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Thread: Who Do You Consider to Be Your Own People or Folk?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    You mean assimilation of Swedes that Finns should be thankful for... ..

    The solution to this, I think, is to have your own traditional Swede communities in Finland, more like closed communities... and not mix too much with Finns.

    Do Swedes from Finland usually have a strong feeling of belonging to their own ethnic group, like you do, or not so much?
    First of all...we have that kind of place ... Ĺland island.





    They have very autonomous position. They (just like us) will study Finnish at school, but seriously .... one can not survive with Finnish there (Finnish tourists uses English if their Swedish is too bad). Ethnic Finns rights to move there and buy/own something is limited also pretty tightly. Opposite ... I think they would welcome me with open arms. Besides Ĺland islands doesn't belong to EU. Unfortunately I'm not able to carry our farm and lands there....
    Here in continental Finland? I think we have ''survived'' quite nicely but unavoidable awaits us.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    I am mentioning this since Finns and Magyars/ Hungarians are related to each other, being probably the only big non-European group of people we had in Europe for quite a long while...
    Honestly I'm not expert of Hungarian history either. I know there are different ideas about their origin? Some seems to prefer more idea that they are linked to Turks and not to Finns? Another matter ... Finnish and Hungarian languages have separated already 8000 years ago. For all today's Indo-Europeans languages? Those have formed/separated from each others much much later. Gives some idea/time scale.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    I don't think I would choose a Magyar/ Hungarian partner though, their culture is too much different, and also the historical issues we had over time... Also, when we have traditional pottery fairs in Romania, I avoid buying things from Magyars (even though they have nice traditional art too), I prefer to buy only from Daco-Romanians, to support their work instead!
    I will not choose Finn partner either. I want my kids can identify with Scandinavians ... fully.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    I also lost some Magyar friends because of some nationalist statements I made a couple of years ago... That's it, if they took it personal...
    I have never had real Finnish friends, but I know (and have known) some of them via my hobbies and studies.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Please... can you translate that saying for me? Or at least explain what it means...
    Very very freely ... something that you can never trust Russian/Russians.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Romania is part of NATO... very strategic placed on the map too... Russians don't like it, of course.
    We should have done it also then Sovjet Union collapsed ... unfortunately our president was ''a product of Cold war'' time (= a yellow chicken). No balls for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    That's normal. You don't live in Central Europe and that's not something they would include in school books... But this is where I think places like this forum are very useful, to exchange information and experiences, to learn more about the different situations in different parts of the Germanic world, and especially about the ethnic minorities in the diaspora... This is probably one of the last things they would include in mainstream education... I think it's important to discuss things like these and learn from each other's experiences (there's always something to learn in there).
    Very true ... for example Belgium & Switzerland ... I have learned a lot.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    First of all...we have that kind of place ... Ĺland island.





    They have very autonomous position.

    I think they would welcome me with open arms. Besides Ĺland islands doesn't belong to EU.
    Looks like Paradise and also sounds very good! Maybe you're lucky to find a nice Swede from those islands to be your husband... or maybe he finds you!


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Honestly I'm not expert of Hungarian history either. I know there are different ideas about their origin? Some seems to prefer more idea that they are linked to Turks and not to Finns? Another matter ... Finnish and Hungarian languages have separated already 8000 years ago.
    I don't speak any of those two languages, Finnish and Hungarian, but from what I heard they are still quite close related. I talked to Hungarians who were also learning, or already speaking, Finnish, and they all said that indeed those two languages are very much related even today, and it was quite easy for them to learn Finnish...

    I don't know if the other way around works as easy, I mean as a native speaker of Finnish to easily learn Hungarian. For Romanians is very easy to learn Italian, just as an example, but for Italians it's very difficult to learn Romanian...

    I never heard about Hungarians being related to Turks before... That's interesting!


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Very very freely ... something that you can never trust Russian/Russians.
    This reminded me of a joke we have in Moldova (Romania), about Russians...

    Two men, a Romanian and a Russian, were together hunting. They both shot the same animal and then, when it was time to divide the prey between them, the Russian asked the Romanian:
    - Would you like to divide it like brothers, or equally between us?
    The Romanian replied:
    - Let's divide it equally!
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Looks like Paradise and also sounds very good!
    Yes...it can look pretty nice there (space to breath). Lots of smaller islands too. Have stopped there couple of times while travelling to Sweden.




    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Maybe you're lucky to find a nice Swede from those islands to be your husband... or maybe he finds you!
    You mean a fisherman? I guess active holiday tourism is another professions there. Ok, they have Finland's biggest potato chips factory... so they need to have some farming too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    I don't speak any of those two languages, Finnish and Hungarian, but from what I heard they are still quite close related. I talked to Hungarians who were also learning, or already speaking, Finnish, and they all said that indeed those two languages are very much related even today, and it was quite easy for them to learn Finnish...
    I think they are still pretty distant, but compare any other European languages ... they are someway related. Pronouncing of alphabets might be pretty similar. Estonian is much much closer to Finnish.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    I never heard about Hungarians being related to Turks before... That's interesting!
    Ok, maybe I remembered totally wrongly. Besides who would really like to be related Turks? LOL.

