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Thread: Who Do You Consider to Be Your Own People or Folk?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    Therefore someone indeed can be Bavarian, German and Germanic without there being any contradiction to each other.
    So, can you make it more clear, please? Who do you consider to be your own people or your own folk, Sigurd? The question of the thread... I want an answer to that, first of all!

    Does that mean that you consider yourself first of all Bavarian, then German, and then Germanic? And do you consider all Germanics to be your own people, or how does it go for you?


    I got your idea... in Germany that's the case with the different regions... In my country of origin is somehow similar... One could say that one is first of all Moldavian, and only then Romanian or Daco-Romanian. Or let's take Norway as an example: I noticed people cherish very much their regional origins, so someone from Bergen would say he is Bergenser first of all, and then Norwegian... I guess it's quite similar with the Bavarian/German issue.

    It seems there's a tendency nowadays to value more our regional identity, it's good that you emphasized that!



    Quote Originally Posted by Wuotans Krieger View Post
    Human identity is very complex with multiples layers that sometimes overlap. What does complicate things is when people from different nationalities intermarry. This causes confusion and in my case a lack of acceptance and so I have come to abandon any sense of 'national' identity and embrace a larger meta-ethnicity.
    Hmmm, I don't think it's that bad to have mixed ancestry, even though I can understand your issue and complains with that, having mixed ancestry myself as well. But look at the good sides of that, why not? There are many good parts about it too... And what we are we are, we should embrace who we are, not try to be someone else, and just get the best of ourselves...

    I guess it's just a matter of identity in such cases. I take examples from my country of origin, since I know better the situation there. Let's say, Mihai Eminescu, the greatest Romanian poet... He was born Mihail Eminovici, which is a Slavic name in origin, and some say he had Ukrainian roots (but I'm not sure if that's true or not). However, he considered himself to be Romanian (Daco-Romanian), he was a great nationalist and also anti-Jewish, and unfortunately ended up assassinated by the freemasons (which is not the official version on how he died, of course). He was a genius and also one of the greatest Romanians...

    Another example, Corneliu Zelea Codreanu, of whom I suppose many people here already know about. He had mixed ancestry too, German and Daco-Romanian (some say that also Ukrainian or Polish, but I don't think so). But he considered himself to be Romanian (Daco-Romanian), he was a nationalist and a great Romanian too.

    Nationality isn't always the same thing with ethnicity, though... And as I said before, different ethnic groups can be assimilated into a folk, or into a nation... So I don't see any problem with marriage between different nationalities either, as long as it's not a general practice, but only in exceptional cases. German and Austrian are different nationalities, aren't they? If we talk about nations... and about legal matters. And even with different ethnicities, again, it's a sense of identity... In my country of origin, in Bukowina region, there are many Ukrainians who already declare themselves to be Romanians as an ethnicity, but still consider Ukrainian to be their mother tongue. Or another example, not a happy one, a lot of Gypsies have Romanian citizenship, of course, and they are viewed as Romanian nationals, even though they belong to the Gypsy ethnicity, not to the Romanian one. Some even declare themselves as Romanians, not Gypsies...

    And I also don't see any problem if, for example, a Norwegian (ethnic) woman is marrying an Icelandic (ethnic) man... Or if a Faroese man is marrying a Swedish woman... or a German one... It's much more desirable than marrying Asians or other non-Europeans...

    By the way, how do your children perceive themselves? In the case of my family, those of us who have both German and Daco-Romanian ancestry, we never considered ourselves to be fully Daco-Romanian (or Romanian), or fully German... but belonging to both ethnicities. And I see it as a treasure, not as a burden. There are many wonderful things in both ethnicities, so we benefit from both heritages. I think it's a lucky mix!

