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Thread: Brexit

  1. #551
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    Brexit


















  2. #552
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    PM Johnson ‘rules out’ pact with Farage, saying it would only benefit Corbyn



    A ‘Leave alliance’ between the Tories and the Brexit Party is not happening, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said. Nigel Farage proposed the pact, saying it would produce an ‘unstoppable force’ hell bent on leaving the EU.



    In an interview with Sky News’ Sophy Ridge, that is to be aired on Sunday, the prime minister said the Conservative Party is not interested in allying itself with anyone for the snap parliamentary election, regardless of how close their goals may be to those of the Tories.


    “I've ruled out a pact with everybody because I don't think it's sensible to do that,” he said.


    Alas, the only likely consequence of voting for them rather than for us… is that you are making it more likely that you would thereby get Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party and a chaotic constellation of other parties... with nothing but dither and delay.”


    Johnson’s election strategy, according to the Times, is to capture the center votes by dropping his earlier threat to implement a no-deal Brexit, which was what he did before the October 31 deadline for leaving the EU was postponed. Farage criticized the approach, tweeting that if the PM succeeds “we will never be free of EU rules.”



    Farage on Friday suggested that an alliance between the Conservatives and the Brexit Party and possibly others would deliver a decisive majority to Johnson, securing parliamentary approval for finally leaving the European Union.



    Johnson called an early election on December 12 after his attempts to get his Brexit plan through Parliament failed.



    Farage set a November 14 deadline for the PM to consider his offer.



    Nigel is right and has been from the beginning.



    I thought he snuffed it in the ditch.


    BoJo wants to split the Brexit vote to enable Brussels victory. I say no more lest I'm accused of a hate crime.



    PM Johnson ‘rules out’ pact with Farage, saying it would only benefit Corbyn03 XI 2019.


    Boris is really a ‘REMAINER’ wanting a remain deal.

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    Farage Will Not Stand as MP, Will ‘Serve the Cause’ Supporting Brexit Party Candidates



    Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage revealed he would not be standing as a Parliamentary candidate in December’s snap election. Instead, he will be devoting his time to “serve the cause” by supporting his party nominees across Great Britain.



    Speaking on The Andrew Marr Show on Sunday morning, the veteran Brexit campaigner Farage said that he would begin campaigning on behalf of his political colleagues on Monday.



    Mr Farage said that he had contemplated how best to “serve the cause of Brexit”: whether by seeking a parliament seat or “traversing the length and breadth of the United Kingdom, supporting 600 candidates. And I’ve decided the latter course is the right one.” “I don’t want to be in politics for the rest of my life,” he told the BBC host.


    He said that he wanted to explain to the people that what Prime Minister Boris Johnson is selling — his EU-approved withdrawal treaty — “is not Brexit”, but rather a “Remainer’s Brexit”.

    They need to understand that actually what’s on offer is a close linkage to all the European institutions. The next negotiating phase is of at least three years. So I’m going out across the country, starting tomorrow,” the Brexit Party MEP said.



    Mr Farage launched his election campaign on Friday, softening his clean-break Brexit stance and again offering an alliance with the Conservative Party. Asked whether there had been any progress in those talks, Mr Farage said that “conversations have happened over the previous few weeks, but if Boris is determined to stick to this new EU treaty then that is not Brexit”. “If Boris was going for a genuine Brexit, we wouldn’t need to fight against him in this election,” he added.



    Show host Andrew Marr asked the Brexiteer whether running in 600 seats across England, Wales, and Scotland could split the Leave vote and hand Jeremy Corbyn’s anti-Brexit Labour Party a victory. Mr Farage raised a similar scenario from 2015 when he was UKIP leader and running his party against David Cameron’s Conservatives and Ed Miliband’s Labour Party.


    I’ve heard all this before,” Mr Farage said. “I sat here talking to you in 2015 when you asked me would the UKIP involvement mean that Mr Miliband would become prime minister? And what happened on results night? We saw the four million UKIP votes hurt the Labour Party more than it hurt the Conservative Party. It may very well be the same this time around.” “David Cameron would not have got a majority without the UKIP vote,” he added.



    Mr Farage highlighted that Brexit was not a right-wing issue and that his party would be picking up left-wing voters in the Labour heartlands. “We’re looking at Brexiteers through this centre-right conservative prism, completely forgetting the five million people who voted Brexit [in 2016] and then voted for Jeremy Corbyn in 2017… Those people from those communities are more likely to vote Brexit Party than they are to vote Conservative,” he said.





    We can’t trust the conservatives, never have been able too...
    This group of politicians working under that banner aren’t even right wingers or centrists they are left wing globalists:
    Continuation of the UN migration compact
    No roll back on the man made climate scam
    Open borders
    Mass migration
    Continuing the exclusive special status right of LGBTQ at everyone else’s detriment
    Increased hyper-sexuality being encouraged in the schools (all left wing Marxist ideologues)
    Don’t trust the “conservatives”...
    How many times do they have to lie and con you all before you say enough is enough







    Farage Will Not Stand as MP, Will ‘Serve the Cause’ Supporting Brexit Party Candidates

    03 XI 2019.



    Brexit can only honestly happen if we leave with a clean break. That is NO DEAL.