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  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrd View Post
    I would consider someone to be Germanic if they are half Germanic by blood but mostly or fully identify with the Germanic side.
    I somewhat agree with this, the minimal amount of ancestry to be considered Germanic in my mind would be 50%, however I don't automatically consider everyone who is 50% Germanic by ancestry my people. Heritage, culture, experience, mentality are also relevant. A half German half Italian who was raised in Italy with Italian as mother language and Italian culture I wouldn't consider as a member of my nation. I don't think ethnic mixing is a good idea to begin with, especially with non-Germanics, I don't embrace it as it dilutes our blood and culture. Ethnically mixed people, especially those of half non-Germanic ancestry usually have identity issues and will have trouble being accepted fully by either group. I've known some people who had one foreign parent and while in some cases it surprised me to hear, in others it was pretty clear that they had more sympathies for their non-Germanic side (in discussions such as WWII, they defended the Russians against the Germans). Usually when people's non-Germanic ancestry is significant and within close memory (a non-Germanic parent or grandparent who has a significant influence in their life), it's pretty obvious, and those people talk about their non-Germanic culture all the time. For example, I used to have a colleague at work who was half Italian, all they ever talked about was Italian things... Italian food, Italian culture, how it's like in Italy, etc. I heard more about Italy from this supposedly "Germanic" person than I ever heard in my life put together. Hence why I don't automatically consider everyone who is half Germanic by ancestry to be my kin. If the non-Germanic side is significant, then that's what I consider them.

    And personally, I wouldn't like an ethnically mixed person for a partner. While I accept some ethnically mixed people as a "necessary evil" I don't condone it. In my mind those Germanics who mix with non-Germanics are folk traitors. It's a form of xenophilia and I wouldn't want such traits passed on to my children. Usually people who mix ethnically and racially (and sometimes their children as well) try to justify their choice and recommend it to others because it makes them feel better about themselves. Even here on Skadi, there were a few people with non-Germanic partners who displayed clear traits of xenophilia (like the guy who advised people to import Slavic wives because they're "more traditional").

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  8. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    2.) Finnish (as a language) is not Indo-European (not being part of Indo-European language tree). Does that make it not European? This could rise many pages discussion. Lets skip that matter here.
    Hmm I wouldn't say that speaking a non-Indo-European language necessarily makes one non-European anymore than speaking an Indo-European language necessarily makes one European, although yes this might be a different topic.

    On the other hand, in my opinion when it comes to mixed relationships, language may be a very important factor. Language is not only a means of communication but an integral part of culture, some would call it the soul of people. For example we all know one of those "untranslatable" words from a certain language, for which you would need to understand the language at a native or near-native level and be immersed and familiar with that culture so that you get their true meaning (the word "Waldeinsamkeit" from German, or "Hygge(lig)" from Danish). So being in a relationship with someone whose language is quite different from yours might mean there will be some hurdles. In certain languages there are several ways to express the same concept and subtle nuances can be extracted from different tones and sentence structures, while in others the same word can have totally different meanings depending on context (for example, telling someone you love them can also mean that you care about them them a lot but not necessarily that you are in love with them). Cultural differences can also initiate mixed signals.

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  10. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrd View Post
    Hmm I wouldn't say that speaking a non-Indo-European language necessarily makes one non-European anymore than speaking an Indo-European language necessarily makes one European, although yes this might be a different topic.
    Sure ... but I did't actually mean that ... what a person can be/can't be ... race wise. I more like meant is Finnish as language European language or not. But lets leave that here; okey? We hardly want to try to track the paths from theoretical Nostaratic time to present days...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrd View Post
    On the other hand, in my opinion when it comes to mixed relationships, language may be a very important factor. Language is not only a means of communication but an integral part of culture, some would call it the soul of people. For example we all know one of those "untranslatable" words from a certain language, for which you would need to understand the language at a native or near-native level and be immersed and familiar with that culture so that you get their true meaning (the word "Waldeinsamkeit" from German, or "Hygge(lig)" from Danish). So being in a relationship with someone whose language is quite different from yours might mean there will be some hurdles.
    Absolutely ... of course this is true even among of us ... many Germanics. I just was lately hiking in North with my 2 cousins and we met some Norwegians ... I could understand only part of their talks.

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    I'd say my identity is in this order: Transylvanian Saxon > ethnic German/German diaspora > German > Germanic > European.

    My people or my folk on a regional level are the Transylvanian Saxons as well as other ethnic Germans from Transylvania and Central Europe. Apart from the Transylvanian Saxons I'd say the closest local group I feel kindred with there are the Transylvanian Landler, who were Protestants exiled from Austria (due to my Protestant heritage). But there are very few Landler left here, however most of them live in close by, adjacent communities next to where I live. One of my best friends from church was of this heritage. On the next level come other ethnic German/diaspora groupings (naturally, I feel closest to the ones in my region, then Europe, then the rest of the world). Since I'm an ethnic German I feel the closest connection to peoples from the diaspora/enclaves, however on an ethnic level I feel as part of the German nation which includes the diaspora and the German countries proper: Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg. I'd include the Netherlandic peoples as a tangential part of the German nation who became more autonomous and nowadays more like our closest cousins. Then on a meta-ethnic level come the Germanic peoples, and finally other Europeans. However, even if I feel European and a historical/cultural connection to other Europeans, the Germanic identity is much stronger. To put it more specifically, I feel much more related to an American of German heritage than to a person of Hungarian, Romanian or Bulgarian heritage, despite those peoples being closer to me on a local/geographic level. But I'm also proud to be European and see Europe as a cradle of our traditional/Christian culture and civilisation.

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