    I'm sure there are many people of mixed heritage who consider one ethnicity or one nationality only, as in the examples given above...
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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    As you can tell by my ancestry list, I have quite the selection of forebears to honor. I personally consider all Germanic people to be my volk. We are all born of Wōdanaz, so to speak.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    North America unfortunately doesn't have any folks (maybe only the native Americans, who lived there before, on those lands?)... In my humble opinion, Germanic folks are only in Europe, in the fatherland or motherland of the original nations... North America is a mix of different peoples originally belonging to different folks, so there one cannot normally say that they belong to one folk, excepting the case when they connect to their original folk in Europe... The Folk is connected to the land where one's ancestors lived... the Folk has roots deep in history, for at least hundreds of years... and America is too multicultural for that... However, if people there still feel like they belong to their own folks to which they would belong if they were still living in Europe, that's great!
    After much reading and travels and studying this subject we have to make a few things very clear. Until 1776 there was no such thing as a American. The US was and is made up peoples from Northwest Europe, especially English at first, then later Germans and so on. The US even had immigration laws protecting that until 1965. So, a stone chipping primitive is not a "Native American", that title is only for ethnicities that founded the United States of America. Ask any farmer where his farm has been in his family more than a generation if he is connected to his land and he will say yes, and he is by all rights. If you even have a first generation person like myself, I still consider myself a Hoosier even though I don't live in Indiana any longer. Do I still retain many traits of my Bavarian ancestry, yes but I will always be a Hickerbilly Hoosier.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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    People of the Anglosphere

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    As somebody genetically half British, and half Baltic Prussian, who has yet to even visit Prussian soil, but always live in England, my complicated answer is that I feel quite British, though also feeling slightly different from my peers, but only of my generation. I do not feel at all modern British, these people who dare not even stand up from the gutter they are being kicked in.

    So I am probably deluding myself to consider that I feel more Prussian, I can fantasise that if I could go back in time to Prussia, they will instantly recognise me as one of their own, and I can regain that sense of belonging and community that existed here in England back in the 60s, but that was abandoned in exchange for money and Liberalism.
    And there is no modern day Prussia to burst that bubble.
    At least I can have a country to be proud of, I used to be so proud to be British, couldn't believe my luck to be born in the capital of the Worlds biggest Empire. Now though its somewhat abhorrent what this country has allowed to happen to itself.
    Prussia however, whilst it too would probably now be like Germany, so ashamed of having fought against the New World Order that it dares not wimper back in complaint of its destruction. Prussia died whilst it was still beautiful, still a country one could be proud of.

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    Interesting thread. I thought of starting a similar topic, luckily I browsed a bit through this forum before posting it.

    As far as what I consider to be American, I explained before in another thread. I will quote:

    Only those of English and/or other Germanic ancestry (including Germans, Scandinavians...)

    I base my choice on two main factors:

    1. those were the ethnicities of the first settlers in the US, who discovered & build the country and established its laws
    2. they are the most assimilable, hard working and least troublesome people, who could make good American citizens
    My true kin I consider however not only Americans, but all Germanics. I'm pretty pan-Germanic minded, so I'm quite open-minded on that. What do I consider Germanics? The predominant modern day descendants of Germanic tribes: the Scandinavians, the Anglo-Saxons, the Germans and the Netherlanders, as well as their New World/Colony descendants (Americans, Canadians, Australians, Southern Africans of Germanic heritage).

    On an individual level, my ancestry is Norwegian-American, however I am first and foremost American. I have to disagree with those assertions that Germanic folks are only in Europe, that there is no such thing as the American people or that the Americans are not connected to their land. Americans saw themselves as a kindred nation from the beginning, and we are much connected to our land! I actually dislike the term "native American" because it is discriminatory towards those who built our nation. We are as much native as the Amerindians. Remember that Europeans did not always live in the areas they currently live in either, they were once "migrants" too. I think that we Americans have lived on this land long enough to consider it our own. Besides, America (as a country) is our own creation, our ancestors fought a war of independence and shed their blood in order to build it. Even though my ancestry is Norwegian, I would still not call myself Norwegian because there are clear differences between me and a Norwegian from Norway.

    But what about those of you who are of mixed ethnicity, for example German+Swedish, or German+French, or German+Celtic, or Swedish+Finnish, or any other mix or combination?