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    Four nations, 650 seats and one elephant in the room: What to expect from the UK election?


    WHAT CAN WE expect from the UK election?




    The latest poll from YouGov puts the Conservatives on 36%, Labour on 21%, the Lib Dems on 18, the Brexit Party on 13% and the Greens on 6%. Other candidates are on 6%. But let’s not rely too heavily on polls – almost anything could happen in this election.


    Boris Johnson is in the role as Prime Minister based on his ability to win voters over with his lovable-rogue style of politics and bizarre speeches; and Jeremy Corbyn finally has the election he’s been calling for, and another chance to prove the pollsters wrong – as well as some sections of the British media.


    Meanwhile, the Lib Dems’ Jo Swinson is targeting the 16 million people who voted to remain in the EU as her potential electoral base; and former Ukipper Nigel Farage is heading up his new Brexit Party into its first general election, having won 35% of votes in the European election.


    In Northern Ireland, the DUP will battle to keep their 10 MP seats and Sinn Féin will be defending their abstention policy to the media again, while the UUP and SDLP will look to gain some ground without splitting the unionist or nationalist vote.


    Any one political move could change the outcome dramatically, including a ‘Leave’ pact between Johnson and Farage, or a ‘Remain’ pact between the Lib Dems and SNP. Here’s a more in-depth look at England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.



    Scotland



    Don’t mention the court case

    When the choice was between a general election before or after Christmas, the dominant Scottish National Party (SNP) would have preferred one before the end of January – before its prominent former leader and First Minister of Scotland Alex Salmond goes on trial charged with multiple counts of attempted rape and sexual assault. That will play to its favour, as will a few other factors.


    Ruth Davidson, the Tories hugely popular Scottish leader, resigned from her role earlier this year. She said this was because of family commitments (she gave birth to her son earlier this year) but also cited qualms over the Tories’ handling of Brexit. In her address to journalists, she asked MPs to get on with it and vote for a Brexit deal.


    Labour, meanwhile, have had historic problems in Scotland because of the strength of the SNP, and as Scotland voted to Remain in the EU, the party’s wishy-washy stance on what it wants from the 2016 EU referendum result won’t help them one bit. But:
    The enthusiasm of Scottish Labour to campaign is palpable,” Jeremy Corbyn told the House of Commons on Tuesday. Let’s wait and see.



    Current make-up of the parties


    The SNP has 35 MPs, winning the majority of Scotland’s 59 seats in Westminster. It won 3 MEP seats in the European election, which represents half of Scotland’s total. As a result, the SNP is Scotland’s largest political party (in terms of seats in Westminster and the Scottish Parliament on Holyrood).



    What do the polls say?


    A YouGov poll from September this year puts the SNP on 43%, while a Panelbase poll from 11 October had them at 39%. In Scotland the Tories are on 20/21% in those same polls respectively, while Labour is on 15% - 19%. The Liberal Democrats are on 12% - 13%, while the Brexit Party is on 6% - 5% in Scotland, in what will be its first general election outing. There are a lot of tight-votes and bitter fights ahead of us in Scotland. In the current seats held, a dozen of the 59 seats were won my a majority of under 1% of the vote. In North East Fife, the SNP’s Stephen Gethins won a majority of just two.


    What to look out for


    Two tense battles are brewing in Glasgow – in the North East, Labour’s Paul Sweeney won back a seat from the SNP’s seven seats with a majority of just 242, and has since been made Labour’s Shadow Under-Secretary of State for Scotland. Whether he keeps his seat or not will tell us a lot.


    Glasgow East is another traditional Labour stronghold, and Natalie McGarry won the seat in 2015 – only to resign the whip and later be convicted of fraud, which she is appealing. David Linden replaced her in the by-election and won the seat by just 75 votes.


    In Stirling, the Conservative candidate Stephen Kerr took a seat over the SNP by just 148 votes – things will be trickier this time for him. There have also been rumours that the prominent and Twitter-friendly SNP MEP Alyn Smith would contest the seat…


    And finally, Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath will be a key area for the SNP to win back. An area where former Prime Minister Gordon Brown ran, it was won by Labour’s current Shadow Scottish Secretary Lesley Laird over the SNP’s Roger Mullin by 259 votes.



    England and Wales




    Last time out


    The last UK election in 2017 saw a clear return to two-party politics across England and Wales. This time around, it’s already seemingly clear that this virtual duopoly on voter share is set to be eaten into next month. The question will be by how much and what effect it will have.


    Whereas Ukip had carved a niche for itself in the 2015 election and the Liberal Democrats entered government after a strong 2010, Theresa May’s snap election in 2017 was a two-horse race. Ukip’s collapse after the departure of Nigel Farage allowed Labour and the Conservatives to hoover up a combined 87% of the vote in England in 2017, taking all but 10 of the 523 English seats on offer.


