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Thread: Swedish General Election 2018

  1. #11
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    Election observer from Denmark:

    "Under alla valobservationer jag har varit på har jag aldrig sett ett val så odemokratiskt som det svenska. Det är långt ifrån europeisk standard"
    https://nyadagbladet.se/inrikes/valo...som-i-sverige/

    So there's already a systemic problem, plus that the left manipulates it further...
    Ein Leben ist nichts, deine Sprosse sind alles
    Aller Sturm nimmt nichts, weil dein Wurzelgriff zu stark ist
    und endet meine Frist, weiss ich dass du noch da bist
    Gefürchtet von der Zeit, mein Baum, mein Stamm in Ewigkeit

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Where? Hardly to USA....
    They could do a hell of a lot worse.

    Contrary to mainstream misrepresentation, there are still a lot of decent white Americans resisting the influx of muds, and the indoctrination of cultural Marxism.
    Aside from an ever increasing number of mortals who have willfully chosen to worship Satan and his minions, our battle has always been against the powers and principalities operating surreptitiously throughout this twisted world.

  3. #13
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    Possibilities what may follow, from thelocal.se:

    Sweden faces uncertainty after dead-heat election

    And the winner is... it's complicated

    What happens now? Löfven has not resigned, so prepare for an uncertain period of long and intense negotiations about who will run Sweden in the next four years. It is unlikely that either the left-wing or the right-wing would at this stage willingly allow the other to form a government. It is even more unlikely that the Sweden Democrats, with more than 17 percent of the vote, would make way for the future government without expecting something in return – such as for example senior posts on legislative committees.

    I have already linked to this analysis by political scientist Nicholas Aylott, of Södertörn University, a couple of times tonight, about the various scenarios Sweden could face, but it is helpful to understand how the process of forming a government works in Sweden. It also explains why the country may end up with a coalition that nobody really likes, but everybody tolerates. A new election is only a last resort, and remember that if there is anything the Swedes are good at, it's finding compromises where you think there are none.
    When you play the game of thrones in Sweden you don't win, you form a minority government. Political scientist Nicholas Aylott considers the various scenarios the country might face after the election.

    Sweden faces political uncertainty after the election in twelve days. What sort of government could emerge? For a political scientist, this is a fascinating situation. Among much else, it reminds us that the rules of the political game are vitally important in shaping political outcomes. But they are not the whole story.

    The rise and decline of bloc politics

    Sweden, like most European countries, is a parliamentary democracy. Its voters elect the members of parliament, and they, in turn, choose the head of government, the prime minister.

    If one party has won a majority of the seats in parliament, as often happens in Britain, the leader of that party is the obvious prime ministerial choice. Thanks to the proportional electoral system, only very rarely has any Swedish party won its own majority. In practice, though, the designation of a prime minister has usually been easy. The months of post-election wrangling that we see in Belgian and Dutch parliaments, for instance, have never been needed here. The process has been straightforward in Sweden because parties have grouped themselves in a rather neat and predictable way. This is "bloc politics".

    Traditionally, there have been two Swedish blocs, one on the left, one on the right. (Without much in the way of ethnic or religious division, there was little else to mobilize political parties around.) Indeed, the system increasingly resembled a simple two-party system. In 2004 the four centre-right parties formed the "Alliance for Sweden", which everyone soon just called the Alliance. Then, before the 2010 election, the Social Democrats responded by forming "red-green co-operation".

    Today, though, all that seems a long time ago. In the current campaign, the Alliance parties have failed to produce a joint manifesto. Their joint initiatives have been half-hearted. Meanwhile, the parties in the current coalition government, the Social Democrats and the Greens, no longer even pretend to agree on much.

    Why have the blocs loosened up? The answer is the arrival of an eighth party in parliament, the Sweden Democrats (SD).

    The great disruptors

    Swedish politics has changed. SD – which, according to polls, might win something between 18 and 25 percent of the vote – has both shaped and reflected a new political agenda. Questions about the distribution of wealth and resources, which, like the blocs, can easily be organized on the left-right axis, have been pushed aside in voters' minds by issues related to law and order, ethnic integration and – above all – immigration and asylum-seeking. Crucially, these emotive policy issues split both blocs.

