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Thread: Viking Burial Site Found in England

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    Account Inactive nemo's Avatar
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    Post Viking Burial Site Found in England

    Find of a Lifetime Unearthed in England

    They're calling it the "find of a lifetime." Archaeologists have uncovered the burial site of six Viking men and women--complete with swords, spears, jewelry, fire-making materials, and riding equipment, reports The Associated Press.

    See photos of the Viking burial site that is believed to date to the 10th century.

    Discovered in northwestern England near Cumwhitton, the site is thought to date to the early 10th century. It is the first Viking burial ground found in Great Britain. (A Viking grave was excavated in the 1940s, but the bodies had been cremated and not buried.) The Vikings lived in Scandinavia from 800 to 1100, but conducted legitimate business trade, as well as raided, much of Europe. The Vikings invaded and conquered England in 1013.

    Here's an amazing archaeological find--a nude painting like none ever seen before!

    The find was made at the end of March by Peter Adams, a metal specialist in Cumwhitton, England, who used a metal detector to find two copper brooches. He then found the grave of the Viking woman and further excavation led to the other graves. Adams reported his find to the Portable Antiquities Scheme, which is run by the Museums, Libraries, and Archive Council, and the discovery was announced to the public on Monday. "This is tremendous news, a unique discovery which will improve people's understanding of the area and its history," council chairman Mark Wood told AP.

    This is a mystery: Inexplicable rock carvings have been found hewn into one, isolated sandstone boulder in northern England. The experts have no idea what they are or who made them.

    Adams described it as "the find of a lifetime." Rachel Newman, of Oxford Archaeology North, echoed his sentiments, telling AP, "We could not have expected more from the excavation of the site. We knew the brooches found by Mr. Adams came from a burial of a Viking Age woman, which was exciting and of great importance in itself. But we did not expect to find five other graves complete with such a splendid array of artifacts. It truly has been an amazing few months excavating this extremely important Viking Age site." Among the many items found in the graves were weapons, spurs, a bridle, and a drinking horn, as well as a jet bracelet and a copper alloy belt fitting.

    The remnants of two Stone Age settlements were recently found off the coast of Great Britain. The story of how they were found is as interesting as what was found!

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    Post Re: Viking grave found in England

    Photos of the Viking buriel site dating back to the 10th century.

    http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/news/pho...&x=13&y=8&floc

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    You are not wrong, who deem / That my days have been a dream Johannes de León's Avatar
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    Post Viking burial site found in England

    Archaeologists in northwestern England have found a burial site of six Viking men and women, complete with swords, spears, jewelry, fire-making materials and riding equipment, officials said Monday. The site, discovered near Cumwhitton, is believed to date to the early 10th century, and archaeologists working there called it the first Viking burial ground found in Britain.

    The only other known Viking cemetery was found in Ingleby east of Cumwhitton. It was excavated in the 1940s, but the bodies had been cremated and not buried.

    Local metal specialist Peter Adams made the find at the end of March and reported it to the Portable Antiquities Scheme, which is run by the Museums, Libraries and Archive Council.

    "This is tremendous news, a unique discovery which will improve people's understanding of the area and its history," council chairman Mark Wood said.

    The Vikings, inhabitants of Scandinavia from 800 to 1100, traded with, and raided, much of Europe, often settling there. They invaded and conquered England in 1013.

    The burial ground was unearthed when Adams found two copper brooches. The grave of a Viking woman was found underneath, and further excavation led to the discovery of the graves of another woman and four men.

    Among the items found in the graves were weapons, spurs, a bridle and a drinking horn, as well as a jet bracelet and a copper alloy belt fitting.

    Adams described it as "the find of a lifetime."

    Rachel Newman, of Oxford Archaeology North, said: "We could not have expected more from the excavation of the site.

    "We knew the brooches found by Mr. Adams came from a burial of a Viking Age woman, which was exciting and of great importance in itself. But we did not expect to find five other graves complete with such a splendid array of artifacts. It truly has been an amazing few months excavating this extremely important Viking Age site."

    Arts Minister Estelle Morris said: "We should all be grateful to Mr. Adams, who recorded his find so promptly. As a result, the experts have been able to learn more about this fascinating site and uncover the secrets of a time capsule more than 1,000 years old."

    Some of the items found were to be shown Tuesday at the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery in the nearby city of Carlisle.


    [ Source ]
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    Post Re: Viking burial site found in England

    Nice to see folks paying attention to oft ignored facts...Thank you for posting Johannes de León!

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    Post Re: Viking burial site found in England

    This is a very interesting find

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    Lightbulb More Info. :)

    Excellent thread, Johannes de León!, thanks for posting it! I've attached below some more info. on this topic, again, from the American tabloid newspaper (believe it or not) Sun (11 Oct. 2004, p. 38). The highlighted parts are by me with these are some of those points (with my comments in brackets) presented here:
    1. "They also lived in a highly structured society (in classic Teutonic, militaristic, style) and believed in family values (indeed, which debunks the notion of Vikings being men-only 'pirates' raiding the high-seas and coastlines) and equality of the sexes. (in the senses of women being treated better {by the standards of the day}, held in higher regard, allowed to inherit real property, etc.)"
    2. "...outskirts of Cumwhitton, England ("Viking England" was NO fantasy, period)..."
    3. "The female remains are elaborately decorated with beads, bracelets and rings, suggesting that they were probably the men's wives or mothers (Viking men looked out for their women, no doubt about it)."
    4. "The graves, which date to the early 900s, also help pinpoint approximately when the Vikings abandonded their pagan beliefs for Christianity (at least by this time, Vikings in England were, to certain degrees, Christianizing)...But the artifacts indicate they hadn't completely forsaken their old beliefs (at least beyond this time Vikings in England were still retaining certain 'Heathen' beliefs/views)."
    Question: would any of you happen to know just WHO controlled the area around Cumwhitton at the time these Vikings lived?! Cumwhitton lies within Cumbria/Cumberland...was this area ever under The Danelaw (at least as of 878 it wasn't)?...was this area controlled by Angles at that time?...or was this area controlled by what remained of the old "British" tribes of those days? I'm curious about this...it may just be, that these Vikings were very much out of their territory in the 'England' of that day.

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    Post Re: Viking burial site found in England

    The Site


    medieval key


    Brooch from grave


    spurs found in grave


    A male burial with sword


    bracelet


    source
    Last edited by Newgrange; Monday, October 11th, 2004 at 01:54 AM.

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