    I think here it depends on the case. How mixed is the person, and what are the ethnicities in the mix? If both are Germanic, it's clearly Germanic. On the other hand, certain Southern cultures like Italians, or Eastern, like Russians stick out, even here in America. Germanic and Celtic are more related, however there is historically and culturally some conflict between the two, most obvious in Scotland and N. Ireland. To be honest, I don't really like those "militant" Celtic nationalists. However, Germanic and Celtic mixes are common and some Germanic countries have a Celtic substratum. So I accept some Celtic ancestry, as long as it isn't too much and the person isn't resentful towards Germanics. Finnic, I'm not sure... on the one hand Finns and Estonians seem to be close to Scandinavians and Nordics, on the other hand, there is something about Finno-Ugric culture and language that isn't very European. Some Finns for example have slanted eyes and look somewhat Mongoloid, sort of like the Saami. It would depend on the level of admixture. I would consider someone to be Germanic if they are half Germanic by blood but mostly or fully identify with the Germanic side. This doesn't mean they can't be proud of their non-Germanic side, but if push come to shove they would choose the Germanic side. Also, the non-Germanic side would need to be Europid, so racial mixes would be out of the question in my humble opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrd View Post
    Finnic, I'm not sure... on the one hand Finns and Estonians seem to be close to Scandinavians and Nordics, on the other hand, there is something about Finno-Ugric culture and language that isn't very European. Some Finns for example have slanted eyes and look somewhat Mongoloid, sort of like the Saami. It would depend on the level of admixture. I would consider someone to be Germanic if they are half Germanic by blood but mostly or fully identify with the Germanic side. This doesn't mean they can't be proud of their non-Germanic side, but if push come to shove they would choose the Germanic side. Also, the non-Germanic side would need to be Europid, so racial mixes would be out of the question in my humble opinion.
    LOL. Don't know should I reply on this now, but as here might not be any better real life expert than me ... lets go. Oh; I think I could write novel of this, but I'll try to keep my reply pretty short.

    1.) Nope, Finns are not Germanics (genetically) and they are pretty far from any other Europeans as well. Not to taking about non-Europeans.

    2.) Finnish (as a language) is not Indo-European (not being part of Indo-European language tree). Does that make it not European? This could rise many pages discussion. Lets skip that matter here.

    3.) Finns own culture? So different? This comes to up quite often (via all other Europeans, Americans etc.). I need to ask what that really is? Finns culture (today) is one kind of mold version of Sweden's culture. Yes, it has tiny pieces from Russians culture too mainly some foods (blinis + sour cream(smetana) + caviar = great ) and few Orthodox Churches). Samis and some tribes in Russia have still their own Finno-Ugric cultures alive. Not in here. There is no question that laws and regulations are more similar between Sweden and Finland than they are between Sweden and Germany, even probably more similar than they are between Sweden and Denmark. I don't start to list all great culture milestones of Finland ... but behind most of them ... we find Swede/Finnish Swede ... all the way to epic poetry Kalevala (Elias Lönnrot) or even father of modern standard Finnish language (Mikael Agricola).

    4.) Personality? Here we opposite can find clear difference between Finns and Swedes/Germanics (can be seen in every days life). Yes; some might mix this to culture ... but I see this coming at least as much from genes. Finns are more silent, more straight (= less polite) and more introvert. But they are still pretty practical, pragmatic and logical (like Germanics) ... and not lazy, day-dreamers or weepers like some other non-Germanics can be ... so the Germanics/Swedes models they have copied also fits here pretty well (which is the main key of success of Finland as a country).

