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Thread: Femcels and the problem of the pill

  1. #11
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    I'm pretty sure that if I showed pics of women on the pill the dudes who claim they're uglier wouldn't even be able to identify which is which.
    I'm 100% certain!!! The 'pill makes you ugly' theory is complete lunacy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gefjon View Post
    Anyways, the pill ain't the only way of contraception, there's also condoms and such, and not every chick takes it for that purpose. Other uses of the pill are:

    - to reduce menstrual cramps
    - to lighten or regulate periods
    - to balance hormonal issues (they contain estrogen & progesterone)
    - for endometriosis and menopause symptoms
    - to lower risk of ectopic pregnancy
    - to reduce or help prevent acne etc.
    That's very true. In fact many women take the pill to regulate their periods, like you mention, and not necessarily primarily for contraceptive reasons.

    By the way, there is no conclusive evidence that taking the pill causes women to gain weight.

    ...after several decades of research, there still isn’t any conclusive evidence that the effect is real. The largest review so far examined 49 studies of the combined pill and found “no large effect is evident”, but also that there wasn’t enough well-conducted research to be sure. The researchers found this is true no matter what type of progesterone the combined pill contained (for more on the different kinds of pill, check out this article). Other studies that looked at progesterone-only pills similarly have found little evidence of an effect.

    Maria Gallo, an endocrinologist at Ohio State University who co-authored the review, believes our belief in the pill-weight connection is down to a natural human bias. People are experts at finding patterns all around us, even where there are none. The phenomenon, known as apophenia, is the reason we may find it easy to compare peppers to politicians, see the faces of Harry Potter villains staring down at us from the clouds, or read too much into past lottery numbers. We’re particularly susceptible to apophenia if we’ve been primed to expect a certain outcome – such as gaining weight after starting a new medication.

    In the case of the pill, Gallo points out that the average person puts on just over a pound (half a kilo) of weight each year for most of their life, starting in early adulthood – which, incidentally, is when most women start using contraception. It may be reassuring to be able to blame this ‘weight creep’ on something other than overeating; last year she even caught women in the act of inventing weight gain after being fitted with the contraceptive implant.
    What some women experience is bloating due to water retention, which can be confused with weight gain.

    Another find was that women on a certain type of pill had gained 40% less muscle than those who weren’t on it:

    Even more intriguingly, the poor muscle gains weren’t found in all women on the pill, just those that contained a certain type of lab-made progesterone that likes to bind to the same protein.

    “We’re pretty confident the progesterone is what’s causing this,” says Riechman. One possibility is that by competing for the same binding sites, the hormone may be blocking signals to grow more muscle. The results haven’t definitively proven the link, but if it does turn out to be real, surely women will want to know about it – especially in the light of recent fitness obsessions such as CrossFit and Instagramming your abs. “This study should absolutely be followed up. People are interested and we get calls fairly regularly about it,” he says.
    Another possible effect is the way it exerts subtle influences where the fat it is stored in the body.

    At puberty, oestrogen and progesterone are responsible for the development of typically ‘female’ characteristics, such as wider hips and larger breasts, largely by changing the way fat is distributed. The hormones are also often given to transsexuals for the same reason.

    It’s easy to see how, theoretically, changing a woman’s hormone balance could alter where her fat is stored. Some research has borne this out: one early study found that women on pills with higher levels of oestrogen tended to have pear-shaped bodies and more subcutaneous fat, though not necessarily more fat overall.
    I'm pretty sure that if I showed pics of women on the pill the dudes who claim they're uglier wouldn't even be able to identify which is which.
    On the contrary, being on the pill can make some women appear more "womanly", which some men might find attractive. The pill after all contains female hormones, which contribute to the above-mentioned pear-shape type of body, as well as in some cases enlarged breasts.

    They found that not only did pill users have significantly larger breasts overall, but they were especially large at certain times of the month. Women who had previously been on the pill had an average-sized bust. The team didn’t check the women’s chest measurements before they started taking the pill, so it could be argued that these women had always had larger breasts. However, it seems likely this was due to the contraceptive pill, because their breast sizes weren’t linked to the normal factors you’d expect – such as their height, BMI, or body weight – as in the women who weren’t on the pill. Exactly how this happens remains a mystery. The breast expansion could just be swelling from fluid retention, but another possibility is that the hormones in the pill are actually causing women’s breasts to grow. For example, the burst of growth that happens each month, and is necessary to maintain a constant size, could be lasting a bit longer.
    Source

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gefjon View Post
    Not to mention women who are athletes
    Yes, I remember talking with a (supposedly good) gynecologist once, and he told me he had athletes as patients, who needed to suspend their menstruation using the pill for months, in order to be in shape for the competitions. He wanted to recommend me the same pill as he was recommending his athlete patients... I decided to think more about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gefjon View Post
    have hormonal conditions like PCOS, take certain meds & so on. Anyways, the pill ain't the only way of contraception, there's also condoms and such, and not every chick takes it for that purpose. Other uses of the pill are:

    - to reduce menstrual cramps
    - to lighten or regulate periods
    - to balance hormonal issues (they contain estrogen & progesterone)
    - for endometriosis and menopause symptoms
    - to lower risk of ectopic pregnancy
    - to reduce or help prevent acne etc.
    I was prescribed to take contraceptive pills due to PCOS, while I was still a teenager, and they had horrible effects on me. I guess I had almost all the adverse effects written on the leaflet coming with the pills, plus some others not mentioned there.

    Just a random example, here is a leaflet describing the effects of such contraceptive pills: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/files/pil.6900.pdf It seems they have more side effects now than the last time I checked anything like that, when I took pills myself following a doctor's advice, more than 10 years ago... Cancer was not included as a side effect back then, but now it is...

    After three weeks of feeling horrible and bleeding almost all the time, in the 7 days of taking false pills I started to feel better, and when starting to take hormonal pills again I started to feel horrible again and having all those side effects. I went to my family doctor and I told her I'm going to stop taking that s**t and she warned me that it would do me more harm if I stop to take them... But, thanks God, I stopped taking the pills after just a few days in the second month of taking them, the most horrible side effects stopped... and after that I also started looking for natural solutions to my hormonal imbalances. She warned me that I will continue bleeding if I stop taking pills (I was bleeding all the time anyway because of the pills), so I looked myself for plants that would help me stop the bleeding and it really worked. Unfortunately now people have less access to information about natural remedies, because 'they' want to ban them and make everyone take poisonous pills of all the kinds instead (and making Big Pharma even richer). Back then I was able to find the information myself, now it's not that easy anymore, despite the internet access, they are not allowed, by law, to include all these healing effects in the leaflets for medicinal plants for teas, for example.

    How I stopped the bleeding caused by the pills? Probably using either this plant: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsella_bursa-pastoris or this plant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equisetum_arvense, or maybe both (I don't remember now exactly which one I used, probably both, but for sure I was using a diluted tincture of that or of each plant). Now it's hard to find such information about their ability to stop haemorrhages, unfortunately, but back then it was not that difficult, they were allowed to write such information in the leaflets of the tinctures, for example.

    And guess what? It took me more or less than one year just to get rid of all the visible side effects I got from the f*****g pills (bleeding was just one of them)! Who knows what other effects the pills had which were not so evident. I got rid of those by using just plants and natural medications (natural supplements) only... And, thanks God again, I also found natural remedies for all types of feminine hormonal imbalances too...

    So contraceptive pills are not such a good solution for hormonal imbalances, there are much better solutions out there, directly from Mother Nature, 100% natural, without any side effects. Just read all that's written in a leaflet that comes with any pills and you'll be horrified yourself, regardless of gender!

    And I don't think any other hormonal contraceptive methods are much better than that. Anything synthetic which interferes with our hormones, and with our bodies in general, is just poison, to one degree or another. But taking such poison internally is the worst of them all, in my humble opinion!

    The second gynecologist I've been to, the one who had athlete patients, told me that the first gynecologist prescribed me the wrong pills and he wouldn't prescribe me that. He said he didn't know of any natural ways to cure PCOS, but he didn't force me to take whatever he would recommend me. He told me what his best solution was, to take that pill that would suspend my menstrual cycle for a couple of months (like for athletes), and he let me think about it. A friend recommended him as a good doctor, and I think he was, my friend had an extra-uterine pregnancy while on pills about which she found out too late, and the only doctor she trusted to do the surgery on her was him. She had one ovary extracted unfortunately and she was unsure about being able to ever have babies again, but well, after many years she did it, and she has a son now... This is another story, related to the unfortunate possible effects of the pills.

    All in all, looking back now, it's not that bad that I got the wrong (really?) recommendation first, it made me become a fierce anti-pill militant, telling anyone I know not to take pills and explain them why. But it was at the cost of my health to some degree, unfortunately. So I am strongly against taking pills or using any other hormonal methods, either for contraception or just for 'treating' hormonal imbalances.

    If someone is an athlete or such, and they choose to take pills... it's their decision. But I can tell there are much better ways than that which are 100% natural and have no side effects. But like all natural ways it takes more time and patience... If some people prefer to take pills and have instant effects, then it's their choice... I try not to judge people for that, but I'm defending my stance on this issue.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gefjon View Post
    Anyways, there's no need for sexual abstinence. We ain't in the 1900s. For married couples and those who want sex regularly there's other long-term contraceptive options, like the patch (lasts for 3 weeks), the shot (lasts for 3 months), contraceptive implants (reversible, up to 4 years), IUD (3-12 years), or, if you're sure you no longer want kids and/or you're past a certain age, permanent methods like surgical sterilization.
    I wouldn't recommend any of these which interfere with the hormones or with the normal natural condition of the human body. I'd rather recommend people to learn sexual continence (here's a thread I opened about this https://forums.skadi.net/threads/177...ual-Continence), even if it implies more effort, it is all natural and worth all the efforts!

    So no sex on pills or other hormonal contraception like that for me, I'd rather be abstinent if the man doesn't want to learn sexual continence (and use condoms if not perfect with sexual continence)!


    Quote Originally Posted by Gefjon View Post
    I'm pretty sure that if I showed pics of women on the pill the dudes who claim they're uglier wouldn't even be able to identify which is which.
    I have to agree with that too... It's hard to tell. Some dudes who claim to be Nordicists, for example, cannot even distinguish between fake blonde hair and natural blonde hair, or between contact lenses and natural blue or green eyes... I guess it's more difficult to tell if someone is on pill or not than telling if someone had dyed her hair or not or if she's wearing lenses or not...
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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