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Thread: Halloween Costumes

  1. #11
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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Impossible! The term Halloween is entirely Christian. Halloween is 'Hallow E'en' , Holy Evening - it is the Vigil of All Saints (All Hallow's Eve.) Samhain by the Old Calendar falls would fall around Nov. 11th, almost two weeks after Halloween.

    The Sarum usage of the Roman rite contains the old Anglo-Saxon and Celtic Christian material for the Vigil of All Saints (a modern English way of saying Halloween.) If need be I can post the liturgical material for Halloween as it was celebrated on that day. Nothing 'pagan' about it.
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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Halloween is one thing I will miss about the US. They don't celebrate it here.

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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Quote Originally Posted by Frontiersman
    Impossible! The term Halloween is entirely Christian. Halloween is 'Hallow E'en' , Holy Evening - it is the Vigil of All Saints (All Hallow's Eve.) Samhain by the Old Calendar falls would fall around Nov. 11th, almost two weeks after Halloween.

    The Sarum usage of the Roman rite contains the old Anglo-Saxon and Celtic Christian material for the Vigil of All Saints (a modern English way of saying Halloween.) If need be I can post the liturgical material for Halloween as it was celebrated on that day. Nothing 'pagan' about it.
    It was a pagan celebration. I'll post something on this later on.
    (It doesn't matter how old the song is, I won't stop liking it).

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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    The Irish English dictionary published by the Irish Texts Society defines the word as follows: "Samhain, All Hallowtide, the feast of the dead in Pagan and Christian times, signalizing the close of harvest and the initiation of the winter season, lasting till May, during which troops (esp. the Fiann) were quartered. Faeries were imagined as particularly active at this season. From it the half year is reckoned. also called Feile Moingfinne (Snow Goddess).(1) The Scottish Gaelis Dictionary defines it as "Hallowtide. The Feast of All Soula. Sam Fuin = end of summer."(2) Contrary to the information published by many organizations, there is no archaeological or literary evidence to indicate that Samhain was a deity. The Celtic Gods of the dead were Gwynn ap Nudd for the British, and Arawn for the Welsh. The Irish did not have a "lord of death" as such. The Celts were a pastoral people as opposed to an agricultural people. The end of summer was significant to them because it meant the time of year when the structure of their lives changed radically. The cattle were brought down from the summer pastures in the hills and the people were gathered into the houses for the long winter nights of story- telling and handicrafts.

    The Celts believed that when people died, they went to a land of eternal youth and happiness called Tir nan Og. They did not have the concept of heaven and hell that the Christian church later brought into the land. The dead were sometimes believed to be dwelling with the Fairy Folk, who lived in the numerous mounds or sidhe (pron. "shee") that dotted the Irish and Scottish countryside. Samhain was the new year to the Celts. In the Celtic belief system, turning points, such as the time between one day and the next, the meeting of sea and shore, or the turning of one year into the next were seen as magickal times. The turning of the year was the most potent of these times. This was the time when the "veil between the worlds" was at its thinnest, and the living could communicate with their beloved dead in Tir nan Og.
    The Celts did not have demons and devils in their belief system. The fairies, however, were often considered hostile and dangerous to humans because they were seen as being resentful of men taking over their lands. On this night, they would sometimes trick humans into becoming lost in the fairy mounds, where they would be trapped forever. After the coming of the Christians to the Celtic lands, certain of the folk saw the fairies as those angels who had sided neither with God or with Lucifer in their dispute, and thus, were condemned to walk the earth until judgment day.(3) In addition to the fairies, many humans were abroad on this night, causing mischief. since this night belonged neither to one year or the other, Celtic folk believed that chaos reigned and the people would engage in "horseplay and practical jokes".(4) This served also as a final outlet for high spirits before the gloom of winter set in. During the course of these hijinks, many of the people would imitate the fairies and go from house to house begging for treats. Failure to supply the treats would usually result in practical jokes being visited on the owner of the house. Since the fairies were abroad on this night, an offering of food or milk was frequently left for them on the steps of the house, so the homeowner could gain the blessings of the "good folk" for the coming year. Many of the households would also leave out a "dumb supper" for the spirits of the departed.(5) The folks who were abroad in the night imitating the fairies would some- times carry turnips carved to represent faces. This is the origin of our modern Jack-o-lantern.

    Celtic religion was very closely tied to the Earth. Their great legends are concerned with momentous happenings which took place around the time of Samhain. many of the great battles and legends of kings and heroes center on this night. Many of the legends concern the promotion of fertility of the earth and the insurance of the continuance of the lives of the people through the dark winter season. Animals were certainly killed at this time of year. This was the time to "cull" from the herds those animals which were not desired for breeding purposes for the next year. Most certainly, some of these would have been done in a ritualistic manner for the use of the priesthood.
    Folk tradition tells us of many divination practices associated with Samhain. Among the most common were divinations dealing with marriage, weather, and the coming fortunes for the year. These were performed via such methods as ducking for apples, and apple peeling. Ducking for apples was a marriage divination. The first person to bite an apple would be the first to marry in the coming year. Apple peeling was a divination tosee how long your life would be. The longer the unbroken apple peel, the longer your life was destined to be.(9) In Scotland, people would place stones in the ashes of the hearth before retiring for the night. Anyone whose stone had been disturbed during the night was said to be destined to die during the coming year.
    When the potato crop in Ireland failed, many of the Irish people, modern day descendents of the Celts, immigrated to America, bringing with them their folk practices, which are the remnants of the Celtic festival observances.