    The Conservatives won 296 seats to Labour’s 227.


    In Wales, Labour won 28 of the 40 seats after a huge surge in its support that saw it win a mighty 70% of the vote. Welsh independence party Plaid Cymru won four seats, half of the Conservatives eight.



    Two, three, four party system?


    If it’s a case of the major parties being brought back down to earth, it remains to be seen what sort of a landing they’ll get.


    Farage is back and he’s at the helm of the slicker and more disciplined Brexit Party, targeting seats where the two major parties could be weak. The Tories had hoped that Brexit would be a reality by the time that UK voted again, stymying the appeal of the Farage’s shiny new vehicle, but this has not happened. It means that Farage has been attempting to talk up the idea of a Leave alliance. Even drafting in US President Donald Trump to try and get it off the ground.


    But it’s not just Johnson that Farage could prove troublesome for.


    The Brexit Party stealing votes from otherwise Labour-leaning voters in Leave voting constituencies might scupper Jeremy Corbyn’s chances of winning the marginal seats he needs to form a government. Labour faces the prospect of bleeding votes on two fronts, with the Liberal Democrats aggressively targeting Labour Remain voters with its vociferously anti-Brexit message and a promise to revoke Article 50. The Lib Dems have also been stealing Tory MPs and bringing them under the own banner (five at the latest count this year by Sky News), demonstrating how the dominance of both parties of both parties has been eroded. Labour activists have been bleating about a LibDem message which argues that it’s a smarter tactical vote to vote for them in some constituencies. But how much all this plays out on election night is the real question.



    Put up or shut up



    Johnson was comfortably elected as Conservative leader in July on a “do or die” platform of delivering Brexit. For many of those who voted for him though, the real reason for putting him in charge was the belief that he could be a populist vote-getter come election time. Johnson himself seemed be in campaign mode from the start too, promising new rail links in northern England and Scotland within days of taking over.


    Now that the election has come (at the fourth time of asking) there is huge pressure on him to deliver the decisive victory Theresa May could not. Should he fail to do so his future would already be brought into question.


    Ditto for Corbyn, but for different reasons.


    Including nationwide local elections, the last general election and the recent European elections, Corbyn will be fighting his fifth election as Labour leader. The previous general election didn’t bring the party into government but was seen as a qualified success after Labour increased its vote share and won more seats. It was built on the back of Corbyn’s campaigning and the subsequent Corbynmania united a fractured party for a period. The problem now is that all that seems like a distant memory and questions lurk about whether that performance represents a high watermark for what Corbyn can achieve with Labour.


    A failure for him to become prime minister this time would likely mean his final chance had come and gone.



    Northern Ireland



    All eyes on the DUP


    After a tumultuous Assembly election in March 2017, in which Sinn Féin made major gains, all eyes were on Arlene Foster to prove that the Democratic Unionist Party was still capable of remaining as the most powerful electoral force when Theresa May announced a general election in June. The result of that election left the DUP shaping the direction of British politics. And while the party is still smarting from Johnson’s decision to ignore the party’s concerns over his Brexit deal, the DUP still retains key influence in deciding which bills and motions survive their journey through a divided House of Commons. For that reason, expect more attention on the complex, contentious politics of Northern Ireland than ever before as the DUP faces a nearly unprecedented challenge in holding all of its 10 MPs.



    Current make-up of the parties


    The DUP has 10 MPs, Sinn Féin has seven – though they don’t take their seats in the House of Commons. Both the SDLP and the Ulster Unionists had historically bad nights in 2017, ending up with no representation at Westminster. The only other MP from Northern Ireland is Independent unionist Lady Sylvia Hermon, who has spent recent days berating Johnson’s deal in parliament.



    What to look out for:


    Belfast South: A key battleground, it was won in 2017 by the DUP in a surprise victory for Emma Little Pengelly and represented a major defeat for the SDLP. This time around, the SDLP candidate Claire Hanna will be hoping to wrench the seat back with a passionate anti-Brexit message, while the Alliance Party – which has enjoyed a remarkable few months after success at the European elections – will also have hopes of making a strong showing in the constituency.



    Belfast North: DUP deputy leader Nigel Dodds faced a serious challenge from Sinn Féin at the last election, defeating John Finucane by only 2,000 votes – a victory aided by the Ulster Unionist Party standing aside in the constituency. This time, things could be different. The incoming Ulster Unionist Party leader Steve Aiken has said that that arrangement won’t happen again, creating a very difficult path to re-election for Dodds. It’s a move that triggered serious criticism in the unionist community, with growing pressure on Aiken to row back – so the odds may yet end up being back in Dodds’ favour.



