14 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Saturday, July 8th, 2017, 11:04 AM
  3. Ladies' Men: Great for Sex, But Not for Marriage
    By Phlegethon in forum Men, Women, & Relationships
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Sunday, November 16th, 2003, 08:29 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •