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Thread: Low Testosterone, Or 'Male Menopause,' No Longer Just For Older Men

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    Low Testosterone, Or 'Male Menopause,' No Longer Just For Older Men

    In my practice, I've noticed that an increasing number of younger guys are complaining of sexual concerns, such as diminished libido and erectile problems, more commonly seen in older men.

    Some clinicians believe that factors like obesity, stress and inadequate sleep probably play a role in such issues. This isn't purely a lifestyle issue; these factors are also possible causes of low levels of the hormone testosterone, which can influence sexual function.

    "Low T" is still most common in older men. Known as male menopause or andropause, this gradual decrease in testosterone typically occurs steadily over time. In fact, "after age 40, men experience a 3% reduction in testosterone every year," naturopathic doctor Geovanni Espinosa said. "After age 60, about 20% of men experience andropause."

    According to some estimates, the average 80-year-old man will have about 50% less testosterone than he did as a young guy. As a result, men may experience problems such as insomnia, weight gain, decreased muscle and bone density, anger and depression, as well as decreased libido and other sexual problems.

    That said, low testosterone isn't necessarily just a consequence of aging. A number of factors can have an impact on a man's testosterone levels, as Espinosa writes as one of the contributors to the new book "Integrative Sexual Health," edited by Dr. Andrew Weil. The book notes that many factors influence sexual health, including mood, energy level, nutrition, genetics, age, health conditions and medications.

    One option for low testosterone is prescription testosterone-replacement therapy, but this approach can have worrisome side effects, such as decreased sperm production and shrinkage of the testicles. "Testosterone, like all hormones, has multiple actions on many body functions and on the mind," Weil said. "In my opinion, it should be taken -- and prescribed -- only to correct a deficiency documented by appropriate blood tests."

    Otherwise, Weil recommends "an integrative approach to sexual health" that assesses all the many factors that affect testosterone.
    More: https://edition.cnn.com/2018/09/19/h...ner/index.html

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    Sound methods Chlodovech's Avatar
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    It's not all bad though. Asian and European men have lower testosterone levels than Africans and Middle-Easterners anyway, it leads to the adoption of different reproductive strategies. Whereas African and Arab men go for quantity and try to father as many children as they can, European and Asian men invest more in fewer children. High testosterone levels also increases criminal and undesirable behaviour.
    “Remember that all worlds draw to an end and that noble death is a treasure which no-one is too poor to buy.” - C. S. Lewis, The Last Battle

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    I've repeatedly said in threads such as the 'INCEL' one (..before I got banned ) that falling testosterone levels are the elephant in the room.

    Even that statement you've just made, Chlod, is a very 'beta'-sounding one about Africans having higher levels than us. No wonder there's so much Internet porn out there featuring White men being 'cucked' by black ones when folks read stuff like that - even on here!

    The number of children produced has nowt to do with testosterone BTW and owes far more to factors such as contraception and abortion etc.. Catholic communities in Europe tend to produce more children than the other native ones but their testosterone levels are the same as the rest of the population.

    Fact is, however you analyse all of this, testosterone numbers in the West have been in free-fall for some time now and this has a lot of implications. Forget the comparisons with outside groups, we need to address why there's been a 20% decline over the past couple of decades.

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    Here's a good article. A lot of it makes sense ...

    You're Not The Man Your Father Was

    According to a recent report from JAMA, testosterone therapy among American men is on the rise. From 2010 to 2013, prescriptions more than doubled, which researchers partially attribute to ubiquitous drug marketing campaigns urging older men to boost “low T” levels. The swell of interest reflects a genuine physiological shift: Across the population, men today have less testosterone compared to men of the same age a generation ago. Asking why requires untangling a complex web of social, environmental, and behavioral factors that are dismantling age-old ideas about masculinity and triggering real anxiety over changing gender roles.

    Studies show that men’s testosterone levels have been declining for decades. The most prominent, a 2007 study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, revealed a “substantial” drop in U.S. men’s testosterone levels since the 1980s, with average levels declining by about 1% per year. This means, for example, that a 60-year-old man in 2004 had testosterone levels 17% lower than those of a 60-year-old in 1987. Another study of Danish men produced similar findings, with double-digit declines among men born in the 1960s compared to those born in the 1920s.

