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Thread: Which Germanic Countries Have the Closest International Relationship?

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    Which Germanic Countries Have the Closest International Relationship?

    In term of politics, culture, people, foreign relations?

    I'd say the US and the UK.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...ates_relations

    They are sometimes called "the special relationship":

    The Special Relationship is an unofficial term often used to describe the political, diplomatic, cultural, economic, military, and historical relations between the United Kingdom and the United States. The term first came into popular usage after it was used in a 1946 speech by Winston Churchill. The two nations have been close allies during many conflicts in the 20th and 21st centuries, including World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Cold War, the Gulf War, and the War on Terror.

    Although both governments also have close relationships with many other nations, the level of cooperation between the UK and the U.S. in trade and commerce, military planning, execution of military operations, nuclear weapons technology, and intelligence sharing has been described as "unparalleled" among major world powers.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Relationship

    Also mentionable US and Canada because of shared history, language, culture, value, borders, both part of the Anglosphere. Canada is the only country whose citizens do not need a visa or travel authorization to visit the US. I've heard that in America, a Canadian wouldn't be considered a foreigner.

    Australia and New Zealand, also very similar countries, most about US and Canada applies, good neighbourhood.

    in Europe, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Norway's national anthem references the standing with their three brothers. Although the status and independence of these countries changed, they were at war with each other, today they are still brother peoples, a remarkable and uplifting example how similarities trump politics. They have closely related and mutually intelligible languages. Denmark and Sweden are now connected with a bridge and quite a few people commute back and forth between these countries.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sól View Post
    In term of politics, culture, people, foreign relations?

    I'd say the US and the UK.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...ates_relations

    They are sometimes called "the special relationship":



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Relationship

    Also mentionable US and Canada because of shared history, language, culture, value, borders, both part of the Anglosphere. Canada is the only country whose citizens do not need a visa or travel authorization to visit the US. I've heard that in America, a Canadian wouldn't be considered a foreigner.

    Australia and New Zealand, also very similar countries, most about US and Canada applies, good neighbourhood.

    in Europe, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Norway's national anthem references the standing with their three brothers. Although the status and independence of these countries changed, they were at war with each other, today they are still brother peoples, a remarkable and uplifting example how similarities trump politics. They have closely related and mutually intelligible languages. Denmark and Sweden are now connected with a bridge and quite a few people commute back and forth between these countries.
    The 'special relationship' which you refer to is a mere myth used by the elite to maintain the post war subservience of the United Kingdom to the United States. It has no other meaning or purpose.

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