    Alliance momentum: The Alliance Party has had a run of good form, with leader Naomi Long winning the third seat in the European Parliament election and strong returns from the local elections in May. But these successes may be cut short by a first–past-the-post electoral system, which makes it difficult for smaller parties to make inroads. Even if the party doesn’t win any seats, however, watch out for how many votes it gets – if it enjoys something of a minor surge it could be a good indication of a changing electoral landscape in the North.



    SDLP and UUP: Both parties will need to make gains to allay doubts about their long-term viability after a series of poor election results. The SDLP stands a good chance in Belfast South, but even then the pressure is on leader Colum Eastwood to deliver a good night for the party.






    Journal.ie Four nations, 650 seats and one elephant in the room: What to expect from the UK election?

    05 XI 2019.

    The issue of postal votes has not been addressed. Where the election is close it will be huge.

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    Brexit stances of the main British parties?


    THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION and its leaders granted the UK an extension to Article 50 which triggers its withdrawal from the EU in order to allow the UK to hold an election.


    Despite the new Brexit deadline having been pushed back to 31 January, the issue has not gone away. Whatever the political make-up of the House of Commons is on 13 December, that will decide the next course of Brexit. A change of Tory leader was once thought to bring enough change to get some form of Brexit divorce deal through the fractured House of Commons – but that hasn’t worked. So here we are, in the midst of a winter election: but how will a new government, and a new House of Commons, change Brexit? Here are the options…


    The Conservatives

    The detail of the Conservatives’ Brexit policy has been in flux (remember Tory PM David Cameron campaigned for Remain), but now they stand for Brexit, and one that involves leaving the Customs Union and Single Market as Theresa May announced in 2017. If Boris Johnson delivers on his pledge to storm home a victorious election result for the Tories, and a 320-strong majority, we have a straightforward path for his Brexit deal. The House of Commons returns on 16 December, so Johnson is likely to “unpause” his 110-page Brexit Withdrawal Agreement legislation, and propose a new schedule for debating and amending it.

    This is where the snag could be: if an amendment is tabled and passed by the House that is in some way incompatible with the Withdrawal Agreement or the EU’s red lines, then we’re back to another British parliamentary stalemate. But, with the possibility that things could all go smoothly in the setting of a fresh House of Commons, a Tory majority could mean that the UK actually does leave on 31 January next year (particularly as it would re-enforce Johnson’s mandate to pass his Brexit divorce deal).


    The Labour Party

    Where to start. The UK’s Labour Party has struggled with what Brexit stance it would take. As the Tories became the party that would deliver Brexit, the natural position for the opposite main British party to take was Remain. But Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has been a long-standing critic of the EU as overly bureaucratic and veering too close to the idea of a European federation. Corbyn has looked weak during bouts of Prime Minister’s Question as a result – criticising the Tories for their record on Brexit, for failing to get a Brexit deal through the House, but not being clear about what he would do instead.


    A bit of clarity came in July this year, when Labour said it would back a second referendum first and foremost, and that in a referendum where the options were the Tories’ Withdrawal Agreement, a no-deal Brexit or remain, Labour would campaign for remain. Corbyn said Labour was the “party of choice” when it came to Brexit.



    At the Labour Party’s party conference in September, the party narrowly rejected a grassroots attempt to force leader Jeremy Corbyn to have Labour campaign outright for Remain, and to reverse the outcome of the 2016 Brexit vote. Instead, Corbyn and Labour’s ruling executive agreed in a secret ballot that Labour would adopt no official Brexit position in its general election campaign. So here we are.


    Corbyn clarified this further this week, when he told Sky News that if in government, he and his party would ask for a fourth Brexit extension from the EU, despite indications from the EU that another extension won’t be granted. I am very clear… [we] will get that extension. He then said that he would “secure a credible deal in three months”, then “put it to the people for the final say, with the option to remain, in six months”.

    As to what kind of Brexit deal Labour would negotiate, according to Corbyn’s most recent comments, free movement of people between the UK and EU would continue, suggesting a closely aligned soft-Brexit. “[Free movement] enriches the lives of all of us,” he said.


    The Lib Dems

    The Liberal Democrats recently became the party of Remain, meaning they will reverse Brexit by unilaterally revoking Brexit if they manage to form a government majority (highly unlikely).

    Its leader Jo Swinson responded to a question on whether this was antidemocratic by saying that the party was open about what it would do when in government, and if successful on 12 December, it would be a new democratic mandate.

    The Lib Dems are expected to pluck some seats away from the Conservatives in pro-Remain areas on this clear mandate.

    Criticising Corbyn’s indecision, Swinson said: “On so many grounds, Jeremy Corbyn is not fit for the job of prime minister. “On the biggest issue of the day, he has prevaricated and will not give a straight answer. Even now if you ask him whether he is Remain or Leave he will not tell you how he would vote.”


    The Brexit Party

    Another straightforward one. The Brexit Party think that the only way to deliver on the Brexit mandate from the 2016 referendum is through a no-deal Brexit.