    In 2015-18 the biggest party in each bloc, the Social Democrats and the Moderates, tacitly accepted that lots of voters agreed with SD's hard line on these issues. The two parties adjusted their own policies accordingly. Other parties in their blocs, however, did not. Now it is hard to see how, say, the Moderates and the Centre Party could agree on enough to renew the Alliance. For the same reason, another coalition between the Social Democrats and the Greens is difficult to imagine.

    The Alliance, moreover, is also split by a strategic but closely related question: how to relate, or not relate, to SD. For some in the Alliance, the maintenance of what political scientists call the cordon sanitaire around SD – in other words, a strategy of isolation – is non-negotiable. For others, some sort of accommodation with SD might be conceivable. On this, the "government question", then, the Alliance is fundamentally divided.

    Couldn't the Social Democrats and Moderates just forget their traditional blocs and team up together, in their own "grand coalition"? Perhaps. This has been the solution in Germany in recent years. One Swedish newspaper, Expressen, advocates such an outcome.

    Yet it looks unlikely. For a start, the two old rivals might not win a parliamentary majority between them. The need for additional coalition parties would surely make any deal far more complicated. Anyway, it would be psychologically difficult. After the 2014 election, there was in fact a variant of a grand coalition. The two blocs decided that the smaller one would allow the bigger one to govern. It was known as the December Agreement. It proved too much for many Moderates to stomach.

    Parties avoiding commitment

    So both blocs are split. Neither can win its own majority anyway. Cross-bloc majority combinations look unwieldy and far-fetched. No other party wants to deal with SD. Does that make Sweden ungovernable? Not necessarily. The rules of the game come back into the picture here.

    In establishing which individual has the "confidence" of parliament to lead a government, Sweden uses a so-called negative procedure. Put simply, it gives a potential prime minister a considerable benefit of the doubt. The candidate doesn't have to show that he or she has the support of a majority in parliament. Rather, the candidate has to show merely that there is no majority against his or her candidacy.

    That distinction sounds arcane, but it makes a real difference. It has the effect of letting divided or conflicted parties off the hook.

    Take the Centre Party. It has done well in the polls; it could be Sweden's fourth-biggest party, with about 10 percent of the vote. But it has painted itself into a corner. Its leader, Annie Lööf, says that she wants a centre-right government. But, she insists, the Centre would never sully itself by participating in one that needs the acceptance of SD for its survival.

    Those pledges look hard to reconcile. Because of the parliamentary rules, though, the Centre's leader might yet manage it. Perhaps she could regret, publicly and bitterly, the emergence, again, of a Social Democratic prime minister – while her party, again, tolerates just that outcome, by declining to vote against such a government or its budget. Perhaps she could indeed refuse to take part in a centre-right government that is accepted by SD – while her party holds its nose and itself tolerates just such a government. A centre-right prime minister would probably be a Moderate. But it is conceivable that Lööf herself could assume that mantle – and thus emerge as the prime ministerial candidate whom newly elected Swedish parliamentarians dislike the least.

    Quite possibly, then, Sweden will emerge with a rather extreme form of minority government – one whose only party has attained just a quarter or even a tenth of the seats in parliament. That is a recipe for slow, painstaking legislative negotiations on everything. It might not be what Sweden really needs. But it is not a recipe for chaos. In parliamentary politics, especially in Sweden, it may be better to be tolerated than liked.

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by velvet View Post
    Election observer from Denmark:

    "Under alla valobservationer jag har varit på har jag aldrig sett ett val så odemokratiskt som det svenska. Det är långt ifrån europeisk standard"
    https://nyadagbladet.se/inrikes/valo...som-i-sverige/

    So there's already a systemic problem, plus that the left manipulates it further...
    Yeah, I thought it was a bit odd, as well. When I went to the voting venue (a small elementary school in the case for my location), I was let into a small corridor where the ballots for all the different parties was set up. However, there were several other people there, waiting to be let into the room for the ballot box, who could easily see which party's ballot I was selecting. Not a big problem for me, but I think a lot of people who are more anxious, and more frightened of "what the neighbors may think", would give it more of a second thought.

    After I had picked my party ballots, however, I was let into a closed and private space where I could put the ballots into envelopes, which later went into the ballot box. Made no sense to me, and went completely against the procedure I have experienced in Norway.

    Still, I doubt it had as massive effect on the election as I would have liked to think. SD polling around 25% for years prior the election, and ending up just a bit short of 18%, can be blamed on little else than the stupidity of the Swedish population.
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gareth Lee Hunter View Post
    To accomplish what?
    You don't just give up on the country your ancestors have sweat, bled and died for, for several thousand years, without a fight. I won't go further into it in writing than that.
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

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    Senior Member velvet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Žoreišar View Post
    Yeah, I thought it was a bit odd, as well. When I went to the voting venue (a small elementary school in the case for my location), I was let into a small corridor where the ballots for all the different parties was set up.

    Still, I doubt it had as massive effect on the election as I would have liked to think. SD polling around 25% for years prior the election, and ending up just a bit short of 18%, can be blamed on little else than the stupidity of the Swedish population.
    On AfS's twitter account you can see photos of several voting venues where the ballots for SD and AfS were stored under the table and not in the boxes on top, in at least one location the ballots for boths parties allegedly were gone completely. That, imho, amounts to election fraud, hope that gets investigated.

    Tbh, I find the system itself rather weird with like 10+ parties each having their own ballot paper (I understand that there are also the direct seats elected so it's more complex, but still weird). There is basically no way to re-control the votes if necessary, ballots can be simply replaced by whatever the counting people want them to be.

    "Others" only got like 1,5% the last I saw, so I also dont think AfS took a lot of votes away from SD, that they came out so low is indeed very disappointing. In Germany AfD is about the same % opposition, and they make life for the mainstream very uncomfortable with lots of inconvenient questions in parliament, so let's hope SD does the same at least for Sweden, pulling out into the public all the stuff the the other parties rather want to wipe under the carpet.
    Ein Leben ist nichts, deine Sprosse sind alles
    Aller Sturm nimmt nichts, weil dein Wurzelgriff zu stark ist
    und endet meine Frist, weiss ich dass du noch da bist
    Gefürchtet von der Zeit, mein Baum, mein Stamm in Ewigkeit

    my signature

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  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Žoreišar View Post
    You don't just give up on the country your ancestors have sweat, bled and died for, for several thousand years, without a fight. I won't go further into it in writing than that.
    LOL. Even if I'm small girl, I think exactly the same way. I admit, I don't feel fully Swedish (no matter I'm also Sweden's citizen), but I care about Sweden and my relatives and friends there. This was my first election and just 7 months now and same election in Finland .

    My mother's ancestors Finnish Swedes (women) belonged to these in the 1930's.


    I belong to these:


    I might join to some voluntary women organization in Sweden as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aelfgar View Post
    I doubt any nationalist party in Europe will ever get more than 25% of the votes. But like I said above, the SD, AfD, etc. will still have influence.
    I'm wrong, some of them have already gained more than 25%, but it depends what we mean by 'nationalist' . . .

    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/10ECE/production/_103362396_eu_far_right_10_09_18_640map-nc.png



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    For the "privacy" at Swedish elections I have read ,
    that some people take other voting cards from other parties additionally
    with them into the cavern , where they put the card in he envelope.

    So just fetch several additionally and leave them in the cabin afterwards .


    In that way one might fetch a second more of the desired party ,
    and leave that on top of the staple, so the next person might get
    the opportunity to change their minds spontaneously.
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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    Swedish Election 2018: Results and Reactions From a Nationalist Perspective



    On Sunday 9th September, the people of Sweden went to the polls in order to elect a new government in a highly anticipated election for people across the political spectrum. The establishment and alternative media have gone head to head for the past few weeks. While the elite alarmed with stories of “fake news” and “Neo Nazis”, they also greatly downplayed the effects that mass immigration has had on Sweden in recent years. Alternative news sites, on the other hand, did our best to counter this, creating article, after meme, after podcast, after video; in a bid to convince the people of Sweden that it’s time to start putting themselves first. All of this was done while keeping one eye on the prize: that magical, yet elusive, 4% for the newly formed Alternativ för Sverige.

    Conversations that were had backstage before votes were cast did not paint a picture of optimism. The AfS are too new to make any ground, it was said, and the Sweden Democrats, who have a chance to do well, will not do anything to tackle Sweden’s demographic issues. It is widely accepted amongst nationalist circles that The Great Replacement cannot be reversed at at the ballot box, but nonetheless, we held out, hoping that we would win a new voice in parliament, and looking for a sign from the people of Sweden that they too had had enough.

