Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Champion Belgium pigeon sold at auction for a record-breaking €1.25m

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Last Online
    56 Minutes Ago @ 12:45 PM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Irish, Scottish
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Location
    North Ireland
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    National Socialist
    Religion
    Ethnic Catholic
    Posts
    1,374
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,524
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,645
    Thanked in
    890 Posts

    Champion Belgium pigeon sold at auction for a record-breaking €1.25m



    Armando

    A Belgian racing pigeon called Armando has sold at auction for €1.25m, more than three times the world record. Auction house Pigeon Paradise (Pipa) called Armando the "best Belgian long-distance pigeon of all time". "Nobody expected this. No one," Jorge Ferrari from the Piipa auction site told Reuters.
    Chinese enthusiasm for the long-distance racing of homing pigeons has driven prices up sharply, with birds from the traditional heartland of the sport in Belgium being particularly prized.



    However, until the furious bidding that lasted throughout Sunday evening, the record price stood at €376,000. Armando, a record-breaking long-distance racing champion owned by Joel Verschoot, was eventually sold to an anonymous buyer in China for €1,252m.



    In an indication of how the buyer may hope to recoup the investment, not only can race prize money in China reach seven figures but seven of Armando's offspring were also auctioned for an average price of €21,500 each; the five-year-old Flemish flier may have highly profitable breeding years ahead of him.



    The champ, who turns five this year, is now enjoying his retirement and has already fathered a number of chicks.





    Champion pigeon sold at auction for a record breaking €1.25m

    World record 18 Mar 2019.



  2. The Following User Says Thank You to jagdmesser For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Last Online
    56 Minutes Ago @ 12:45 PM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Irish, Scottish
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Location
    North Ireland
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    National Socialist
    Religion
    Ethnic Catholic
    Posts
    1,374
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,524
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,645
    Thanked in
    890 Posts

    Racing pigeons and birds of prey


    Predation by birds of prey accounts for only a small proportion of losses of racing pigeons.





    Some pigeon fanciers are concerned that the increase in the numbers of birds of prey, particularly peregrines and sparrowhawks, is posing a significant threat to their hobby.


    Peregrines and sparrowhawks will kill racing pigeons and can cause injury or disruption to flocks.


    However, three independent studies into the reasons why racing pigeons fail to return to lofts concluded that, while the proportion of pigeons lost to birds of prey can vary according to region, the numbers are small compared to other causes. An estimated 86 per cent of the pigeons lost each year fail to return for reasons other than predation by birds of prey.


    Pigeons fail to return to their lofts for a variety of reasons. A UK wide study by the Government's UK Raptor Working Group found:

    • Straying and exhaustion accounted for 36 % of losses.
    • Collisions with solid objects like buildings and windows – 19 % of losses.
    • Collisions with overhead wires – 15 % losses.
    • Predation by birds of prey – 14 % of losses.
    • Shooting, entanglement in netting, poisoning and oiling – 8 % of losses.
    • Predation by mammals, including domestic cats – 8 % of losses.

    An average loft in the UK houses 73 racing pigeons – the research indicates that a typical owner will lose 38 pigeons each year. Of these, just over five would be killed by sparrowhawks and peregrines while 14 will have strayed, gone feral or died of starvation and exhaustion, seven will have died in a collision, six will have hit overhead wires, three will have been shot, poisoned or oiled and three will have been eaten by a mammal.


    Straying accounts for the highest losses in racing pigeons and more needs to be done to understand the causes for this. Of those pigeons that were taken by birds of prey, a significant number of them had already strayed from their lofts and become feral before they were killed.


    As predation by birds of prey accounts for only a small proportion of losses of racing pigeons, killing them would have little impact on the numbers of pigeons lost overall but could threaten populations of peregrines and sparrowhawks.


    Conservation groups and the government are concerned because illegal killing of some birds of prey limits their population and distribution. In some parts of the UK, there is strong evidence that peregrines are routinely poisoned and their nests destroyed.


    The UK Raptor Working Group recommended that greater effort should go into seeking ways to reduce straying and to reduce the vulnerability of pigeons to predators. Significant benefits could be gained if pigeon fanciers considered some moderate changes to the timing of the racing season and the time they train their birds (to avoid the start of the peregrines' breeding season).


    Various deterrents are also available for use around lofts in order to reduce bird of prey predation. There have been few trials on the effect of these and their use should be investigated further with the results disseminated widely amongst the pigeon racing community. These approaches are likely to be much more effective at reducing racing pigeon losses than the killing of birds of prey.


    Racing Pigeons and Birds of Prey - The RSPB 19 mar 2019.





    • Predation by birds of prey – 14 % of losses.
    • Predation by mammals, including domestic cats – 8 % of losses.

    Its widely known that Pigeon Fanciers deliberately set poisoned bait for birds of prey and nothing is done about it.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to jagdmesser For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Omnia in bonum
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Alice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    English and German
    Subrace
    Nordid + CM
    mtDNA
    K1c2
    Gender
    Religion
    Catholic
    Posts
    1,835
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2,898
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,055
    Thanked in
    585 Posts
    I wasn't aware that the Chinese were so interested in pigeon racing, jagdmesser. I don't know much about the sport, other than its popularity in England, and I had no idea the sport originated in Belgium.

    Terrible to hear that pigeon fanciers poison birds of prey, by the way. How vile!
    Let us not desire delights, daughters; we are well-off here; the bad inn lasts for only a night.
    -St. Teresa of Avila

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Alice For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Sunday, October 23rd, 2016, 06:59 PM
  2. Is Climate Change Causing the Record-Breaking Tornadoes & Floods?
    By Hersir in forum Natural Sciences & Environment
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Tuesday, May 31st, 2011, 07:12 PM
  3. Classify Cyclo-cross Champion Sven Nys from Belgium
    By keltic_stijn in forum Anthropological Taxonomy
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Monday, January 31st, 2005, 05:20 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •