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Thread: 2019 Danish General Election

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    2019 Danish General Election

    General elections will be held in the Kingdom of Denmark on 5 June 2019. All 179 members of the Folketing will be elected, 175 in Denmark proper, two in the Faroe Islands and two in Greenland. The election will be held 10 days after European Parliament elections in Denmark.

    At the 2015 general election, a narrow majority was won by the Danish People's Party, Venstre, Liberal Alliance and the Conservative People's Party, colloquially known as the "blue bloc". They gained 90 seats in the Folketing versus 89 seats for the remaining parties, all belonging to the "Red bloc". Ten days later, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, the leader of Venstre, became Prime Minister, when Venstre formed a single-party government supported by the remaining parties in the "blue bloc". In November 2016, Rasmussen formed a new government, now a coalition with Liberal Alliance, and the Conservative People's Party.

    Of the 179 members of the Folketing, 175 are elected in Denmark proper, two in Faroe Islands and two in Greenland. In Denmark there are ten multi-member constituencies containing a total of 135 seats directly elected by proportional representation, with seats allocated using a modified version of the Sainte-Laguë method and Hare quota. An additional 40 seats are used to address any imbalance in the distribution of the constituency seats, and are distributed among all parties that cross the 2% election threshold, according to their national vote share.

    Voters can choose between casting a personal vote for a candidate, or voting for a political party. The votes given to political parties are distributed among the candidates for that party. This can either be done in proportion to their personal votes, or by giving them to candidates in a predetermined order. All parties except the Red-Green Alliance make use of the first option.

    According to the Danish Constitution, the 2019 election was required to be held no later than 17 June 2019, as the previous elections were held on 18 June 2015. The Prime Minister is able to call the election at any date, provided that date is no later than four years from the previous election, and this is often cited as a tactical advantage for the sitting government, which can call an early election when polls are favourable.

    For a new party to become eligible to participate in the election, they must be supported by a number of voters corresponding to 1/175 of all valid votes cast in the previous election. A new party registering to contest the 2019 elections required 20,109 voter declarations to participate.
    More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_D...neral_election

    Opinion polling for the 2019 Danish general election:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinio...neral_election

    The 2019 Danish general election: What you should know about the parties on the right

    With 13 – yes, 13 – parties vying for seats in the Danish parliament, it can be hard to maintain an overview of where the parties stand and where they fit within Denmark’s traditional ‘bloc’ style coalitions, if they even fit in at all.

    In an attempt to provide readers with an introduction to the all the parties in a format that isn’t too overwhelming, The Local has opted to break them into three groups: the current right-of-centre coalition and its support, the left-of-centre opposition parties, and the new and fringe parties attempting to find their way into Christiansborg when Danes take to the polls on June 5th.

    First up are the three centre-right ruling coalition partners – Venstre, the Conservatives and Liberal Alliance – and their vital right-wing supporters, the Danish People’s Party.

    Venstre (English name: The Liberals)
    Leader: Lars Løkke Rasmussen, Denmark’s prime minister
    Current representation in parliament: 34 mandates (19 percent of the vote)
    Expected result: 31 mandates (17.5 percent)*

    Danish political party names can be rather confusing. Ruling party Venstre, for example, directly translates as ‘Left’ but the party is actually to the right on the traditional left/right political scale. Then there’s its English name, which has quite different connotations depending on which side of the Atlantic you’re on. While Americans associated the word ‘liberal’ with left-wing progressive politics, in Denmark it is associated more with the ideals of individual freedom.

    With that out of the way, what do The Liberals stand for? The party is primarily banking on positioning Rasmussen, who has been the nation’s PM for nearly seven of the past ten years, as “a steady hand in an uncertain time.” Somewhat surprisingly, Rasmussen announced this week that the party will also be running on what he’s calling a “welfare boost” that would increase welfare spending by 69 billion kroner through 2025. This stands in sharp contrast to the party’s 2015 election mantra of freezing public spending and is being panned by critics as a last-ditch attempt to roll back welfare cuts of his own making.

