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Thread: How Expensive is It to Raise Children?

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    Senior Member Next World's Avatar
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    Cutting the Cost of Children

    This is a thread I started on the forum I used to Admin for. The basic concept is to list methods which will reduce the financial cost of child-rearing. Obviously, low-birthrates are a large concern amongst our community. A lot of people excuse a lack of children with what they consider a lack of proper funding.

    Feel free to add anything you can think of that would help.


    Cutting the Cost of Children


    Breast-feeding. I think it's pretty self-explanatory as to why breast-feeding infants would save you money on raising children, even if it's only half of the time. For those of you who are on the slower side, baby formula costs a lot more than breast milk (breast milk is usually considered free, as a woman's body produces it Naturally when she's pregnant, although I do consider it an indirect cost, because a woman needs to be well-nourished in order for the milk to be adequate).

    Cloth diapers. Babies pass waste about as often as they eat, they eat more often than most adults, as they're growing a lot more so need a steadier supply of materials, and they have yet to be acculturated to our society's bizarre and unnatural eating and excreting "schedules" and "trends". It might seem yucky to wash and re-use cloth diapers, but it will save you a lot of money, provided you keep the baby clean and wash everything well. Plus... what would YOU rather wear? I'm sure if whatever sort of weird fibers were more comfortable against the skin, we'd be wearing them as grown-ups. Another plus side is that cloth diapers are better for the environment. Why waste so much for the sake of collecting waste?

    Second-hand stores.Yet again, this may seem "yucky", and I won't lie. There are plenty of things in second hand stores that you should not buy. Whatever you get you should check out very carefully and clean and disinfect thoroughly before giving it to your child. I personally would never buy a stuffed animal or something else of that Nature at a second hand store because things "soak in" to such materials, and they can't be easily washed. If you find a cute stuffed toy that can go in the washing machine without being damaged, sure, get it, but be weary. Make sure clothing is made of durable material and doesn't have holes in it. Plastic toys shouldn't be chewed on or broken, but they can be easily cleaned. If you're looking at any sort of furniture, for a nursery or otherwise, my advice is this: shake it. I know it sounds funny and will probably get you a few stares, but it's better to know that a piece of furniture can take an adult shaking it than getting a surprise when your baby gets to the shaking and poking and pushing and shoving stage because you "assumed" it'd be fine.

    Family Networks/Baby Drives. Don't be afraid to ask for help! You're helping our people by making more babies, we want to help by making sure these babies live healthy lifestyles. If you need something, let us know. If you have something to offer, such as old baby clothes (if you're "retiring"), feel free to donate such things as well, it'll help out other parents-to-be and their babies.

    Save Change. People think it's silly, but we've discussed it here before. When you break a bill, put the change in your pocket, bring it home, and shove it in a piggy bank. If you all ready have children and are hoping to have more, you can ask them to contribute coins they find to "the baby fund", so that they can help "buy a baby". I know families that have done this, and the children who have helped pay for the baby feel very achieved, as if they are partially responsible for bringing the baby into the world, and in a sense, they are. I'm aware that plenty of folks all ready keep a jar to go toward activism, but this is very important activism, so I ask them to consider that. Plus, what's more fun, holding signs or making babies?

    Fundraisers. No, I'm not joking. Everybody always thinks I'm joking. European people--we bake. We do bread, we do brownies, we do biscotti and all sorts of other things. Have a bake sale, yard sale, tag sale, and put the proceeds towards bringing someone new into the gene pool and world. Get ideas from your kids' schools. It's perfectly legal to resell things that you buy in bulk, plenty of people make money off of wholesale. Some seniors at our school were able to raise enough money from selling candy they bought at Costco to pay for their and their dates' tickets for their prom (over a hundred dollars a piece in a matter of weeks). Do you have a skill or talent? Sell hand-made European crafts, you'll raise money for a baby and promote our culture at the same time. If you have the time and you play an instrument, speak a foreign language, have academic talents, or know a trade, offer classes. Many cities have places where you can offer a class to the public and get paid for it, I know because that's how I learned to paint landscapes and seascapes, use earthenware clay, and various other things. You could also offer individual lessons or tutoring. Make sure you check the legality of what you plan to do first, but most of the respected music instructors around here started that way. Yet again, you'll be raising money for a new human, and promoting and teaching our culture.

    Learn basic homeopathy. This is especially good if you don't have insurance. Obviously there are some instances when you should go to the doctor, if you are a parent, hopefully you know how to make such discretions. Homeopathy is in general a safer, healthier, and cheaper alternative to modern medicine, for adults and children. There are many books on the subject available to the public.

    Become shopping savvy. It's okay to clip coupons. We won't laugh at you. Compare price per weight. Learn the differences between store brands and name brands, if you don't know if something is worth the money, try it out, and try out the competition. Check bottom shelves for good deals and items on the right sides of shelves (you can tell the orientation by the text on products). These products pay less for advertising, so they are usually cheaper. Be careful in buying cheaper products though, know that sometimes you should pay more. For example, frozen or fresh veggies are better than canned, as canned usually have way too much added sodium. Learn what you can buy in bulk reasonably (ie, if you don't have a meat freezer, it's probably not smart to buy 40lbs of steak unless you're having a HUGE barbeque).