    The mainstream media, over in Britain at least, are running with reports that the “far right” have made huge gains. Commentators from the right are also celebrating on social media, advertising that Sweden is beginning to reach out towards a party with anti-immigration sentiments. In actual fact, the Sweden Democrats have increased their share of the vote from 12.9% in 2014, to just under 18% this time around; an increase of around 5%. We will have to wait and see how many votes the AfS received.

    The native percentage of your population dropping below 70%, facing being a minority within your own country within 2 decades, accepting 600,000 “refugees” in the last 5 years, an increase from 55 to 61 “vulnerable areas” in the space of 12 months, 5 terror-related murders and numerous injuries, the rise in overall crime, rape (92% of violent rapes being carried out by people with a migrant background and 43% of all rapes in Sweden being carried out on children) and terrorism leads, the returning ISIS fighters, the lost asylum seekers, over a quarter of the population feeling unsafe while being out at night (38% of people in “vulnerable areas”) and the economic cost of all this for the Swedes results in an increase in votes towards nationalistic parties of a mere 5%, it would seem.

    Sweden… What are you thinking? How can anybody, let alone your men, vote for more of this? But then, how can I judge? I am in Britain and our biggest “right wing” party are UKIP who are currently polling at around 5%. We don’t even have an equivalent to the AfS. And we have up to 1 million girls in our country who have suffered abuse at the hands of Pakistani Muslim men. It is easy to become frustrated when there is a clear solution in sight yet your own people are refusing to reach for it. However, sulking, giving up and sharing nothing but admittance of your own impending sense of doom contributes nothing.

    The Sweden Democrats may have only received 1 in 5-6 votes, but amongst actual Swedish people that figure is much higher. We will have to wait for the full results to come in but we can make an educated guess that most of those who voted for the Sweden Democrats will have been native Swedes and not those with a migratory background. If native Swedes currently make up around 70% of the population, that 18% figure increases to over 25% when we assess the votes this way.

    Let’s also remember that migrants from Africa and a lot of Asia are more likely to vote for left leaning parties when they are in a host country. In Britain for example, 85% of Muslims voted for Labour at our last General Election. For Sweden’s native population to drop, and their non-native population to rise, for the Sweden Democrats to make gains, this is definitely worth a small celebration.

    The AfS, who weren’t officially launched until March this year, have had a huge impact on nationalists across Sweden in the few months since their official formation. We can only expect to hear more from them in the coming years. Though not quite at the level of the Sweden Democrats, they have received great publicity on alternative news sites in recent months and this will only be amplified as we move forward. It is their job, and subsequently our job, to shift public opinion and get people on side.

    A poll was done in Sweden a few months ago which revealed that 60% of voters want fewer refugees. This figure is up from 36% in 2015, before Europe’s migrant crisis was at its peak. This of course begs the question why the Swedes aren’t voting in favour of anti-immigration parties, especially seeing as though they voted immigration and terrorism as their two most pressing issues in a poll carried out the following month.

    At least this gives us something to work with and something to analyse going forward. Our friends over at Red Ice carried out a live stream last night as the results rolled in. Their Swedish guest Marcus Follin, also known as ‘The Golden One’, explained that Swedes have a desire to be the best, or the top of their game, in whatever they do. Could it be that in their desire to be the most tolerant and inclusive nation on the planet that the Swedes are putting the needs of others before their own? If so, at what point will they say enough is enough, and how can we help their everyday citizens realise that this is a fight for survival?



    Against all odds, and against a well-oiled and highly funded establishment, nationalism is certainly rising across Europe. Marine Le Pen came second in the French Presidential Election. In Germany, the AfD entered parliament as the third-largest party. This year, it hasn’t been uncommon to see the AfD polling in second place. A conservative-led government returned to power in Norway. “Populist leader and Foe of Migrants“, Molis Zemen, was re-elected in the Czech Republic. Our parties took power in Italy, returned to power in Hungary, and polled strongly in Slovenia and the Netherlands. We’re also making progress in Sweden and Britain, no matter how frustrated the speed may make us.

    What happened in Sweden yesterday is only just the beginning. Share your frustrations in private, celebrate the small wins, and let’s continue doing what we have been: shifting public opinion and growing nationalism across the continent.
    https://www.defendevropa.org/2018/th...lts-reactions/

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