    The Liberals’ Inger Støjberg has also been the public face of Denmark’s increasingly tough immigration stance, highlighted by a running tally on the Immigration Ministry website that proudly proclaims the government’s 114 changes in immigration policies. The Liberal’s immigration policies made plenty of international news during Ramussen’s current reign, particularly the much-discussed – but largely symbolic – ‘jewellery law’ and Støjberg’s penchant for celebrating making immigrants’ lives harder by eating cake. But with the emergence of two fringe and rabidly anti-immigration parties (more on them later), The Liberals look almost compassionate in comparison.

    Det Konservative Folkeparti (English name: The Conservative People’s Party)
    Leader: Søren Pape Poulsen, Denmark’s justice minister
    Current representation in parliament: 6 mandates (3 percent of the vote)
    Expected result: 9 mandates (5 percent)*

    Conservative leader Søren Pape Poulsen, shown speaking with the Red-Green Alliance's Pernille Skipper. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen / Ritzau Scanpix
    Conservative leader Søren Pape Poulsen, shown speaking with the Red-Green Alliance's Pernille Skipper. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen / Ritzau Scanpix

    The Conservatives are part of Denmark’s current three-party, right-of-centre coalition along with The Liberals and Liberal Alliance. Poulsen and company would like to position themselves as the nation’s ‘tough on crime’ party and supports tougher crime penalties and increasing the number of police officers on the streets. Cynics might be tempted to point out that if so many police resources weren’t committed to the Conservative-backed border control or repeated but fruitless raids on the cannabis market in Christiania, this wouldn’t be an issue. In all fairness though, Danish police have been saying for years now that officers are stretched so thin that they are unable to carry out basic police work.

    Economically, the party is in favour of lowering income and homeowners taxes, cutting the nation’s astronomical vehicle registration tax for gasoline and diesel cars and scrapping it entirely for hybrids and electrics. The party thinks of itself as the most environmentally-focused member of the right-of-centre bloc and has promised to initiate a ‘climate law’ (although not the citizen-backed one that failed to move through parliament) that includes a number of green initiatives like binding targets for CO2 emission reductions.

    Liberal Alliance
    Leader: Anders Samuelsen, Denmark’s foreign minister
    Current representation in parliament: 13 mandates (7.5 percent of the vote)
    Expected result: 6 mandates (3.6 percent)*

    Liberal Alliance leader Anders Samuelsen. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Scanpix
    Liberal Alliance leader Anders Samuelsen at a Foreign Ministry press conference. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Scanpix

    As things stand now, Denmark’s libertarian party risks losing half of its seats in parliament. LA’s claim to fame is being a pro-business party that would like to see Denmark’s large public sector shrink significantly. Enthusiastic proponents of the free market, LA also thinks Danish taxes are way too high. Party leader Samuelsen famously threatened to topple the government if he couldn’t push through a decrease on topskat, a 15 percent tax paid by those who earn over 459,200 kroner ($69,000, €61,700) per year on top of other income taxes. He never got his wish but he failed to follow through on his threats, a loss of credibility that may have caused the party’s backing to plummet. Taxes are still front and centre of the party’s priorities, as LA would like to see the vehicle registration tax and the inheritance tax scrapped along with topskat.

    Dansk Folkeparti (English name: Danish People’s Party)
    Leader: Kristian Thulesen Dahl
    Current representation in parliament: 37 mandates (21.1 percent of the vote)
    Expected result: 25 mandates (13.9 percent of the vote)*

    DF's Kristian Thulesen Dahl campaigning in the Copenhagen suburb of Taastrup. Photo: Nils Meilvang / Ritzau Scanpix
    DF's Kristian Thulesen Dahl campaigning in the Copenhagen suburb of Taastrup. Photo: Nils Meilvang / Ritzau Scanpix

    Since its inception in 1995, the Danish People’s Party’s trademark has been its staunch opposition to immigration. It’s hard to overstate just how well this has worked for DF, both in terms of shifting the Overton window towards a much harsher public discourse on immigration and Islam, and in pushing the nation towards much stricter immigration legislation.