    I'm here firstly as I like this forum! Genetically based on my father. I might be here also based on my mother, but that would go to mathematics ... and I don't like that. I don't either believe that this forum is keen to start to speculate topics like this: the ethnic Southern Sweden Swede (like my father) is seen as 100% Germanic, but how about ethnic Swedes living in Stockholm area etc.? Via my family's genealogy study I have some idea about this and I will sleep my nights just fine.
    But no doubt (in real life) my mother's background has also had huge impact on me! If I would be a daughter of my father but ethnic Finnish woman, living for example in Helsinki (huge mass of Finns around all the time) .... I would be someway different person. Most likely not being here (no matter as I still would be 50% Germanic), but as my identity would be someway different. I would probably still keep myself as Finnish Swede (as learned both of those languages) and I still would have relatives in Sweden, but I would not be this interesting about Scandinavia, history of Scandinavian and culture of Scandinavia. So yes ... if you go and marry person from another culture that has consequences. We can talk all day long about genetics, cheap DNA test results etc. in net forums ... but in the end of day ... how person will/can see herself/himself (self picture) ... might have huge impact to hers/his whole life.

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    Very interesting post, Finnish Swede! I didn't know many of those things, but wondered...

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    we find Swede/Finnish Swede ... all the way to epic poetry Kalevala (Elias Lönnrot)
    So... is Kalevala Finnish or... Swedish? Are the mythology and folklore described in Kalevala Finnish or Swedish? So... can Kalevala be considered Germanic too, then?

    I read Kalevala while I was in high school, back then I was reading about mythology and folklore of different European peoples... It was pretty long ago to remember very well, but as far as I remember... there are some elements which can be found in other European mythologies and folklore traditions as well... Of course, the names of the characters sound more Finnish, I think, but other than that...? Can you write what your know about these, and also which are your opinions, please?


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    But no doubt (in real life) my mother's background has also had huge impact on me!
    Sorry to ask that, I am just being curious (no other intentions): your mom is Finnish Swede, that means she is 100% Swede genetically, or how is it? I am seriously not so familiar with the situation there...

    I know... the recent discussions here about my ancestors/ genetic background... I can sleep very well at night too, by the way!

    Personally I didn't have too much contact with Finnish people, so I have no idea how one can make the difference between Swedes and Finns in Finland, and also between Finnish Swedes, Swedes and Finns... I am not even sure, what's a Finnish Swede? Is it just a Swede that lives in Finland? Being 100% Swede, but living in Finland? (Like if this precise 100% mattered...)

    I can only relate to my own limited experience, about ethnic minorities in Romania (I suppose Swedes are also an ethnic minority in Finland, am I right?), for example different German groups. In Romania there are many different groups of Germans, who came to the country in different migration waves... Besides the Saxons (the most known group), there are also the Swabians, of course the Bukovina Germans, and many other groups of Germans. Some of the differences between them consist in the context in which they migrated to Romania, from where exactly they came and also in which part of the Romania they settled. Many of them left after WW2, but some still remained... I never asked a Bukovina German how German he or she is, if he or she is 100% German or not... If researching genealogies from Bukovina Germans one finds Slavic names too, that doesn't necessarily mean they were Slavic... Slavicisation of names also occured... and also Hungarisation/ Magyarisation... So a Slavic or Hungarian name doesn't make someone genetically a Slavic or a Hungarian...

    Is it the same with Swedes in Finland? Was there any process of changing Swedish names into Finnish ones too? How do you know, from your genealogy, if someone was Finnish or Swede, if it's from Finland?

    Things like these... we cannot really know... Or can we? What do you think, Finnish Swede? And how are things there in these regards? Any process like that in Finland too, like forcing Finnish names and culture on everyone?

    And what about Russians in Finland? Any Russian influence there too? Since Russia is pretty close...

    How do you feel about all of these? And how do you relate to Finns and to Russians?


    By the way... to be more on-topic... I never considered Russians to be my own people, even though being close geographically to Russia... one can never know if there is maybe 1% Russian in theirs genealogy (during wars, unfortunately, many women were raped by foreign soldiers)... About Polish people and Ukrainians... I can relate to them much more than to Russians, since in Romania we have common border with Ukraine... and we also had common border with Poland during history... However, I don't know if I could ever consider them as my own people... From the Polish people I met so far in my life, I never felt as they were "my own people"... And Ukrainians... neither! I met even fewer Ukrainians and never related to them as "my own people"...

