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Thread: Germanic Headcoverings

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    A little bit history about the bonnet, a common headpiece for Germanic women in the past:

    Until the late 19th century bonnet seems to have been the preferred term for most types of hats worn by women, while "hat" was more reserved for male headgear, and female styles that resembled them, typically either in much smaller versions perched on top of the head, or versions with very wide brims all the way round. In the mid-17th and 18th century house bonnets worn by women and girls were generally brimless headcoverings which were secured by tying under the chin, and which covered no part of the forehead. They were worn indoors, to keep the hair tidy, and outdoors, to keep dust out of the hair. With hairstyles becoming increasingly elaborate after 1770, the calash was worn outdoors to protect the hair from wind and weather: a hood of silk stiffened with whalebone or arched cane battens, collapsible like a fan or the calash top of a carriage, they were fitted with ribbons to allow them to be held secure in a gale.

    From Waterloo, more structured fashionable bonnets made by milliners rapidly grew larger. A plate in La Belle Assemblée 1817 showed a

    Bonnet of vermillion-coloured satin, embossed with straw, ornamented slightly with straw-coloured ribbands, and surmounted by a bouquet formed of a full blown damask rose and buds, with ears of ripe corn. This ornament is partially placed on one side: the edge of the bonnet finished by blond [lace] laid on strait.

    This was specified as a carriage dress, with the understanding that when taking the air in an open carriage, the bonnet provided some privacy—such a bonnet was in fact an invisible in Paris—and prevent wind-chapping, with its connotations of countrified rude health. Straw was available again after 1815: the best straw bonnets came from Leghorn. As a bonnet developed a peak, it would extend from the entire front of the bonnet, from the chin over the forehead and down the other side of the face. Some styles of bonnets between ca 1817 and 1845 had a large peak which effectively prevented women from looking right or left without turning their heads: a "coal-scuttle" or "poke" bonnet. Others had a wide peak which was angled out to frame the face. In the 1840s it might be crimped at the top to frame the face in a heart shape. As the bonnet became more complicated, under it might be worn a lace cornette to hold the hair in place.

    The lack of a clear distinction between hats and bonnets can be seen in these extracts from Harper's Bazaar in 1874: (On "Paris Fashions", by Emmeline Raymond, 11 April) "There is no change in bonnets. So long as the hair is piled on top of the head, the little device which takes the place of a dress cap must remain as it is. The brims are generally flattened at the sides, swelling above the front, and turned up behind in order to make room for the hair, which would not find room whereon to lodge if the precaution were not taken, here and there, to punch out what is called a brim of what is called a bonnet. It is said, however, that straw hats of the Pamela shape are in preparation, that is, turned up behind, but shading the forehead. It would be so sensible to wear a bonnet that would protect the face from the sun that I give this news with due caution. For my part, I can not believe it." A week before, ("New York Fashions", 4 April): "Strings are seldom seen, and this does away with the last distinguishing feature between bonnets and round hats; the same head-covering now serves for each, as it is a bonnet when worn far back on the head, and a hat when tilted forward."

    Bonnets remained one of the most common types of headgear worn by women throughout most of the 19th century. For a widow, a bonnet was de rigueur. Silk bonnets, elaborately pleated and ruched, were worn outdoors, or in public places like shops, galleries, churches, and during visits to acquaintances. The idea was that women would cover their heads with caps out of modesty. In addition, women in wedlock would wear caps and bonnets during the day.

    Under the French Second Empire, parasols took the place of protection from sun, and bonnets became smaller and smaller, until they could only be held on the head with hatpins. As hats came back into style, bonnets were increasingly worn by women who wanted to appear modest in public, with the result that bonnets accumulated connotations of dowager wear and dropped from fashion except on the prairies.

    Most middle-class women in the 19th century would have had at least two bonnets, one suitable for summer weather, often made from straw, and one made from heavier fabric for winter wear. This is where the tradition of an Easter bonnet originated, when women would switch from their winter bonnet to their summer bonnet. Wealthier women would have many bonnets, suitable for different occasions.

    Women of some religious groups have continued to wear bonnets for worship or everyday clothing. This is especially the case among plain people, such as plain-dressing Friends (Quakers), Old Order Mennonites and the Amish. Bonnets were adopted by the Salvation Army as part of uniform regalia for women. Initially, Salvation Army bonnets were introduced as protection for women soldiers and were reinforced with black tar to turn them into helmets. Later versions were smaller when there was no longer any need for protection. The bonnet has now been replaced with a bowler hat.