    DF was the big winner in the 2015 election, nearly doubling its mandates and becoming Denmark's second largest party and the biggest one in the right-wing bloc -- even bigger than Venstre. Perhaps the party’s greatest accomplishment has been getting the nation’s established parties, including the traditionally left-wing Social Democrats, to march in lockstep with DF’s rhetoric and policymaking. A prime example of this is the ‘paradigm shift’ passed earlier this year, in which Denmark’s refugee and asylum policy will now focus on sending refugees to their home countries rather than integrating them into Danish society.

    Ironically, DF’s very success may have set it up for a fall. Not only did the party face charges of running from responsibility by declining to join a coalition government, its nearly 25-year campaign against immigration created an opportunity for parties like The New Right (Nye Borgerlige) and Stram Kurs to try to one-up the party. The Danish People’s Party must now fight off parties invading its turf from both the right and left.

    * Expected results are based on a May 7 opinion poll by Epinion. With the poll taken nearly a full month before election day, these results are likely to change.
    https://www.thelocal.dk/20190510/the...-one-the-right

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    Denmark has voted and the left wing has won the election. Or has it? Here’s what happens next

    Source: Thelocal.dk



    The four left wing and left-of-centre parties in the ‘red bloc’ of Denmark’s parliament won an overall majority in last night’s election. These are the next steps towards a new government being formed.

    Outgoing Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, who conceded defeat in the election late last night, will visit Queen Margrethe at around 11am, this morning, where he will formally tender his government’s resignation.

    This afternoon, Her Majesty will engage in the so-called ‘Queen’s Round’ (‘Dronningerunde’), where she will meet with representatives from each of the parliamentary parties, who will advise her of their recommendations – including who they are nominating as prime minister.

    With an overall majority backing Social Democrat leader Mette Frederiksen (the Social Liberals, Socialist People’s Party and Red Green Alliance, as well as Frederiksen’s own party), she is likely to be given the nod.

    Rasmussen said last night that his party would recommend he continues as PM at the head of a coalition with traditional rivals on the left of centre, but the left wing's majority will probably (but not certainly) render this possibility a non-starter.

    However, the left parties – particularly the Social Liberals – will want policy concessions, so negotiations over how the government will be formed could take some time.

    The Queen will likely give Frederiksen a mandate to either form a government immediately or to try to form a government through negotiations, said Rune Stubager, professor of political science at Aarhus University.

    “I think the Social Liberals will phrase their advice so that, depending on the outcome of (coming) negotiations, they might support her, something to that effect,” Stubager said at a press briefing on Thursday morning.

    “They want to use this opportunity to put as much pressure as possible on the Social Democrats,” he added.

    The Social Liberals, a traditional coalition partner of the Social Democrats until Frederiksen last year announced her preference for a purely Social Democrat minority government, will be buoyed by their own strong election performance and will look to push for concessions on immigration and economic policy.

    That means that, although Frederiksen is highly likely to get the nod to try to form government – leaving Rasmussen’s overtures for a cross-aisle coalition on the scrapheap – there’s still some way to go before we know how the new government is going to look.
    "If we were going to stand in darkness, best we stand in a darkness we had made ourselves.” ― Douglas Coupland, Shampoo Planet

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    Too bad Stram Kurs didn't make it into the parliament. They got 1.9%, and needed 2% to get one mandate. Wouldn't have made much of a difference, in the grand scheme of things, but it would have made for an entertaining four years.
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    Denmark's Elections June 2019



    • A significant development in this election was that anti-immigration parties generally fared poorly.




    • "Many citizens wrongly think that the immigration issue is under control and that it can therefore safely be left to the Left. It is not under control... [B]y the year 2050, we will see a doubling of the Muslim population in Denmark... that would not be a problem if we had a solution for how to integrate them, but nowhere in Western Europe has a solution been found". — Kasper Støvring, author and commentator, Debatten-DR, June 6, 2019.