    Its founder and leader Nigel Farage has asked Johnson to form a pact with him for the election, which would see them team up to win seats, but would mean that Johnson would have to “drop” his Brexit deal. “I urge the Prime Minister to reconsider and drop the deal because it’s not Brexit,” he said in a Brexit Party newsletter. Instead, Farage says that “a simple FTA” should be agreed by 1 July 2020. “That must mean no new EU Treaty. No new negotiations on the impossible basis of Mr Barnier’s Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration. No signing us up to any political linkage to the EU or the authority of EU courts,” he said.


    ‘Regional’ parties & the Greens



    The Scottish National Party has campaigned against Brexit and to remain in the EU, on the basis that the majority of Scotland voted to remain. Scottish National Party leader Nicola Sturgeon has vowed to “escape Brexit” during the launch of her independence-seeking, pro-European party’s British election campaign. “A vote for the SNP… is a vote to escape Brexit,” she said, tying a remain vote to the apparent growing Brexit fatigue.


    Plaid Cymru and the Green party are also ‘remain’ parties, and have agreed a ‘Remain’ election pactwith the Lib Dems across 60 seats in England and Wales in order not to split the anti-Brexit vote.


    The DUP is, of course, a pro Brexit party, and Sinn Féin are a staunchly anti-Brexit party. But both have said that they are against any kind of border in the Irish Sea or on the island of Ireland. The SDLP are against Brexit, the UUP are for it, generally speaking. The Alliance Party are also firmly anti-Brexit, which could do well in this election.


    “If you are a pro-EU unionist, Alliance is your best and possibly only option and I think this has helped the party,” said Dr David Mitchell, an expert in conflict studies in TCD.


    What are the Brexit stances of the main British parties?

    10 XI 2019.

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    Women quitting UK politics


    What started off as a trickle has quickly developed into a steady flow of politicians leaving office ahead of the UK general election. More than 20 women have said they won't be running in next month's election. Many of them are women from across the political spectrum.



    High profile, household names, including former ministers Amber Rudd and Nicky Morgan, are stepping down citing online abuse and threats against them and their families as a major factor in their decision. Joining them are the Liberal Democrats Heidi Allen, Independent Justine Greening and Labour's Gloria De Piero among many others. A growing concern over death and rape threats, and racist abuse, are some of the reasons senior female politicians don't want to return to parliament.


    In her resignation letter, former Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan said: "The clear impact on my family and the other sacrifices involved, and the abuse for, doing the job of a modern MP can only be justified if, ultimately, parliament does what it is supposed to do." Ms Morgan said that the abuse MPs receive has "contributed" to the decision but was not the main deciding factor about why she is stepping down.


    Brexit has been blamed for the toxic political atmosphere, and on the streets MPs have been dealing with an increasingly hostile and weary public who want an end to the political chaos. The exodus of experienced female MPs has been described as "alarming" by groups campaigning for equality in parliament. "It’s tragic that the online abuse is stopping some female candidates from running in the election,"’ said Frances Scott of 50:50 Parliament, a group campaigning for a gender-balanced parliament. "The online threats can be extremely personal and violent in nature," Ms Scott told RTÉ News. "Women have received death threats, threats of rape, there's also been threats made to family, children, close relatives and fathers. It's frightening."


    On a chilly, but sunny afternoon in north London, two female MP candidates gingerly make their way along the Holloway Road. They cautiously approach members of the public, politely inquiring if they have two minutes to chat about the election issues in their constituencies in Islington. The two Green Party candidates prefer to campaign in groups in daylight because it is safer than going out alone on the cold winter nights.


    Deciding when to campaign has become a major factor for female candidates running in the general election because online abuse is making many candidates "fearful and tearful" according to one female MP in parliament. "Our public debate has been so distorted and degraded and I'd be lying if I said I wasn't concerned about being a woman and putting myself forward," said Talia Hussain, a Green Party candidate in Islington South. "We are organising our campaigning around weekends and afternoons so that we can be out in daylight and make sure that we are all in groups. It's something we have to work around unfortunately," Ms Hussain said on the campaign trail.


    A recent study carried out for the Commons' Women and Equalities Committee found that online abuse is putting women off standing for election. Two-thirds of female MPs (65%) said that progress on tackling violence against women in politics - including online abuse - impacted their willingness to stand for re-election, compared to one in four (24%) male MPs. "Evidence shows that women MPs get three times as much abuse as men and it is of a personal nature," according to Ms Scott.


    Rights groups say that the social media giants need to do more to tackle the online trolls. "Facebook and Twitter need to ensure that the posts are not of a violent nature because it is undermining democracy," Ms Scott explained.


    208 female MPs were elected in the last general election setting a new record. The fear is that many of the modest gains made during the last campaign are being undone because of the culture of fear generated by online abuse. "There's a kind of misogynistic undertone from a very few people," said Caroline Russell, a Green Party candidate running against Jeremy Corbyn in the Islington North constituency. "It can be a bit draining when all your mentions on Twitter are full of abusive messages. I don't let myself get drawn into the nastiness and anger," Ms Russell said as she campaigned for votes.


