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Thread: Denmark was offered to Germany

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    Denmark was offered to Germany

    The Danish King Christian IX allegedly offered Denmark to the Prussian King Wilhelm I in July 1864. This was apparently a desperate effort to keep the south Jutland regions of Schleswig and Holstein within Denmark, following the Danes’ defeat by the German forces.

    German-Danish War, also called Second Schleswig War, (1864), the second of two conflicts over the settlement of the Schleswig-Holstein question, a complex of problems arising from the relationship of the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein to Denmark, to each other, and to the German Confederation. Involved in it were a disputed succession, a clash of Danish and German nationalism, and a threat to the international balance of power.

    German-Danish War | European history | Britannica.com

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    Later: The Schleswig plebiscite was actually two referendums, organized according to the Treaty of Versailles in 1919,


    with the purpose of determining the future border between Germany and Denmark. The referendums were monitored by representatives from France, the United Kingdom, Norway, and Sweden.

    Schleswig, located at the southern end of the Jutland Peninsula, had originally been a Danish province. Following the War of Schleswig in 1864, the territory was awarded to the Kingdom of Prussia by the Treaty of Vienna. It eventually became part of the Prussian Province of Schleswig-Holstein. In 1871, Schleswig-Holstein became part of the newly founded German Empire.

    After World War I, the Danish, who were neutral during the war, divided the province into three zones, in which separate referendums would be held.

    Zone I encompassed the northern and largest part of Schleswig. Zone I was about 75% ethnic Danish and 25% ethnic Germans, but some towns in the zone did have majority ethnic German populations. The referendum for Zone I was held on February 10, 1920, and it voted to become part of Denmark, today, the Danish Province of South Jutland.

    Zone II was formed from the central part of the province. Zone II was about 80% ethnic German and 20% ethnic Danish. The referendum for Zone II was held on March 14, 1920, and it voted to remain part of Germany.

    Zone III was the southernmost part of the province, and it was almost entirely ethnic German. No referendum was held in Zone III, as the outcome was obvious.

    Through these referendums, Denmark was able to reclaim a substantial portion of the province that they had lost to Prussia in 1864. The outcome of the referendums was peaceful, and the border between Denmark and Germany that was established in 1920 remains to this day.

    Schleswig Plebiscite - 1920
    The nation state is a nineteenth / twentieth century creation, based on a disarmed populace ruled from a big capital city.
    Look where it has and will take us.

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    This is an example like Poland and Texas , where welcomed or even invited mass immigration could lead
    to rebellion and secession several decades and centuries later .

    Also here the stereotype , that immigrants tend to move into the bigger cities ,
    as we see this today .

    As a schoolchild , that topic had been taught to us , but probably not south of the Elbe river .


    I really wondered therefore , why the U.N. did not made a referendum for the many Yugoslav states .

    Such a referendum would probably have been made , if Greece , not directly involved in the Civil War of Yugoslavia in the 1990s ,
    or even Turkey or Italy would have asked for the Yugoslavians becomming nationals of the Hellenic ,
    Roman or Ottoman Empire , or oherwise stay on their own .


    By the way :
    My username is a Constitutional Advocate from these times in the 19th century , trying to get Schleswig-Holstein
    independent from both Prussia-Germany Frankfurt and Danish Kopenhagen .


    And it seems , that there had not been the Jewish Question at these times , but at least also the Schleswig-Holstein Question :
    The Schleswig-Holstein Question (German: Schleswig-Holsteinische Frage; Danish: Spørgsmålet om Sønderjylland og Holsten) ...

    ...

    This question is of great interest to students of international law
    and as illustrating the practical problems involved in asserting the modern principle of nationality.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schl...stein_Question


    https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volk...g_in_Schleswig
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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