    But when it comes to Germans... I always relate to them as they are "my own people", or at least very close relatives to me... Of course, some Germans can be (bad in character) too, but I won't generalize a few persons like that for the whole group. Each time I go to Germany or I am into groups of Germans, I feel as I am with my own people... They speak the language of my ancestors, and also many of them look similar to my own German relatives... so... of course I consider them to be my own people...

    With Germans in Romania... here it's more complicated... the different German groups we have there have been maybe more traditional and they kept their traditions much more intact, to preserve their identities... So... it's much more difficult to relate to their specific groups, when they stick so much to their local characteristics... It's more like having "closed communities", at least this is the feeling I got sometimes... This, while some Bukovina Germans are so well integrated into the Romanian landscape... that some even consider them to be Romanians now, not Germans, even if they say they are Germans by blood... A lot of details here, why some German groups of the diaspora kept their traditions more intact, while others not so much... People adapt to the context and to the environment too...

    About other groups of Germanics... I guess I already wrote previously in this thread how I relate to them...
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Very interesting post, Finnish Swede! I didn't know many of those things, but wondered...
    You are welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    So... is Kalevala Finnish or... Swedish? Are the mythology and folklore described in Kalevala Finnish or Swedish? So... can Kalevala be considered Germanic too, then?
    Oh, you misunderstood me now. Elias Lönnrot collected those stories and someway finalized Kalevala. He walked around Finland long time ... village by village, met oldest people and collected old Finnic stories. So he did't invent them, but without him .... those stories would have been lost forever ... and he knew that. Shamanism (spiritual) form of those stories shows pretty well that they are Finnic.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    I read Kalevala while I was in high school, back then I was reading about mythology and folklore of different European peoples... It was pretty long ago to remember very well, but as far as I remember... there are some elements which can be found in other European mythologies and folklore traditions as well... Of course, the names of the characters sound more Finnish, I think, but other than that...? Can you write what your know about these, and also which are your opinions, please?
    See my reply above. What I have heard from Finns ... the original form (language/text/words) of Kalevala is someway hard to read even for native Finns. The text is so old.


    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Sorry to ask that, I am just being curious (no other intentions): your mom is Finnish Swede, that means she is 100% Swede genetically, or how is it? I am seriously not so familiar with the situation there...
    She is not 100% Swede. She has some western Finns blood too. Her ancestors came from Sweden 16th and 17th centuries to Ostrobothnia (west coast of Finland). From Södermanland, Uppland and Västmanland (basically around Stockholm ... east coast of Sweden). Via our genealogy study, we are aware of some western Finnish blood she has too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Personally I didn't have too much contact with Finnish people, so I have no idea how one can make the difference between Swedes and Finns in Finland, and also between Finnish Swedes, Swedes and Finns... I am not even sure, what's a Finnish Swede? Is it just a Swede that lives in Finland? Being 100% Swede, but living in Finland? (Like if this precise 100% mattered...)
    Differences based on what? Finns and Swedes are different. Mostly genetically, lingually ... and via their ancient histories. Still they come along pretty well (like big brother and little brother). And as like little brothers ... Finns will always try to compete and beat Swedes ... but that is nothing serious. Finnish Swedes are descendants of Swedish people who moved to Finland (700 years period as Finland belonged to Sweden). Our max share was about 20% of Finland's population 300 years ago (time then Sweden lost area of Finland to Russians). The share (%) came down half of that in next 200 years, and again in next 100 years. Now there are't many of us left anymore. Yes, we will disappear one day. 1/3 of us have moved back to Sweden. The rest? Will be diluted to Finns as time goes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Is it the same with Swedes in Finland? Was there any process of changing Swedish names into Finnish ones too? How do you know, from your genealogy, if someone was Finnish or Swede, if it's from Finland?
    Before going on this ... you better understand that Finland is officially bilingual country, just like Canada. And that has been written to our constitution (can not be changed easily). The names of cities/streets have either Finnish, Swedish or both names (upper marked one which speakers will live more on that area). Like Oulu/Uleĺborg, Turku/Ĺbo, Tampere/Tammerfors, Helsinki/Helsingfors etc. Of course as/if Swedish speaking population will disappear ... so will disappear those names.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Things like these... we cannot really know... Or can we? What do you think, Finnish Swede? And how are things there in these regards? Any process like that in Finland too, like forcing Finnish names and culture on everyone?
    As you saw above ... Swedish culture/languages position is pretty strong ... protected by laws. Of course some idiot skinhead nationalist Finns can attack against us time time and even True Finns (as a political party). But to really get something going on they should get enough their minds people in Finland's parliament. I have not faced anything negative from Finns side but I'm girl (and I don't needlessly face them) ... plus Finns guys likes looks of Swedish girls. But I know some Finnish Swedes guys who have seen better to talk Finnish and not Swedish just to avoid fights/beaten up by larger group of Finns.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    And what about Russians in Finland? Any Russian influence there too? Since Russia is pretty close...
    As I said Finland has small Orthodox parish, few churches. Some Russian foods, some Karelian foods etc. Russians influence here is actually smaller than one could first think ... mainly so as in Russian's 100years era all 5 Tsars (Alexander I, Nicholas I, Alexander II, Alexander III, Nicholas II) allowed Finland and Finns kept their autonomous position (incl. Swedish time laws, Lutheran religion etc.).
    Cold war time was not easy here either, even as we did't be under the iron cross like Eastern European slavic countries.
    Finns and Russians relationship is ''complicated''. History incl. too much too painful events (not talking about WWII here mainly/only). And as always it is a small nation/ethnic which will get hurt. Still we can not change geography (even as Finns would not want anything else/more than that). So Finns tries to live peace with Russians. But they also know Russians (thoroughly) ... and Finns saying: Ryssä on Ryssä vaikka voissa paistaisi ... is in their minds all the time. Oh, don't try to google translate that ... it won't make any sense.
    Yes, Finland has small Russian minority too. Some who came here before Finland came Independence (at Russians era) and some who has come here after Sovejt Union time. First ones (old emigrants) are seen to be loyalty into Finland.