    More than 30% of those leaving parliament ahead of the election are female politicians. "It's really important that women are supported to stand and that parties understand the unique pressures on women," said Ms Russell.


    All the political parties have pledged to stop the online abuse targeting not just women, but also minority ethic and LGBTQ candidates. The aim is to make political life easier so political parties can attract the next generation to replace the long-standing, experienced female MPs deserting the House of Commons.




    RTE: Abuse, threats lead to women quitting UK politics11 XI 2019.




    "Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to hell."


    A good few female MPs are finding the going tough and that has nothing to do with being female. The reason is these women are not representing the voters that elected them. Members of Parliament are in the HoC to serve not rule.


    It happens everywhere if your not doing the job you were hired for you have to go. Its not personal.


    I look forward to the ‘cleanout’.

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    Hillary Clinton: Brexit is a ‘Problem’ of Democracy and UK is ‘On the Path to Fascism’


    Failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has waded into British politics for the second time this week, saying that Brexit is a symptom of ‘problems’ in democracies and that the United Kingdom is ‘on the path to fascism’.




    Speaking at King’s College London, Hillary Clinton chimed in on UK politics again, claiming that female MPs who have quit after receiving online abuse from “hatemongers on the left or right” could lead Britain down an “authoritarian” path.


    “When I heard about all these people, particularly the women, who weren’t going to run again [as MPs], and they attributed it to the threats they are going to face, that is not only a threat to individuals, that is a threat to democracies. If people are intimidated out of running for office in a democracy because of these hatemongers on the left or the right . . . that is the path [to] authoritarianism, that is the path [to] fascism” she said in comments reported by The Times.




    Clinton and her daughter Chelsea, are currently in London promoting their new co-authored book – The Book Of Gutsy Women: Favourite Stories Of Courage And Resilience. The failed presidential candidate has herself long been accused of threatening women, particularly from those women who have made claims of sexual assault against her husband, former president Bill Clinton.



    In 2016, Dolly Kyle, the author of Hillary: The Other Woman, told Breitbart News Daily on SiriusXM Patriot Channel 125, that Hillary Clinton “uses lies, threats, intimidation, violence — whatever it takes to achieve her political ends.”


    She went on to say that Mrs Clinton was a “lying hypocrite” and that she “has attacked every woman Billy’s had any kind of sex with!”


    This is the second time in a week that Clinton has publicly stepped in and commented on British politics. On Tuesday Clinton came under fire for ‘interfering’ in the upcoming general election in the United Kingdom.



    Breitbart News reported that Mrs Clinton took to British airwaves and told BBC Radio 5 Live that she was “dumbfounded” that the Boris Johnson government would not be releasing a report on meddling from the Russian government during the 2016 EU referendum.



    “I’m dumbfounded that this government won’t release the report … because every person who votes in this country deserves to see that report before your election happens,” Clinton said.


    The UK government has said that it needs more time to review the report before releasing it to the public, in order to prevent the release of sensitive national security information.



    Mrs Clinton also said yesterday that the pro-sovereignty Brexit movement was a symptom of “the very real problems and disagreements that our democracies have.”




    Why do all Globalists and Demonrats think that any nation wanting to assert it's sovereignty is Fascist?



    They change words, make up words and change definition of words. Now "fascism" is the desire of the populous to have self rule against the wishes of the ruling elite. One MP even declared populism as a spasm. And another called for "proper" democracy. Meaning I guess that people vote "properly" as we tell them to vote. Yes democracy is a problem for self appointed dictators who hate the people and want to punish them for not loving their servitude.


    There is no freedom or survival without self-rule. Hillary should be on the side of our British brothers, not on the side of their feminist-enabled Muslim conquerors.


    if you do not cry for being white or you have family values and you are a Christian and believe in the sanctity of life. Then you are branded a fascist.


    The UN is leading this ... stuffed full of self appointed dictators pushing the global communist governance! Shut down the UN and disband it!





    Hillary Clinton: Brexit is a ‘Problem’ of Democracy and UK is ‘On the Path to Fascism’

    17 XI 2019.



    “I am going to resign Trump” means she is going to run in 2020. Good news is Trump will be re-elected.

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    Anti-Brexit parties in Northern Ireland strike electoral pact to oust 3 DUP MPs ...


    Anti-Brexit parties in Northern Ireland strike electoral pact to oust key DUP figures




    The DUP is facing a stiff challenge in three key seats after Northern Ireland’s anti-Brexit parties struck an electoral pact that could defeat deputy leader Nigel Dodds.

    On Monday, Sinn Féin announced it had withdrawn candidates from South Belfast and East Belfast, clearing the way for moderate nationalists SDLP and the non-sectarian Alliance to take on the DUP.

    The party has also stood down its candidate in North Down in a bid to keep the incumbent Lady Hermon, an independent unionist, in power.

