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Thread: Lycanthropy Among the Ancients

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    Senior Member Verđandi's Avatar
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    Lycanthropy Among the Ancients

    By Sabine Baring-Gould
    From The Book of Were-Wolves [1865]



    WHAT is Lycanthropy? The change of man or woman into the form of a wolf, either through magical means, so as to enable him or her to gratify the taste for human flesh, or through judgment of the gods in punishment for some great offence.

    This is the popular definition. Truly it consists in a form of madness, such as may be found in most asylums.

    Among the ancients this kind of insanity went by the names of Lycanthropy, Kuanthropy, or Boanthropy, because those afflicted with it believed themselves to be turned into wolves, dogs, or cows. But in the North of Europe, as we shall see, the shape of a bear, and in Africa that of a hyćna, were often selected in preference. A mere matter of taste! According to Marcellus Sidetes, of whose poem περὶ λυκανθρώπου a fragment exists, men are attacked with this madness chiefly in the beginning of the year, and become most furious in February; retiring for the night to lone cemeteries, and living precisely in the manner of dogs and wolves.

    Virgil writes in his eighth Eclogue:–

    Has herbas, atque hćc Ponto mihi lecta venena
    Ipse dedit Mœris; nascuntur plurima Ponto.
    His ego sćpe lupum fieri et se conducere sylvis
    Mœrim, sćpe animas imis excire sepulchris,
    Atque satas alio, vidi traducere messes.


    And Herodotus:

    –“It seems that the Neuri are sorcerers, if one is to believe the Scythians and the Greeks established in Scythia; for each Neurian changes himself, once in the year, into the form of a wolf, and he continues in that form for several days, after which he resumes his former shape.”–(Lib. iv. c. 105.) See also Pomponius Mela (lib. ii. c. 1) “There is a fixed time for each Neurian, at which they change, if they like, into wolves, and back again into their former condition.”

    But the most remarkable story among the ancients is that related by Ovid in his “Metamorphoses,” of Lycaon, king of Arcadia, who, entertaining Jupiter one day, set before him a hash of human flesh, to prove his omniscience, whereupon the god transferred him into a wolf:–[1]

    In vain he attempted to speak; from that very instant
    His jaws were bespluttered with foam, and only he thirsted
    For blood, as he raged amongst flocks and panted for slaughter.
    His vesture was changed into hair, his limbs became crooked;
    A wolf,–he retains yet large trace of his ancient expression,
    Hoary he is as afore, his countenance rabid,
    His eyes glitter savagely still, the picture of fury.


    Pliny relates from Evanthes, that on the festival of Jupiter Lycćus, one of the family of Antćus was selected by lot, and conducted to the brink of the Arcadian lake. He then hung his clothes on a tree and plunged into the water, whereupon he was transformed into a wolf.

    Nine years after, if he had not tasted human flesh, he was at liberty to swim back and resume his former shape, which had in the meantime become aged, as though he had worn it for nine years. Agriopas relates, that Demćnetus, having assisted at an Arcadian human sacrifice to Jupiter Lycćus, ate of the flesh, and was at once transformed into a wolf, in which shape he prowled about for ten years, after which he recovered his human form, and took part in the Olympic games.

    The following story is from Petronius:–

    My master had gone to Capua to sell some old clothes. I seized the opportunity, and persuaded our guest to bear me company about five miles out of town; for he was a soldier, and as bold as death. We set out about cockcrow, and the moon shone bright as day, when, coming among some monuments. my man began to converse with the stars, whilst I jogged along singing and counting them. Presently I looked back after him, and saw him strip and lay his clothes by the side of the road. My heart was in my mouth in an instant, I stood like a corpse; when, in a crack, he was turned into a wolf. Don’t think I’m joking: I would not tell you a lie for the finest fortune in the world.

    But to continue: after he was turned into a wolf, he set up a howl and made straight for the woods. At first I did not know whether I was on my head or my heels; but at last going to take up his clothes, I found them turned into stone. The sweat streamed from me, and I never expected to get over it. Melissa began to wonder why I walked so late. ‘Had you come a little sooner,’ she said, ‘you might at least have lent us a hand; for a wolf broke into the farm and has butchered all our cattle; but though be got off, it was no laughing matter for him, for a servant of ours ran him through with a pike. Hearing this I could not close an eye; but as soon as it was daylight, I ran home like a pedlar that has been eased of his pack. Coming to the place where the clothes had been turned into stone, I saw nothing but a pool of blood; and when I got home, I found my soldier lying in bed, like an ox in a stall, and a surgeon dressing his neck. I saw at once that he was a fellow who could change his skin (versipellis), and never after could I eat bread with him, no, not if you would have killed me. Those who would have taken a different view of the case are welcome to their opinion; if I tell you a lie, may your genii confound me!”

    As every one knows, Jupiter changed himself into a bull; Hecuba became a bitch; Actćon a stag; the comrades of Ulysses were transformed into swine; and the daughters of Prœtus fled through the fields believing themselves to be cows, and would not allow any one to come near them, lest they should be caught and yoked.

    S. Augustine declared, in his De Civitate Dei, that he knew an old woman who was said to turn men into asses by her enchantments.

    Apuleius has left us his charming romance of the Golden Ass, in which the hero, through injudicious use of a magical salve, is transformed into that long-eared animal.

    It is to be observed that the chief seat of Lycanthropy was Arcadia, and it has been very plausibly suggested that the cause might he traced to the following circumstance:

    –The natives were a pastoral people, and would consequently suffer very severely from the attacks and depredations of wolves. They would naturally institute a sacrifice to obtain deliverance from this pest, and security for their flocks. This sacrifice consisted in the offering of a child, and it was instituted by Lycaon.

    From the circumstance of the sacrifice being human, and from the peculiarity of the name of its originator, rose the myth.

    But, on the other hand, the story is far too widely spread for us to attribute it to an accidental origin, or to trace it to a local source. Half the world believes, or believed in, were-wolves, and they were supposed to haunt the Norwegian forests by those who had never remotely been connected with Arcadia: and the superstition had probably struck deep its roots into the Scandinavian and Teutonic minds, ages before Lycaon existed; and we have only to glance at Oriental literature, to see it as firmly engrafted in the imagination of the Easterns.

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    Senior Member Astragoth's Avatar
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    I always took werewolves to be a metaphorical explanation of a serial killer. What is a werewolf? A person that periodically transforms into a monster and preys on the innocent.
    That sounds a lot like someone like Ted Bundy to me.

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    and the moon shone bright as day, when, coming among some monuments. my man began to converse with the stars, whilst I jogged along singing and counting them.
    When the Moon is filled and "Twin of the Sun , bright as day" , then it is difficult to "count" stars ,
    except in the opposite direction of the moon , then probably where the sun should be located .

    In the winter time , when the frost bites , and the wolves are more hungry than usual ,
    wolves might attack humans more often , than in times of unfenced borders , and plenty of sheep on the law low loaned lawn .

    In the summer time in Northern Europe the heaven does not become black to the north ,
    and even counting stars is not so easy .


    Hairy Man , Telly Man .


    The constellation Pisces I consider the head of the Wolf .
    The Chinese Constellation Tiger , but could also be Taurus for the Red Stars .
    Wolf and Tiger are camouflaged by their furs , somehow invisible like the dim constellations Pisces and Cancer ,
    without any bright stars .

    The Quran says , God would be fast at numbers , counting , billing .



    Trump and Merkel are both Full-Moon The Silverling people .
    Jesus likely too , and Judas the hairy New-Moon .
    Twin Jacob Israel had been the Full-Moon , and Esau the hairy New-Moon with the Sun-Red Ribbon .
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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