    Prioritize and categorize. Do you really need everything you have? What is most important to you out of the things you have, what is most necessary, and what would still be important and necessary with a child around? Most of us claim we don't watch TV, and hopefully the more children you have, the less TV you watch, but if you don't need it, why not sell it? Or why pay for cable or your "dish" If you don't watch TV? A TV and VCR/DVDR is a good idea for rainy days, but would you be able to occupy yourself with a book instead? Or perhaps you could play a board game with the kids? I know that our family has a "text consumption" problem. My mom buys at least 40 new books per year, and then she doesn't read half of them. Look at your lifestyle and decide what is better for you--sporadic purchasing of magazines, or a subscription? A video rental card, or buying every movie you want to see? Buying every book you want to read, or visiting the library more often and have them order books they don't have on hand for you, rather than having the bookstore do it? It all depends upon your personal lifestyle. I know my mother would be better off just using the free library, because she barely touches the books she reads, while I need to purchase most books I read, because I take notes and dog-ear and highlight (I'm more of a non-fiction girl...) everything, and the library doesn't really appreciate that. Don't be afraid to use public services, they're there for a reason. Some days it might be cheaper to ride the bus to work than to pay for gas, if it's safe, you should give it a try. Yet again, this changes on a person to person basis.

    Proper Diet & Hygiene. Your children AND you. These two things have been associated with good health for a long time, and now, with recent studies linking dental care to heart disease, it reinforces the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure (although you get charged MUCH more for the cure!). It is best to eat Natural, whole foods, and if possible, you should make your family's meals, so you control what goes into it.

    Do it the old fashioned way. Well, I’m not talking about cave-people customs, but a lot of our “modern convenience” takes a lot out of our pockets and bodies. Baby food, for example, can easily be made in a blender from lightly steamed organic veggies. Learn basic sewing. Even if you don’t make clothes for your kids, it’s much more efficient to patch some pants that have experienced the terror of a two year old than to buy a new pair every week.
    Polygamy: it might not be for you, but what right do you have to keep it from me?

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    I more or less agree apart from the bit about homoeopathy. If you get a brain tumour or even a kidney stone then you're going to be in agony, and no amount of Homoeopathy is going to help you.

    If you are living in a country without free healthcare such as the U.S, then you really need to get private health insurance, and make sure it's the type of policy that will actually pay-out when you need it to. Homoeopathy is for the healthy not the sick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Horned God View Post
    I more or less agree apart from the bit about homoeopathy. If you get a brain tumour or even a kidney stone then you're going to be in agony, and no amount of Homoeopathy is going to help you.

    If you are living in a country without free healthcare such as the U.S, then you really need to get private health insurance, and make sure it's the type of policy that will actually pay-out when you need it to. Homoeopathy is for the healthy not the sick.
    Well, I did specify that one should use discretion. Obviously kidney stones are the kind of thing I wouldn't recommend a novice trying to cure on their own.

    However, a lot of people with children are without insurance, but they can easily obtain Homeopathic knowledge to help with small and common ailments that children have.
    Polygamy: it might not be for you, but what right do you have to keep it from me?

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    You forgot to mention hand-me-downs. I spent some of my childhood wearing my brother's old t-shirts, etc., playing with his Ninja Turtles, reading his books.

    In regards to saving change, I once read a statistic about Americans -- the average amount of change they have per wek is around 9.35$.

    Also about cloth diapers, my parents used them with my brother but not me (wonder why ). My father said it was really disgusting when I asked about it... I think a better solution would be compostable diapers. They must be good enough to use with a child, but degradeable enough that one can put it on the compost heap and use it in the garden later.
    People turn to poison as quick as lager turns to piss

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    Senior Member Matamoros's Avatar
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    I think when it comes to healthcare, it's best to learn to distinguish between a minor complaint, and a serious one which requires medical attention. Then again, I'm sure that if I was a parent I would be worried enough about my children to take them to the doctor when I thought there was a chance something was wrong.

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    How Expensive is It to Raise Children?

    I've been thinking about the common idea around here that we all should have as many children as possible, but I always wonder about financial concerns. So my question is, how expensive is it to support a child from newborn to adulthood?

    Another aspect that comes into play is differing ideas on how much financial support a parent has a duty to lend their child. Personally, I could not tolerate myself if I didn't pay for all of my children's higher education. If I end up having 4 or 5 children, that's going to be quite the task. I refuse to leave any of my future children 'high and dry' when they turn 18.

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    Senior Member Hilderinc's Avatar
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    Before you think that it is woefully and unattainably expensive, remember that there are homeless, unemployed, blacks who have 10+ kids and are able to raise them. ("raise" is the wrong word)

    You would be surprised how little things like coupons can add up. Growing a garden will also cut down on your food costs tremendously.

    What do those families with 20 kids that have their own TV show say?

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    Senior Member SaxonCeorl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorseWarrior View Post
    Before you think that it is woefully and unattainably expensive, remember that there are homeless, unemployed, blacks who have 10+ kids and are able to raise them. ("raise" is the wrong word)

    You would be surprised how little things like coupons can add up. Growing a garden will also cut down on your food costs tremendously.

    What do those families with 20 kids that have their own TV show say?
    I dunno, what do they say?

    I was hoping maybe some Skadi members who are raising (or raised) children could list certain things they needed to pay for, just to get an idea of what it costs. Things like food, clothing, medical care, schooling, toys, etc. I'd love to have many children if I think I can afford them, but I just want to get an idea of what it costs.

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    Senior Member Magni's Avatar
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    This is something I am interested in also. I would like to have lots of children but the cost is a major concern to me at this point.

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    Easy answer.... Very
    Tasmanian twice the heads!!.......twice the intelligence!?

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