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Thread: Germanic Headcoverings

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    Germanic Headcoverings

    I've the idea from the folk costumes thread. I've an interest in headcoverings like veils, bonnets, wimples, hennins, kerchiefs, gable hoods, or even hats and caps worn by Germanic women throughout history. Not only religious but also parts of folk costumes, for holidays or peasant dress.

    Until the latter 20th century, headscarves were commonly worn by women in many parts of the Europe and the Americas, as well as some other parts of the world. In recent decades, headscarves, like hats, have fallen out of favor in Western culture. Until at least the 18th century, the wearing of a headcovering for the hair was regarded as customary for Christian women to agree with contemporary notions of modesty and as an indication of married status; the "matron's cap" is a general term for these. Nuns cover their heads because it is written in the Bible they must be covered while prophesising. In fact, Christian women were first to cover their hair. Muslims were influenced by Byzantine Christians. In early 700, Orthodox Christian women wore head coverings in accordance with the Apostle Paul's command in 1st Corinthians for women to cover their heads in worship.

    Some examples of headwear from nowadays and other religious traditions:

    Amish



    Amish Woman's Covering Cap Kapp Bonnet with strings



    Amish volunteers



    Mennonite Woman



    German Baptist Brethren Woman



    17th Century Village at Plimoth Plantation - Plymouth, Massachusetts



    Puritan



    Early Quaker



    Quaker



    Shaker





    Hutterite



    Bruderhof


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    https://www.shelaghlewins.com/reenac...ans_outfit.htm

    A Reconstructed Saxon Woman's Outfit



    That would now be regarded by many as almost as unacceptable as Islamic dress. The past is a different country.

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    A wimple is an ancient form of female headdress, formed of a large piece of cloth worn around the neck and chin, and covering the top of the head. Its use developed in early medieval Europe. At many stages of medieval Christian culture it was unseemly for a married woman to show her hair. A wimple might be elaborately starched, and creased and folded in prescribed ways, and later elaborated versions were supported on wire or wicker framing, such as the cornette. Today the wimple is worn by certain nuns who retain a traditional habit.
    A wimple as shown in Portrait of a Woman, circa 1430-1435, by Robert Campin (1375/1379–1444), National Gallery, London. The cloth is 4-ply and the pins holding it in place are visible at the top of the head



    Portrait of a Young Woman (or Lady Wearing a Gauze Headdress), 1435–1440 by the Netherlandish artist Rogier van der Weyden.



    Portrait of a Lady (or Portrait of a Woman), same painter



    Revival clothing





    Veil and wimple


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    Viking women also wore some type of head covering.















    Here a blog post detailing the infos on Viking age head coverings: https://ciarsstitchintime.wordpress....ead-coverings/

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    During medieval times it was difficult to imagine a person without headwear. Excluding the children, it was compulsory to wear head pieces whether they were men or women belonging to all ages. At that time headwears were not only decorative pieces but also played a part in defining people's etiquettes and elegancy, moreover it was a part of social standing of people in society.

    We can say that the war for piece of land and supremacy had led to the emergency of headwears. Some coverings were used to protect the head from serious injuries which gradually enter into civilization. Since the beginning of medieval period, as medieval costumes headwears too were essential part of attire. Throughout the medieval history with the development in tailoring skill of people and technology, head covers too had gone through a great degree of changes.

    During late medieval period, everyone in European country used to wear head pieces which in their modern avtar are equally famous among masses. It was allowed for Italian women to uncover their head while the women's of other countries cover their head with wimple, barbet and fillet.

    Fillet, a narrow head band was worn by unmarried women and by certain monks along with a wimple, it was a garment which underpass through chin to give support to linen cap or coif and a veil.



    Another accessory crespines used to confine the hair from both side of head were generally made of wire or knitted mesh. During the same period, Italian women abolished the use of head wears with transparent head gauzes.



    In today's times wimples are more common among nuns who are still attached to traditional way of wearing caps. In the meanwhile it was allowed for men to keep their head uncover.

    With the beginning of fifteenth century, an era of expensive and extravagant clothes started which were huge and voluminous in size and gracious in look. To enhance the overall look of attire head coverings too became stylish, lased with jewelries and feathers. Crespines too come in its developed form, now they were used to gather hair in head's back. At that time Hennin was the most expensive hair-dress styled in styled in cone or steeple shape. This hair-dress had wired frame which was covered by fabric and had an attached veil. As for men, vest and doublets were more common. Their tall crowned hats with or without brims displayed their status in society.



    Heartshaped Henin



    Another Heart-shaped Henin



    Truncated Henin



    Conical Henin

    When the renaissance era rises, head-wears also came in its best form. They were now more elaborate and had finely detailed designs. Emergence of different styles of renaissance costumes in different part of Europe led to the designing of more elaborative headgears to match their dresses. Gabble hood, a headgear had
    embroidered lappets was famous among English women.



    Gabble Hood

    French hood as the name suggest was famous in France. It was round in shape, worn over veil in back of head.



    French Hood

    Centrally parted hair was confined in veil.



    Men wore large hats and German Barrett was popular among them.
    http://www.historyandwomen.com/2011/...al-period.html

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    Dutch cap or Dutch bonnet is a style of woman's hat associated with the various traditional Dutch woman's costumes. Usually made of white cotton or lace, it is sometimes characterized by triangular flaps or wings that turn up on either side. It can resemble some styles of nurse's hat.

    Dutch working girl (17th century) as portrayed by Johannes Vermeer



    Volendam, North Holland, the Netherlands



    Volendam. Philips postcard, photo by Maurits Binger, ca. 1911



    Zeeland



    Licht festival 2017 in Amsterdam



    Eindhoven



    NoordBrabant



    Frisian Head Dress



    Friesland


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    Wilhelm Petersen “Junge Friesin”, 1938 ”



    Young Frisian woman in native dress







    Friesian woman in traditional costume with the German cap



    Friesland ca. 1780. Woman with "German cap" dressed for a funeral. Drawing by Jan Duyvetter.



    18th century Frisian costume



    Frisian Tracht from the North Sea isle of Föhr



    Woman from Helgoland (German Archipelago in the North Sea)


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    All women wore their hair covered. It dates back to the tradition of women covering their hair "lest they temp angels".
    Only prostitutes wore their hair uncovered. Thats why if you caught a woman naked back in medieval times and she had only one towel
    she'd cover her hair before she covered her body.

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    Vorarlberg Tracht



    Zillertal Tracht



    Headgear from Schaumburg Lippe in Lower Saxony



    Alsatian Costume



    Thuringia



    Transylvanian Saxon



    Donauschwaben Bride



    Bregenzerwald



    Schwarzwälder Tracht



    Silesia


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    Modern renditions of various costumes




























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