    • Another new development was that for the first time, according to a report in Jyllands Posten, Muslim voters were organized, in certain urban areas.... [A]n electoral group was set up, which, in co-operation with a mosque and various other associations, recommended that people vote for the two parties: the center-left Det Radikale Venstre and the far left Enhedslisten... Both parties have a pro-immigration stance. Det Radikale Venstre, for instance, wants to make it easier for refugees to gain permanent residence in Denmark.




    • Immigration policy will be one of the main challenges for the Social Democratic Party, as it attempts to form a government with the seats of Det Radikale Venstre and Enhedslisten, in addition to the Socialist People's Party.... the Social Democrats [wanted] the bulk of their policy focusing on how to reduce and control the influx of refugees and migrants, including the use of reception centers outside of Europe. In addition, their policy included making all stays for refugees in Denmark temporary, and extending border controls and reforming the Schengen cooperation so that individual countries decide when and how long they can control their own borders. Their policy also backs sending rejected asylum seekers home and tightening the laws in order to stop illegal migrants from working in Denmark.



    In Denmark's general election on June 5, the Danes gave the center-left and far left parties on the political spectrum 91 seats in parliament, a majority out of the 179 available seats. Pictured: Christiansborg Castle, seat of Denmark's parliament.




    In Denmark's general election on June 5, the Danes gave the center-left and far left parties on the political spectrum -- the Social Democratic Party, Det Radikale Venstre (the Danish Social Liberal Party), Socialistisk Folkeparti (the Socialist People's Party), and Enhedslisten (the Red-Green Alliance) -- 91 seats in parliament, a majority out of the 179 available seats. In doing so, the Danes waved goodbye to the current liberal-conservative government. The largest party on the left, the Social Democratic Party with 48 seats, and led by Mette Frederiksen, is currently trying to form a government.


    A significant development in this election was that anti-immigration parties generally fared poorly. Dansk Folkeparti, (the Danish People's Party), which had become the second-largest party in the 2015 elections, when it was the only party running on a strict anti-immigration platform and where it received 21% of the votes and 37 seats, was reduced to less than half, receiving only 8.7% of the votes and 16 seats. The new anti-Islamic, anti-immigration party, Stram Kurs, which campaigned on a platform of prohibiting Islam and deporting Muslims from Denmark, did not manage to cross the election threshold of 2%. It received only 1.8 % of the votes. Led by Rasmus Paludan, -- the party only managed to qualify to run in the elections a month before they took place. Finally, a new party on the right, Nye Borgerlige (the New Right) won four seats, with 2.4 % of the vote. The party ran on a platform that demanded that no more asylum seekers be allowed into the country, that foreigners must support themselves financially and that foreign criminals be deported after their first sentencing in court. The current Prime Minister, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, said he would not cooperate politically with either Rasmus Paludan or the New Right should they be elected to parliament.


    Some Danish analysts, such as the author and commentator Kasper Støvring, estimated that Danes did not vote for the anti-immigration parties this time because, "Many citizens wrongly think that the immigration issue is under control and that it can therefore safely be left to the Left. It is not under control".


    "Five years in a row," he added, "The crime rates have gone up among non-Western descendants; we have areas where the rule of law has de facto been suspended; we saw in the election campaign, that there are areas where you cannot gather and speak freely; when you go for a walk you nearly stumble on the concrete blocks [meant to protect terrorist targets] that remind us of the intrusive terror threat. These are very serious problems that do not go away... they will keep popping back because they have not been resolved... and by the year 2050 we will see a doubling of the Muslim population in Denmark... that would not be a problem if we had a solution for how to integrate them, but nowhere in Western Europe has a solution been found".