    In France, single women wear elaborate yellow and green bonnets to honor St. Catherine's Day on November 25. The French expression coiffer Sainte-Catherine ('don St. Catherine's bonnet'), an idiom that describes an unmarried woman of 25 years or older, derives from this custom.
    Bonnets in a Swedish fashion plate from 1838



    White Pioneer Bonnet



    White Victorian or Edwardian historical bonnet



    Wagon Trail Colonial Prairie Bonnet



    Women's Silk Night Cap

    #

    Womens White Bonnet Medieval Hat


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  3. #12
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    Headcoverings from the Tudor era

    Most women of the early sixteenth century Tudor court wore the gable headdress in its many forms, and later wore the French Hood. However there are several images of women in other forms of head wear.



    This drawing is probably a preliminary sketch for the painting of Thomas More's family done during Holbein's first visit to England, 1526-28.



    Probably drawn during Holbein's first visit, 1526-28.



    "Mary Howard, daughter of Thomas, third Duke of Norfolk and sister of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, born 1519; married Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, natural son of Henry VIII by Elizabeth Blount, in or after 1533; died 1557."



    This and the following drawings were probably done during Holbein's second stay in England, 1532 until his untimely death there by plague in 1543.



    The hat appears to have a brim. The undercap appears to have a tie under the chin.



    The hat appears to have a brim. The undercap appears to have a tie under the chin. Note the similarity to the cap worn by the picture labeled "Anna Bollein, Queen" below.



    Labeled "Anna Bollein, Queen," the attribution is considered incorrect by Parker.



    Portrait of a Woman, c. 1532-35, Holbein. Linen shawl pinned on. Linen cap and wool hat.



    Lady with a Squirrel by Holbein
    The source: https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/bonnet.html

    Tudor Gable Headdress

    No gown is complete without the appropriate accessories, and for the early 16th century English woman those accessories would include some form of head covering. The following is a collection of images depicting the gable headdress, with an emphasis on the version that was popular from the 1520-40s.



    Lady Guildford, c. 1527



    Portrait of an English Lady, c. 1527, Holbein



    Jane Seymour, 1537



    Frances, Countess of Surrey, c. 1535



    Unknown
    https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/gable.html

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    HOODS - examples of historical hoods

    French Hood - a small hood made on a stiff foundation and worn far back. The front border, fitting close round the head, was curved forward on either side to end over the ears, the hair being exposed above this limit only. The back of the crown was raised into a horseshoe-shaped curve over the head.

    Gable Hood or English Hood- so-called because its pointed shape resembled the Gable of a house. Originally a simple pointed hood with decorated side panels called lappets and a veil at the back, over time the gable hood became a complex construct with a box-shaped back and two tube-shaped hanging veils; the hanging veils & lappets could be pinned up in a variety of ways.

    Atifet (flattened or heart shaped bonnet) - Similar to the French hood style but modified with a heart shaped crescent - favoured by Mary Queen of Scots. Lace trimmings were added.

    French Hoods, as reinterpreted by the Tudors (in embellished fabric)











    Gable Hoods or English Hoods







    Atifets (Heart shaped bonnets)





    More on this page: http://www.thetudorswiki.com/page/HO...+on+The+Tudors

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    German costumes from Baden:



    Tyrol:



    Bavaria:



    Schwarzwald:



    Bodensee:





    Bregenzerwald:



    Swiss Costumes:










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    Quote Originally Posted by Siebenbürgerin View Post
    I've the idea from the folk costumes thread. I've an interest in headcoverings like veils, bonnets, wimples, hennins, kerchiefs, gable hoods, or even hats and caps worn by Germanic women throughout history. Not only religious but also parts of folk costumes, for holidays or peasant dress.

    Until the latter 20th century, headscarves were commonly worn by women in many parts of the Europe and the Americas, as well as some other parts of the world. In recent decades, headscarves, like hats, have fallen out of favor in Western culture. Until at least the 18th century, the wearing of a headcovering for the hair was regarded as customary for Christian women to agree with contemporary notions of modesty and as an indication of married status; the "matron's cap" is a general term for these. Nuns cover their heads because it is written in the Bible they must be covered while prophesising. In fact, Christian women were first to cover their hair. Muslims were influenced by Byzantine Christians. In early 700, Orthodox Christian women wore head coverings in accordance with the Apostle Paul's command in 1st Corinthians for women to cover their heads in worship.

    Some examples of headwear from nowadays and other religious traditions:

    Amish



    Amish Woman's Covering Cap Kapp Bonnet with strings



    Amish volunteers



    Mennonite Woman



    German Baptist Brethren Woman



    17th Century Village at Plimoth Plantation - Plymouth, Massachusetts



    Puritan



    Early Quaker



    Quaker



    Shaker





    Hutterite



    Bruderhof

    They look horrendous and have nothing at all to do with authentic GERMANIC costume. This is 18th century AMERICAN Christian!

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