    The challenges to men’s health don’t end there. Rates of certain reproductive disorders (like testicular cancer) have risen over time, while multiple European studies have found that sperm counts are sinking. These trends coincide with a decline in musculoskeletal strength among young men: In a 2016 study, the average 20- to 34-year-old man could apply 98 pounds of force with a right-handed grip, down from 117 pounds by a man of the same age in 1985. Though grip strength isn’t necessarily a proxy for overall fitness, it’s a strong predictor of future mortality.

    What’s behind all the downward trends? The answer is complicated. The decline in testosterone levels is almost certainly linked to higher rates of obesity (which suppresses testosterone) and may be linked to lower rates of smoking in men (since nicotine is a potent aromatase inhibitor). In the 2007 study, however, the age-matched declines persisted after controlling for these variables. Many observers put more weight on increased exposure to environmental toxins, such as pesticides, parabens, and chemicals common in household products like phthalates and bisphenol A.

    Also playing a role are long-term shifts in the ways we work and live. Young men are far less likely to hold jobs in manual labor, so they don’t have to be as physically strong as previous generations. Meanwhile, certain forms of close relationships—such as marriage, fatherhood, and increased time spent with children—are causally linked to lower testosterone levels. Yet here again the evidence is muddled: On the one hand, Gen-X and Millennial men are marrying later and having fewer kids. On the other hand, young men today are more likely to live with other people—which may promote prosocial hormones like oxytocin that are natural antagonists to testosterone. And those who are fathers are spending more time with their children.

    One reason why it’s so hard to pinpoint what’s driving the declines is the sheer number of factors that could be in play. To account for low testosterone, researchers have cited other lifestyle trends** as wide-ranging as increased temperatures in homes and offices, lack of exercise, and even tight underwear. It’s also difficult to establish the direction of causality. Has testosterone declined in response to a changed world, or has the world changed to accommodate less virile men? Or is it both? Take declines in strength, for example: While we know supplementing with extra testosterone by itself increases muscle mass, we also know that strenuous exercise by itself promotes natural testosterone production.

    What’s happening to men physically dovetails with a broader story of social transformation. The economy is shifting away from jobs that favor men, like manufacturing, and toward sectors dominated by women. Young men have fallen behind women in educational attainment. They’re increasingly dropping out of the workforce and expressing less work centrality. The anxiety over the state of men mirrors a bigger debate over America’s national identity. Americans have traditionally seen themselves as a “pro-testosterone” nation: restless, striving, and rowdy. Yet in his new book The Complacent Class, Tyler Cowen argues that America is losing the dynamism, mobility, and enterprise that made it special. This anxiety may have even led the old-fashioned, overtly macho President Trump to victory.

    The confusion over what masculinity means today is reflected in the conflicted feelings of males now coming of age. Most American Millennial men report feeling pressured to project a traditional image of manhood characterized by traits like toughness, self-reliance, and hypersexuality—but when asked if they wish to emulate these characteristics themselves, the majority don’t. A separate survey asked men to rate themselves on a scale of “completely masculine” to “completely feminine.” Only 30% of 18- to 29-year-olds chose “completely masculine.” That’s compared to 65% of men over 65.

    All these social and cultural changes have also left Millennial women in uncharted waters. More face a dating pool where partners of equal education and status are harder to come by, leaving them waiting for men catch up or deciding to go it alone. “They aren’t men,” one young woman told Philadelphia Magazine flatly. “They’re boys.” It’s a sign of a long-term generational reversal: When Boomer women were coming of age, they wanted kinder, gentler men in touch with their feelings. Now Millennial women yearn for guys who can “man up” and take care of business.

    Ultimately, it’s impossible to pigeonhole what’s happening to masculinity as wholly positive or negative. The strongest objections come from critics who believe men and women are naturally built for traditional roles—or from those who argue that toxic chemicals are wreaking havoc on men’s health. Those who believe traditional gender roles are dysfunctional, however, welcome moving past them. A less testosterone-laden world might be less aggressive and more emotionally expressive. If there’s one thing on which observers agree, it’s the need for solutions to support the men the 21st-century economy is leaving behind.


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    The lower the better IMO. European and Asian men are more 'normal' than the African and Arab men. Also throw in the Latino men too. They are oversexed neanderthal freaks. Never understood that kind of behavior. Sickening.

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