    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    How do you feel about all of these? And how do you relate to Finns and to Russians?
    I have nothing against Finns. Normal Finns accept us too. Some might be jealous as we are bit richer (owning more) and healthier (living longer).
    What comes to Russians? I don't trust them. And I'm pro-Nato person. Would like to see Finland and Sweden joining to NATO ... but I would not take any nuclear missiles here. From Finland's border to St. Petersburg is less than 200km. Putin will not shoot his ones here either.

    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    With Germans in Romania... here it's more complicated... the different German groups we have there have been maybe more traditional and they kept their traditions much more intact, to preserve their identities... So... it's much more difficult to relate to their specific groups, when they stick so much to their local characteristics... It's more like having "closed communities", at least this is the feeling I got sometimes... This, while some Bukovina Germans are so well integrated into the Romanian landscape... that some even consider them to be Romanians now, not Germans, even if they say they are Germans by blood... A lot of details here, why some German groups of the diaspora kept their traditions more intact, while others not so much... People adapt to the context and to the environment too...
    Sorry I don't know much of this topic. Honestly I don't know much of Germanic minorities in Central Europe. Something which they don't talk much at school. Plus my personal interest has always been in Finland and in Scandinavia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Now there are't many of us left anymore. We will disappear one day. 1/3 of us have moved back to Sweden. The rest? Will be diluted to Finns as time goes.
    You mean assimilation of Swedes that Finns should be thankful for... In Romania many people with other ethnic backgrounds were assimilated too, that's why Romanian people are so... diverse... And being in such a part of the world, you can guess that into the genetic map many foreign influences have been assimilated: besides German and Magyar/ Hungarian, also Greek, Turkish and, of course, Slavic: Russian, Polish, Ukrainian. That's why Romanians are so diverse, and at least for me it's hard to relate to everyone and consider all of them as "my own people"...

    The solution to this, I think, is to have your own traditional Swede communities in Finland, more like closed communities... and not mix too much with Finns (even though this cannot be totally avoided). This is how many ethnic minorities survive in Romania, for example: Germans, Magyars/ Hungarians, and even Gypsies. They have their own closed communities, in which they preserve their own traditions... But here it depends very much also on the government and on the general mentality. Do you think this would be possible in Finland too? Do Swedes from Finland usually have a strong feeling of belonging to their own ethnic group, like you do, or not so much?