    In turn, the SDLP have pulled out of North Belfast and thrown their weight behind Sinn Féin candidate John Finucane, who came close to unseating Mr Dodds in the 2017 general election.
    DUP sources...




    In the context of this election in which the U.K. electorate is under unprecedented external attack, your uncritical and irresponsible citation of the views of the anti-democratic Sinn Fein is deeply objectionable.

    The lie being peddled is that Northern Ireland voted Remain and that the DUP does not represent the North.
    (The same lie is peddled that Scotland voted Remain.)

    The truth is that the DUP represents the union of the United Kingdom, whereas Sinn Fein represents Eire’s intention to break up the United Kingdom based on its unfounded claim to Northern Ireland.

    Sinn Fein and the SNP are twin forces actively undermining the future of the United Kingdom.


    Sinn Fein disgracefully operates an actual veto on the Stormont Assembly, thus preventing the democratic government of Northern Ireland.

    The SNP similarly claims a veto over the operation of the U.K. government. There is a noticeably Irish Republican ancestry in the leadership of the SNP.

    I deeply regret that Boris Johnson was jumped into calling a General Election at this time of great uncertainty.

    In my view the U.K. is becoming increasingly ungovernable as a result of the external meddling of the EU filtering through the manoeuvring of the Scottish and Irish nationalist parties.


    The EU is experienced by the U.K. electorate as a hostile agency determined to subjugate the U.K. by hook or by crook.

    That is why the majority of the U.K. electorate voted Brexit to recover the Kingdom’s sovereignty and leave the EU.


    Despite the discreditable branding of the DUP and Brexit as an extreme viewpoint, it is the unexceptionable, commonplace, sensible, majority view of 17.4 million ordinary voters.

    Tactical voting, targeted to undermine the clear mandate to leave the EU, is a most undemocratic development capable of the most catastrophic outcome.



    Telegraph: Anti-Brexit parties in Northern Ireland strike electoral ...

    19 XI 2019.

    There are many Remain Pacts in England too.

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    Labour Unveils Retro Class-War Manifesto: Chain Migration, Voting for Children and Foreigners


    Socialist Jeremy Corbyn unveiled his “radical”, retro class warfare manifesto that pledged: mass renationalisation of utilities, the development of a “humane” immigration system, and plans to extend voting rights to 16-year-olds and foreign nationals.



    Speaking from Birmingham City University on Thursday, the Labour leader set out his plans for massive public spending using 1970s-style class war language, pitting the wealthy “them” against the impoverished “us”.


    Claiming that “bankers, billionaires, and establishment” figures do not want Britons to have the raft of ‘free’ — ultimately taxpayer-funded — programmes by Labour, Corbyn claimed to be on the receiving end of attacks from the “rich and powerful” and that the “billionaire-owned media makes things up about us”.


    “[It is] a manifesto that will bring real change… that the political establishment has blocked for a generation. But you can’t have it. At least, that’s what the most powerful people in Britain and their supporters want you to believe,” he said.


    Pledging to tax the rich, Corbyn promised that under a Labour government, “rail, mail, water, and energy” would be renationalised and come into “public ownership” and promised “the very fastest, full-fibre broadband for free” for everyone in the country.


    He offered more free services by telling students that Labour “will bring back maintenance grants” and will “make life-long education a right”.


    “And yes, we will scrap university tuition fees,” Mr Corbyn said to rapturous applause at the university venue.


    In order to pay for all of this and more, Mr Corbyn announced £82.9 billion in tax rises. The party’s funding document outlines that will include increasing corporation tax, increasing income tax on higher earners, a “new national levy” on second homes, “impos[ing] VAT on private school fees”, and getting rid of the Married Persons Allowance.


    Further to the party voting in September to ban private schools by forcing them into government ownership and seizing their assets, the manifesto said that the Labour Party would “ask the Social Justice Commission to advise on integrating private schools and creating a comprehensive education system”.


    On immigration, the manifestosays that Labour will “establish a humane immigration system”, and, like the Liberal Democrats, will halt the “hostile environment” to illegal immigration.


    “Instead, our system will be built on human rights and aimed at meeting the skills and labour shortages that exist in our economy and public services,” the document continued, explaining that the party will increase the flow of low-skilled labour from outside of the EU by restoring the “overseas domestic workers’ visa”.


    The manifesto implied that freedom of movement from the EU could continue “subject to negotiations” if the UK leaves the bloc under a Labour government, “but we recognise the social and economic benefits that free movement has brought both in terms of EU citizens here and UK citizens abroad – and we will seek to protect those rights”.


    Labour also pledged chain migration of the unskilled for all migrants, writing: “In accordance with our values and domestic laws, we will uphold the right to a family life for British, EU and non-EU residents alike. We will end the deportation of family members of people entitled to be here and end the minimum income requirements which separate families.”


    “Labour rules out a no-deal Brexit,” the manifesto explicitly says and outlines that Corbyn will seek a renegotiated soft Brexit deal with the EU and will put that option against Remain in a second referendum.