    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Foru.../hallorig.html
    (It doesn't matter how old the song is, I won't stop liking it).

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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    The problem is that Halloween does *not* have roots in Samhain. Halloween began as a feast of the Roman Church in Italy, not in Gaelic territory nor in response to Gaelic pagan religion. The fact that it falls on the same day has more to do with the universality of seasonal change, and the connection of cold with death. Winter being the beginning of the 'dying season' in any area that had winters more than mild. Halloween - established by a Roman council in Rome. Samhain - Gaelic beginning of winter feast. Neither is related to the other.

    The idea that 'Celtic pagan survivals' existed in Irish Catholic culture is unproven, and *highly* unlikely. Especially considering that the Potato Famine Irish had been stripped of native Irish Catholic practices and replaced it with Franciscan/Dominican Continental practices with devotion to Sacred Heart, Lourdes, Novenas, and all the things one would have never found in Irish Catholicism circa the 1500s, 1200s, 900s, or 600s.

    If you'd read the link provided, you'd notice that Rowan Moonstone's 'Fluff-Bunny Wicca' version of history is critiqued as well.
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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    The info was taken from the recourses below that page. The same info comes from other sites, the same stuff. Halloween itself is actually pagan, not Xtian and some Christians refuse to celebrate it because of it's pagan origins. Regardless of the exact name and date, the season of the spirit was celebrated throughout Europe.
    (It doesn't matter how old the song is, I won't stop liking it).

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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenDice
    The info was taken from the recourses below that page. The same info comes from other sites, the same stuff. Halloween itself is actually pagan, not Xtian and some Christians refuse to celebrate it because of it's pagan origins. Regardless of the exact name and date, the season of the spirit was celebrated throughout Europe.
    The truth is Halloween incoporates both Pagan and Christian elements.

    It's true some Christians refuse to celebrate Halloween but it's not because they are objecting to its pagan origins. It's because they think some aspects of Halloween are "Satanic".

    Anyways I'll probably be a Viking this year. In years past I have gone as a Christian Knight(Templar),Robin Hood,Spider Man, and Super Man.

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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Quote Originally Posted by Frontiersman
    Impossible! The term Halloween is entirely Christian. Halloween is 'Hallow E'en' , Holy Evening - it is the Vigil of All Saints (All Hallow's Eve.)
    Actually Halloween is "All Hallow's Eve", which is the eve of All Hallow's Day (November 1st).

    All Hallow's Eve has nothing to do with All Saint's Day, other than the fact they represent the collision of two cultures.

    Don't forget, in its campaign to convert pagan populations to christianity the catholic church transformed their local gods into saints and build early churches on sacred pagan ground. The policy of the day was assimilate what you can't destroy.

    Halloween, with its emphasis on the supernatural and the macabre, marks a revival of the pagan feast of the dead -- in an albeit commercialized form.

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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenDice
    The info was taken from the recourses below that page. The same info comes from other sites, the same stuff. Halloween itself is actually pagan, not Xtian and some Christians refuse to celebrate it because of it's pagan origins. Regardless of the exact name and date, the season of the spirit was celebrated throughout Europe.
    You still aren't recognizing the illogic of that idea. Samhain was *Gaelic*, Halloween is *Roman* - Halloween was imported along with Roman liturgical books from Italy to Britain and Ireland, and not the other way around. Samhain had no influence on the Roman Church's decision to place All Saints at that point in the calendar. In fact, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr pointed out that the main reason for Roman placement of All Saints and All Souls on that day was because of the oral tradition of it being the same date as Noah's deluge. When Rome founded the practice of Halloween, it was not in reference to any Roman pagan feast either - the Roman religion not being exactly concordant with the Gaelic. (Samhain isn't even universally Celtic, but only Gaelic.)

    By the way 'Xtian' is meant to be an offensive term, but like Xmas actually is being very respectful as it points back to the Hellenic origins Xristos/Christ as in the Chrisma/Labarum = XP or Chi Rho.

    Groups that don't celebrate Halloween tend to be either: a) Protestant, which are another religion separated from Christianity, or b) Eastern Orthodox because the Eastern liturgical tradition placed their feast for the departed in the spring. Some modern bishops of the anti-Western party have told their people not to participate in Halloween, meaning the modern American drunken/drugged bash reveling in witches and vampires. American Halloween, unlike Halloween still celebrated by Anglicans, Roman Catholics, and Western Orthodox, has nothing to do with Samhain, and is only indirectly descended from real Halloween - it is something rather that came out of urban squalor in places such as Baltimore. Read the link.
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    Post Re: Halloween Costumes

    Quote Originally Posted by Elistariel
    actually this is probably what I'll be wearing around Halloween. These photos are about 5 years old.
    I love the costume, Elistariel. Where'd you get it?

    If I had the means to find it here I'd go around with the lady or the warrior costume. However even if they were available the real deal folk costumes cost about a couple thousand dollars, so.

    I do have the dagger though!

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