    Another new development was that for the first time, according to a report in Jyllands Posten, Muslim voters were organized, in certain urban areas listed by the government as ghettos. In Gellerup, in western Aarhus, an electoral group was set up, which, in co-operation with a mosque and various other associations, recommended that people vote for the two parties: the center-left Det Radikale Venstre and the far left Enhedslisten. As a result, in Gellerup, Det Radikale Venstre went from receiving 5.1% of the vote in 2015, to 34.2% in 2019. The same trend could be seen in other ghetto-areas, such as Vollsmose, Tingbjerg and in Nørrebro, where Enhedslisten was also popular. Both parties have a pro-immigration stance. Det Radikale Venstre, for instance, wants to make it easier for refugees to gain permanent residence in Denmark. The parties gained 8.6% and 6.9% of the votes respectively, corresponding to 16 and 13 seats.


    Immigration policy will be one of the main challenges for the Social Democratic Party, as it attempts to form a government with the seats of Det Radikale Venstre and Enhedslisten, in addition to the Socialist People's Party. In their election campaign, the Social Democrats made it clear that they wanted what they call a 'fair and realistic' immigration policy, with the bulk of their policy focusing on how to reduce and control the influx of refugees and migrants, including the use of reception centers outside of Europe. In addition, their policy included making all stays for refugees in Denmark temporary, and extending border controls and reforming the Schengen cooperation so that individual countries decide when and how long they can control their own borders. Their policy also backs sending rejected asylum seekers home and tightening the laws in order to stop illegal migrants from working in Denmark. Earlier this year, the Social Democrats voted for the liberal-conservative government's stricter immigration policies.


    That stance might make it difficult for the Social Democrats to form a government with Det Radikale Venstre, which has said that it wants to ease Denmark's current policies on immigration. Instead of focusing on sending migrants and refugees home, Det Radikale Venstre wishes to focus on better integration. Before the elections, the leader of the Social Democrats, Mette Frederiksen, said that if she won, "The tight immigration policy, which is set by a broad majority in the Folketing [the Danish parliament], is fixed... there will be no easing of the immigration policy and there is no party or party that can make an ultimatum on this".


    It now remains to be seen whether Frederiksen will be able to keep her word and still form a government.



    GATESTONE INSTITUTE Denmark's Elections16 Jun 2019.

    Today Liberal cultural marxism dominates the society and thinking of Europeans preventing them recognizing or dealing with mass alien invasion.

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    Overall disappointing. It's very difficult for me to understand how people can continue to vote for leftist bloc politics, despite the problems in this country. It's not that difficult to put 2 + 2. Anyway, an overview of how the candidates did:

    Socialdemokratiet: The country’s most popular party might have only won one extra mandate, but thanks to the support of Radikale, SF and Enhedslisten, the left bloc has more than enough mandates to form the next government with Socialdemokratiet leader Mette Frederiksen at the helm. Just 41 years old, she will become Denmark’s youngest-ever prime minister.

    Konservative: After a number of lean elections that scarcely merited their right to co-govern, the Danish Tories are back with six extra mandates. Søren Pape Poulsen, the outgoing justice minister, lapped up the applause last night in front of a crowd at Dansk Erhverv who looked like they have really started to believe again. Maybe this is only the beginning.

    SF: With seven extra mandates, SF has banished the poor performance of 2015 into the annals of history, and party leader Pia Olsen Dyhr – a newbie who looked out of place four years ago – can rightly be proud of her party’s performance, as it took its total number of seats from seven to 14. Should Socialdemokratiet choose to form a government with just one party, it will be SF. The likelihood of both SF and Radikale playing a part is slim.

    Radikale: After a poor show in 2015, party leader Morten Østergaard has instilled belief into the party’s ranks with a great election in which the party increased its number of mandates from eight to 16. The next four years will most likely see Radikale become the true flag-bearer of the left, as Socialdemokratiet becomes increasingly centrist. Unlikely, therefore, to play a part in the government, it will be expected to support S – and on issues such as immigration be in place, alongside Enhedslisten, to soften S’s stance.