    The deal would be based on a “permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union”, “close alignment with the Single Market”, and would align workers’ rights and environmental protection laws with EU standards — a Brexit in name only.


    In the party’s most radical pledge, Labour promises to “oversee the largest extension of the franchise in generations, reducing the voting age to 16, giving full voting rights to all UK residents, making sure everyone who is entitled to vote can do so by introducing a system of automatic voter registration, and abandoning plans to introduce voter ID which has been shown to harm democratic rights”.




    It's a numbers game. Corbin is preparing to use the endless supply of young islamic voters that are being popped out at an industrial scale in our hospitals.
    His communist forebears would be so proud of Corbin and his policies that will kill off democracy once and for all.
    This next 30 years is the final generation of the white man if we dont prevent the commie/ islam alliance
    killing us off.



    postal voting fraud assisted by muslim solicitors is a major reason to make voters carry ID and no postal votes from muslims. 16 muslim MPs are not loyal to queen and country only to a non existent allah



    When I was at university I shared a house with a stoner and his stoner friends. Never I have a witnessed a more complete waste of human potential than that circle of friends. I've never touched the stuff myself, after seeing them I never will.



    cannot believe that they can order weed on FB and have it delivered by a scooterised drug mule faster than a pizza and yet the police nor government is not closing down FaceBook.


    Labour Unveils Retro Class-War Manifesto, Chain Migration, Voting for Children and Foreigners

    22 XI 2019.

    Hardline Marxist Leopard Corbyn can’t change his spots. Not that he could or wants to.

    humane” immigration = Mass 3rd World Invasion / the End Game.

    Buying the Student vote: “will bring back education maintenance grants” “And yes, we will scrap university tuition fees,” - Who brought in the Education fees in the first place? The Labour Party.

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    BREXIT General Election Labour hits the panic button MORE BRIBES


    Labour pledges to 'recompense' Waspi
    (Women Against State Pension Inequality) women and scrap pension age rises.


    A Labour government would compensate women born in the 1950s hit by the rise in state pension age.




    In its 2019 manifesto, the Labour Party pledges to compensate women born in the 1950s for the failure of the government to adequately notify them about changes in the state pension age.


    The manifesto reads: “Under the Tories, 400,000 pensioners have been pushed into poverty and a generation of women born in the 1950s have had their pension age changed without fair notification. “This betrayal left millions of women with no time to make alternative plans – with sometimes devastating personal consequences. “Labour recognises this injustice and will work with these women to design a system of recompense for the losses and insecurity they have suffered.”


    The Pensions Act 1995 increased the state pension age for women, bringing the qualifying age in line with men by 2020. The government then decided to accelerate its plan to increase the state pension age in 2011.The state pension age for women was raised last November to 65 – the same as men – for the first time. It has been steadily rising from 60 since 2011 and in 2020 the age for both sexes will rise to 66.


    Campaign groups such as BackTo60 and Women Against State Pension Inequality (Waspi) argue that many women born in the 1950s were not sufficiently warned of the changes and have suffered financial hardship as a result. Debbie de Spon, a spokesperson for Waspi, welcomed the announcement but said a clear framework on how it would be implemented needed to be developed. She says: “As a campaign, we are calling for a bridging pension to provide an income from age 60 to the new state pension age, combined with compensation for those women affected who have already reached their new state pension age. “We are pleased to see the Labour Party recognise the current hardship and make commitments to resolving it, however, this needs to go further.”


    The Liberal Democrats have also pledged to compensate women born in the 1950s over state pension increases, while the Green Party has proposed the delivery of a Universal Basic Income.


    Pledge to scrap pension age rises



    As part of its manifesto, Labour has also pledged to keep the state pension at 66 and not raise it in the future. After the current state pension age rises to 66 next year it is then due to increase to 67 by 2028 and 68 by 2039. Labour has also promised to maintain the triple lock, guaranteeing new state pension increases by either 2.5%, average wage growth or inflation. However, pension experts have criticised the policies for the impact they would have on taxpayers.


    Tom Selby, senior analyst at AJ Bell, says freezing the state pension age is a “gargantuan promise” from Labour with “enormous ramifications for those affected, society as a whole and long-term government spending”. He says: “It’s also important to remember that planned state pension age increases to 67 and 68 are not just based on the last few years’ data, but decades of life expectancy improvements. "If state pension increases are to be permanently shelved, Labour needs to explain who will pay the extra cost in the long-term.”



    Labour pledges to 'recompense' Waspi women and scrap ...

    26 XI 2019.
    Labour said the payout could amount to an eye-watering £58billion over five years - with individual payments averaging £15,380 running to a maximum of £31,300- if Labour gains power in the election.

    Pension of £175 a week is £9100 for a year, £45,500 for five years and £63,700 for seven years. So it’s not even your money back. 50%?

    First we are give our Welfare System to the Mass of 3rd Worlders and then our countries.

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