    Magyars/ Hungarians, in Romania, for example, are very much into their own group... In the villages where they are a majority they don't even speak Romanian, and some of them don't speak Romanian at all, even though Romanian language is the official language of the whole country. However, in the areas with much of a Magyar/ Hungarian population, the names of places are also written in both languages, Romanian and Magyar/ Hungarian, as you have it in Finland, both in Swedish and Finnish...

    How do I relate myself to Magyars/ Hungarians? As being different people, of course... Even though, due to assimilation of the Magyars/ Hungarians into Europe, many of them seem much more European to me than Asian (many Magyars/ Hungarians from Romania don't look Asian at all, but European)... I am mentioning this since Finns and Magyars/ Hungarians are related to each other, being probably the only big non-European group of people we had in Europe for quite a long while...

    I don't think I would choose a Magyar/ Hungarian partner though, their culture is too much different, and also the historical issues we had over time... Also, when we have traditional pottery fairs in Romania, I avoid buying things from Magyars (even though they have nice traditional art too), I prefer to buy only from Daco-Romanians, to support their work instead!

    I also lost some Magyar friends because of some nationalist statements I made a couple of years ago... That's it, if they took it personal...


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    I have not faced anything negative from Finns side but I'm girl ... and Finns guys likes looks of Swedish girls. But I know some Finnish Swedes guys who have seen better to talk Finnish and not Swedish just to avoid fights/beaten up by larger group of Finns.
    While being in "Republic of Moldova", whose government has a strong Russian influence, I also knew that it was not good to speak Romanian language on the streets, because of the Russians... Well, I did speak Romanian very loud on the streets, but I was not alone, and I also did this on purpose... I don't know if it was because I am a girl that nothing happened, or just having good luck... But yes, it's the same as in Finland there, related to Russians, even though, hey, Moldova is a Romanian territory, occupied by Russians, unfortunately...


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Still we can not change geography (even as Finns would not want anything else more than that). So Finns tries to live peace with Russians. But they also know Russians...and their sayings: Ryssä on Ryssä vaikka voissa paistaisi ... is in their minds all the time. Oh, don't try to google translate that ... it won't make any sense.
    Please... can you translate that saying for me? Or at least explain what it means...

    We always had problems with Russians too in Romania, especially in the Eastern part... Even though many Germans were traded or left Romanian territories, especially in the first years after the end of WW2, the ones left... were treated very bad by the Russians... Romanians weren't treated much different... There are other threads about these issues, and I also wrote in other places about such things...


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    What comes to Russians? I don't trust them. And I'm pro-Nato person. Would like to see Finland and Sweden joining to NATO ... but I would not take any nuclear missiles here.
    Romania is part of NATO... very strategic placed on the map too... Russians don't like it, of course.

    I don't trust Russians either. I had a closer relationship with someone who was half Daco-Romanian/ half Russian... and I had enough! Other than that... with the historical issues we had and still have, there's no more else to say...


    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Honestly I don't know much of Germanic minorities in Central Europe. Something which they don't talk much at school. Plus my personal interest has always been in Finland and in Scandinavia.
    That's normal. You don't live in Central Europe and that's not something they would include in school books... But this is where I think places like this forum are very useful, to exchange information and experiences, to learn more about the different situations in different parts of the Germanic world, and especially about the ethnic minorities in the diaspora... This is probably one of the last things they would include in mainstream education... I think it's important to discuss things like these and learn from each other's experiences (there's always something to learn in there).


    And I end this post by mentioning that... I relate much closer to the people (both Daco-Romanians and Germans) from Moldova (all parts of it), than to those from other regions in Romania... The tendency for regionalism, maybe? Bukovina is part of Moldova, so obviously I include the Bukovina Germans too... How I relate to one person or another, depends also on how they are as human beings, not only on their geographical origin or ethnic background...
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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