    Nye Borgerlige: The new right-wing party started with nothing and thanks to an impressive election in which it won 2.4 percent of the public vote – ahead of Liberal Alliance, it now has four mandates, Its leader Pernille Vermund is particularly happy, as she competed valiantly against DF chair Kristian Thulesen Dahl in South Jutland, where DF’s share of the vote was more than halved from 28.4 to 12.5 percent. Mette Thiesen, Lars Boje Mathiesen and Peter Seier Christensen (the brother of Saxo Bank’s Lars) look most likely to fill the other mandates.

    Enhedslisten: At Vega in Vesterbro last night Pernille Skipper thanked a mostly 20-something crowd for making this a memorable election for the ultra left-wing party in the capital, where it very nearly won the biggest share of the vote. In ‘vegan-bro’, it romped home, and with 16.4 percent of the vote it was the second biggest party in the capital, but across the rest of the country its performance was so-so, and it ended up seeing its mandate share slide from 14 to 13.

    Kristendemokraterne: Nobody gave Kristendemokraterne a chance a few months ago, but the promotion of 26-year-old Isabella Arendt to the position of leader last month put fresh wind in their sails, and in the end the party came up only marginally short. Not only did they increase their 0.8 percent share of the votes in 2015 to 1.7 percent, but they were just 191 votes short of winning representation in west Jutland – a full explanation of exactly how would require an entire article! With Arendt at the helm, it won’t be long until they return to Parliament for the first time since 2001.

    Venstre: After a good performance in the European elections ten days earlier, Venstre was tipped to do well, but nobody was expecting its leader, PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen, to hang on to power (a miracle was needed) or for the leading blue party (overtaking DF this election) to be part of the next government. Venstre won nine extra mandates this election to take its total to 43 – just five shy of Socialdemokratiet – but in truth the damage was done a long time ago thanks to sloppy environmental policy (electric car subsidies, anyone?) and downright nasty immigration rules (the cake!). An eleventh-hour appeal to its main political rival to reach across the divide and form a government hardly did the other blue bloc parties any favours either.

    Dansk Folkeparti: Dansk Folkeparti was expected to do badly after a barnstorming 2015, but not this badly. It lost 21 mandates to leave it with just 16 – of which only one is in Copenhagen. This means that either Martin Henriksen, the immigration spokesperson, or group chair Peter Skaarup will lose their seat. The emergence of Nye Borgerlige and Stram Kurs took the wind out of its hard right-wing credentials, but in truth the damage was done a long time ago when DF failed to make any real impact despite being the biggest blue bloc party in 2015. Pia Kjærsgaard looks set to retain her seat – the only remaining DF mandate in the Københavns Omegn constituency.

    Liberal Alliance: The libertarian party lost over two-thirds of its mandates, as its allocation fell from 13 to four seats. The party lost both its mandates in the Nordsjællands Storkreds constituency, which means the party’s leader Anders Samuelsen will no longer be an MP. Likewise Joachim B Olsen, who memorably took an ad out on Pornhub, has also seen his load lightened.

    Alternativet: Despite its strong climate focus, the liberal party was never expected to match its performance in 2015 when it ran as the new boys with a keen focus on green concerns and culture. It has lost four of its nine mandates. A slide in popularity in the capital has seen the party lose one of its two mandates, meaning party leader Uffe Elbæk will hold onto his seat, but group chair Carolina Magdalene Maier will not.

    Stram Kurs: Heading into the election, the new far right party was grabbing all the headlines and seemingly on course to get more than 2 percent of the public vote – the minimum required to get a mandate (LA with 2.3 percent won four mandates) – but in the end it came up short, winning 1.8 percent. Did far-right voters ultimately decide that the more experienced Nye Borgerlige was a better bet? For Stram Kurs leader Rasmus Paludan, who only assembled his candidates in May, the election simply came too soon. But maybe he shouldn’t have made the naked artist guy one of his most prominent candidates.
    http://cphpost.dk/news/2019-danish-g...nd-losers.html

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