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Thread: Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Untouched primeval forest in Iceland? Where exactly?

    I agree they should let forests their way, and not interfere too much. There was a good video about such kind of forestry on the internet, but they put it down unfortunately... In the video a brave woman was saying they realized that they were doing forestry in a wrong way, that they didn't understand how Nature works, and they should change the approach in forestry. Very good video. No wonder it was closed down. Both the website with that, and both the video from youtube... I wanted to share it here...
    I was talking in general. We really don't have the notion of a primeval and untouched forest in Europe, excluding Białowieża.

    Sadly, we are used to watch plantations in Europe, when real forest should look like this one:



    Icelanders should use this opportunity to make a long-term reforestation program focusing only on native continental plants and leaving at least so small patches of untouched areas.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volk und Rasse View Post
    I was talking in general. We really don't have the notion of primeval and untouched forest in Europe, excluding Białowieża.
    Sadly, we are used to watch plantations instead of forest in Europe, when real forest should look like this one:
    There are still real forests in Northern Europe. But almost pure conifer forests ... opposite to video.

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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volk und Rasse View Post
    We really don't have the notion of a primeval and untouched forest in Europe, excluding Białowieża.
    You are wrong, my dear. Besides the forests already mentioned, there still are primeval forests in Romania:

    https://theecologist.org/2018/mar/07...imeval-forests
    http://schickhofer-photography.com/north/

    Romania is home to the biggest share of remaining virgin forests in Europe. But they are vanishing rapidly due to (illegal) logging. Even in National Parks such as Domogled or Semenic National Park ancient forests are being logged: Roads and clearcuts are digging deeper and deeper into the wilderness…

    Source
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    Semenic National Park, Romania: Ancient forest in the Nera Springs reserve, the largest virgin beech forest of the EU. (c) Matthias Schickhofer


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    Cosava Mica, Romania: Fascinating wilderness adjacent to Semenic National Park. Romania's state forestry Romsilva wants to cut down that forest. (c) Matthias Schickhofer


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    Cosava Mica Virgin Forest, Romania - October 2015: Endangered ancient forest in the southern Carpathians. (c) Matthias Schickhofer



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    Cosava Mica Virgin Forest, Romania: The 730 ha big virgin forest has been growing there since 6000 years. Now logging has started... (c) Matthias Schickhofer


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    Semenic National Park, Romania: Nera Springs virgin forest, the biggest in the EU. (c) Matthias Schickhofer


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    Semenic National Park, Romania: Decomposing mushrooms on dead wood in the ancient forest. (c) Matthias Schickhofer


    The problem is:



    "Most of the EU’s last primeval forests are still to be found in Romania. But they are under immediate threat from ongoing commercial logging, even in national parks and Natura 2000 areas, environmental NGOs EuroNatur and Agent Green claim.... The eradication of primeval forests in Romania is Europe's biggest and most pressing nature conservation drama today. But almost nobody is taking notice."



    That's heartbreaking, but this is how things are...

    Better with replanted forests than with no forests at all... So it's good they replant forests in Iceland... By the way, I have some forestry education, so I know what I'm talking about... Indeed Western Europe doesn't have any primeval forests left, they cut down everything at some point and then they replanted their forests...

    However...



    Also...



    I think it's more about political interests and propaganda why they say the forest in Poland is the last one remained... because it's not, but soon it will be, or soon it will be no primeval forests left if things continue like now...

    I'm surprised that as a biologist you didn't know about the primeval forests in Romania...

    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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    Do they have any non-fossilized samples of the trees that once grew in Iceland?

    My guess Birch, Cedar, and Spruce would have existed in that climate. Since Iceland is isolated, there might have been several subspecies that are now extinct. I don't know for sure, I would say Canada may be better to find a closer climate related species, think of natural wind and ocean currents these would have effected Iceland's trees.

    Here in Midwest North America they will re-forest with non-native species such as pine and then let the native beech, oak and maple trees take over slowly. This helps stop erosion and lets soil/humus build to give native species a better foothold.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpearBrave View Post
    Do they have any non-fossilized samples of the trees that once grew in Iceland?

    My guess Birch, Cedar, and Spruce would have existed in that climate. Since Iceland is isolated, there might have been several subspecies that are now extinct. I don't know for sure, I would say Canada may be better to find a closer climate related species, think of natural wind and ocean currents these would have effected Iceland's trees.
    I was thinking about the same thing... Maybe they don't have anything left for a sample, and that's why they plant non-native species... My guess is that they had something native (at least this is what I understood from the video), but they didn't have any success with replanting it and it all died... So they tried something else AFTER trying native species without any success...


    Quote Originally Posted by SpearBrave View Post
    Here in Midwest North America they will re-forest with non-native species such as pine and then let the native beech, oak and maple trees take over slowly. This helps stop erosion and lets soil/humus build to give native species a better foothold.
    That's the common thing to do in forestry... Of course native species are preferred, but if they can't make them grow there again (different soil conditions now also, among other things), then they do the best they can... Some tree species are very versatile and can adapt very easy to various conditions, which is a good start for re-forestation... And as you said, it takes some steps to re-forest...
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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