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Thread: Where Are the English-Americans?

  1. #11
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    People of primary English ancestry and mainly found in the Northeast corner of the country and some in the South. The Midwest, Texas, and California has a lot of people of German ancestry along with Scandinavians in the upper Midwest. As America was settled in the West things became more blurred with mixtures from primarily Northwestern Europe.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpearBrave View Post
    People of primary English ancestry and mainly found in the Northeast corner of the country and some in the South. The Midwest, Texas, and California has a lot of people of German ancestry along with Scandinavians in the upper Midwest. As America was settled in the West things became more blurred with mixtures from primarily Northwestern Europe.
    the midwest's germanness is overrated.
    the most common names there are almost all English.
    https://blogs.ancestry.com/cm/whats-...in-your-state/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Etain View Post
    the midwest's germanness is overrated.
    the most common names there are almost all English.
    https://blogs.ancestry.com/cm/whats-...in-your-state/
    I live in the Midwest, been researching German American history a long time.

    https://blogs.voanews.com/all-about-...s-melting-pot/

    please view the map associated with the blog
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpearBrave View Post
    I live in the Midwest, been researching German American history a long time.

    https://blogs.voanews.com/all-about-...s-melting-pot/

    please view the map associated with the blog
    The census map? I don't believe it at all. So many of the people claiming German first are probably majority British.

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    One might also ask, where are all the English in England? Being English is deeply unfashionable among the liberal elite, and virtue signallers will claim to be almost anything else, if they can get away with it. No doubt a similar situation pertains in the United States, perhaps exacerbated by historical circumstance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Etain View Post
    The census map? I don't believe it at all. So many of the people claiming German first are probably majority British.
    Um, actually the other way around, many people with German last names changed their names to a more English sounding version, Schmitt into Smith, Swartz into Black, Braun into Brown, and especially Muller into Miller. This happened a lot during WWI, as anti-German sentiments were very high during that time and again during and after WWII

    Here is a video explaining German immigration a little better



    The way you have to view is after the US was founded, English immigration went down to a trickle while immigration from German speaking countries surged. To put this in a modern context think of how hispanics are migrating into America at a alarming rate, the big difference is Germans assimilated into American society and culture which is basically European, while hispanics are not and will not assimilate.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpearBrave View Post
    Um, actually the other way around, many people with German last names changed their names to a more English sounding version, Schmitt into Smith, Swartz into Black, Braun into Brown, and especially Muller into Miller. This happened a lot during WWI, as anti-German sentiments were very high during that time and again during and after WWII

    Here is a video explaining German immigration a little better



    The way you have to view is after the US was founded, English immigration went down to a trickle while immigration from German speaking countries surged. To put this in a modern context think of how hispanics are migrating into America at a alarming rate, the big difference is Germans assimilated into American society and culture which is basically European, while hispanics are not and will not assimilate.
    The Anglicized names are a minority. That map is totally off, especially with PA and Ohio. I'm from PA Dutch country and still around 75% British.
    You can pick any random town in the midwest and there is a 90% chance it will have been settled by English

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    Quote Originally Posted by Etain View Post
    The Anglicized names are a minority. That map is totally off, especially with PA and Ohio. I'm from PA Dutch country and still around 75% British.
    You can pick any random town in the midwest and there is a 90% chance it will have been settled by English
    There is the problem with your statement, settled by English later taken over by Germans in the 1800s. The immigration numbers just do not add up for the majority of the Europeans in America to be English. The simple truth is more Germans immigrated here since America's founding census and statics prove this. I understand you folks of English ancestry want to claim the majority, but your numbers just don't add up. Please study American immigration patterns.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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    This is a map of Anglo-American surnames produced by a now defunct Southern Nationalist blog:

    Name:  AngloAmericans.png
Views: 54
Size:  100.6 KB

    Based off of surname data, the area with the most Anglo-Saxon ancestry is the South (very few Germans settled in the South so it is unlikely that many people down there are the descendants of assimilated Germans who had Anglicized their surnames).

    It's also worth pointing out that the Englishness of New England is often over exaggerated in pop culture. The northeast was the area where massive waves of French-Canadian, Irish, Italian, Polish, etc. immigrants settled and this means it is the most ethnically heterogenous region of the USA. All of this is backed up by genetic data:

    https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/...us-of-america/

    (Side note: the link's map doesn't appear to be working at the moment which means it might be defunct - the long story short is that Ancestry.com's genetic data implies Germans are the majority in the Midwest, British Americans dominate the South, the Northeast is a melting pot, and the West is a Northwest Euro mix).

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpearBrave View Post
    There is the problem with your statement, settled by English later taken over by Germans in the 1800s. The immigration numbers just do not add up for the majority of the Europeans in America to be English. The simple truth is more Germans immigrated here since America's founding census and statics prove this. I understand you folks of English ancestry want to claim the majority, but your numbers just don't add up. Please study American immigration patterns.
    The English settlers didn't just disappear. They intermarried with the Germans after a point. My great-grandparents were ethnic Germans from Romania and they intermarried with colonial mutts by the second generation.

    1980 was half a century after the last German immigrants came, and the English still were the most numerous. The only change is that the narrative of the US being a "nation of immigrants" started being pushed more aggressively by then.
    However, demographers regard this as a serious under count, as the index of inconsistency is high and many if not most Americans from English stock have a tendency to identify simply as "Americans"[6][7][8][9] or if of mixed European ancestry, identify with a more recent and differentiated ethnic group.[10] In the 1980 Census, over 49 million (49,598,035) Americans claimed English ancestry, at the time around 26.34% of the total population and largest reported group which, even today, would make them the largest ethnic group in the United States.[11]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Americans
    Quote Originally Posted by J.Yaxley View Post
    This is a map of Anglo-American surnames produced by a now defunct Southern Nationalist blog:
    Based off of surname data, the area with the most Anglo-Saxon ancestry is the South (very few Germans settled in the South so it is unlikely that many people down there are the descendants of assimilated Germans who had Anglicized their surnames).

    It's also worth pointing out that the Englishness of New England is often over exaggerated in pop culture. The northeast was the area where massive waves of French-Canadian, Irish, Italian, Polish, etc. immigrants settled and this means it is the most ethnically heterogenous region of the USA. All of this is backed up by genetic data:

    https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/...us-of-america/

    (Side note: the link's map doesn't appear to be working at the moment which means it might be defunct - the long story short is that Ancestry.com's genetic data implies Germans are the majority in the Midwest, British Americans dominate the South, the Northeast is a melting pot, and the West is a Northwest Euro mix).
    I've posted surname data before. English names dominate in the midwest as well. I don't buy that most of them anglicized their names. It wouldn't have that huge an effect in overall stats.

    I know for a fact that map is false. I live in PA and at least 75% of the people I've interacted with have had English names.

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