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Thread: Brexit

  1. #231
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    "being governed by an even panel of British, Dutch, Swedes and Germans at the EU level"
    Ahnenerbe

    British, Dutch, Swedish and German Conniving European Unionist dictators who, against the wishes of the majority of British voters, claim our territory and seas, make our laws and tell us what to do.

    I don’t expect a continental person to ever understand or have a clue what it is to be an ’islander’. Or the sense of property ownership that islanders have, both collectively and personally.

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  3. #232
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    Well I can't really take you guys seriously since you're all even able to discuss sports games to no end, as it was actually a serious thing.

    If there was no EU bogeyman to whine about, the British pub crowd would find something else to whine and moan about. That's just the way it is.

    The City Jews own the country for many centuries now, and the aristocracy has completely merged with Jewry. So the "ownership feeling" is a fantasy anyway. But indeed, I noticed there is this strong possessiveness, accumulation and greed element in the British psyche. Hence the trade skills, etc.

    I'm just saying it's all a waste of time to hope on these things. I hope you get your "Brexit" soon so I can stop hearing about it, and we'll see in 10 years if the Pakis and the English pedophile rings at the highest level of society have magically disappeared or if the situation is in any way different than the rest of Europe. I predict it won't.

    We are all submitted to the same macro trends, the EU has very little to do with it, it's just a bogeyman, a symbol for small Whites' frustrations. The trends were there long before the EU became meaningful (again, refer to Enoch Powell's speech - it was all foreseeable back then for lucid people).

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  5. #233
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    ‘What Has Been Achieved Today Is Not Brexit’ - Rees-Mogg Calls for Vote of No Confidence in May


    Leading Brexiteer MP Jacob Rees-Mogg has submitted a letter of no confidence in Prime Minister Theresa May to the 1922 Committee, saying that the draft agreement with the European Union “is not Brexit.”




    Addressing media outside the Palace of Westminster Thursday afternoon, the MP for North East Somerset said:

    “The Conservative Party referendum on which almost all Conservative MPs stood, said specifically that we would leave the Customs Union. It did not have any small print that said ‘oh, unless we decide to have a backstop which is a permanent Customs Union which is harder to leave than leaving the European Union under Article 50.'”

    “What has been achieved today is not Brexit,” Mr Rees-Mogg said.

    “What we need is a leader who will say to the European Union, ‘It is impossible to divide up the United Kingdom, it is impossible to agree to a situation where we have a perpetual Customs Union, it is impossible to pay 39 billion of taxpayers’ money for a few promises which was meant to be 39 billion for an implementation of a deal, and it is impossible for us to allow the continuing jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.'”

    “If you look at the deal, our tariffs would be set by the European Union, and it would be illegal for us to offer lower tariffs. This is not Brexit, it is a failure of Government policy and it needs to be rejected.” “The first thing to do is to go back to Brussels,” he said, “and say: ‘Look, the option now is we leave with the rules we have already passed with no deal at all. And therefore we will move straight to WTO terms, we will be a third country, and we will operate on that basis. The basis on which we operate with the rest of the world.“Bear in mind that only seven per cent of the world’s population lives in the European Union. So dealing with the rest of the population of the world is very important.”

    The Brexiteer added that “one of the problems was having a Remainer [leading Brexit], and I recognise that compromises will have to be made. But the difficulty with having a Remainer is that people feel the compromises are made in a remain direction rather than a leave direction.”

    Taking his own name out of the runnings, Mr Rees-Mogg rattled off a list of Brexiteers in the party — Boris Johnson, David Davis, Dominic Raab, Esther McVey, and Penny Mordaunt — “who would be very capable of leading a proper Brexit.”

    Asked whether he thought there would be enough letters to trigger a vote of no confidence, the MP for North East Somerset said that he doubted there would be by the end of the day, and would not give a timeframe of when he believed the magic number of 48 would be hit.

    The influential Brexiteer had earlier in the day challenged Prime Minister May in the House of Commons, asking why he should not write a letter to the 1922 Committee’s chairman, Sir Graham Brady. Less than an hour later, the spokesman for the eurosceptic Tory European Research Group (ERG), chaired by Mr Rees-Mogg, confirmed that he had handed in his letter.

    Mr Rees-Mogg wrote: ”Regrettably, the draft Withdrawal Agreement presented to Parliament today has turned out to be worse than anticipated and fails to meet the promises given to the nation by the Prime Minister, either on her own account or on behalf of us all in the Conservative Party manifesto.”


    “It is of considerable importance that politicians stick to their commitments or do not make such commitments in the first place. Regrettably, this is not the situation, therefore, in accordance with the relevant rules and procedures of the Conservative Party and the 1922 Committee this is a formal letter of No Confidence in the Leader of the Party, the Rt. Hon. Theresa May. I am copying this letter to the Prime Minister and the Chief Whip and although I understand that it is possible for the correspondence to remain confidential I shall be making it public.”

    The 1922 Committee is a collection Tory MPs who do not hold government positions but its chairman oversees the election of a new party leader. Cabinet ministers, who work in government, take the committee’s views seriously, and if the party leader, who in this case is also the prime minister, loses the confidence of the 1922 that leader’s position would certainly be precarious. To trigger a challenge of leadership, 15 per cent of Tory MPs (48) must write letters of no confidence to Sir Graham. Once 48 letters are received, the chairman will trigger a no confidence vote.The Committee’s name comes from the date of a meeting on October 19th, 1922, when MPs met to end the party’s coalition with the Liberals which resulted in the bringing down of David Lloyd George’s government.



    Rees-Mogg Calls for Vote of No Confidence in May, ‘What Has Been Achieved Today Is Not Brexit’ 15 Nov 2018.



    Anyone: jew, coloured or mixed race, atheist, homosexual, etc. can be Prime Minister of the UK but just not a Catholic, especially if they are a practising believer.
    Bojo, on the other hand, is very far from as intelligent as JRM but his pedigree is suitable.



    Boris Johnson – Ethnicity of Celebs | What Nationality...

    Birth Name: Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson
    Place of Birth: Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S.
    Date of Birth: 19 June, 1964

    Ethnicity: English, 1/8th Turkish, 1/8th Ashkenazi Jewish, small amounts of Swiss-German, German, French, European Royal, and Irish

    Boris Johnson is a British politician, historian, and journalist. A member of the Conservative Party, he was Mayor of London, from 4 May, 2008 to 9 May, 2016, and Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, from 13 July, 2016 to 9 July, 2018. He has been an MP since 7 May, 2015. He was previously an MP from 9 June, 2001 to 4 June, 2008, among other duties.

  6. #234
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    Will government of Britain fall apart? What next if so?

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  8. #235
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahnenerbe View Post
    We are all submitted to the same macro trends, the EU has very little to do with it, it's just a bogeyman, a symbol for small Whites' frustrations. The trends were there long before the EU became meaningful (again, refer to Enoch Powell's speech - it was all foreseeable back then for lucid people).
    Powell did not mention the EU (European Economic Community as it was then) in that speech.

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Will government of Britain fall apart? What next if so?
    Ask again next week

  9. #236
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    German Populist Blames ‘Stubborn, Intransigent’ Merkel and Brussels For May’s Brexit Failure


    Populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) MP Petr Bystron has blamed the Brexit failures of UK Prime Minister Theresa May on the attitudes of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and the European Union who he labelled “stubborn” and “unhelpful.”



    Mr Bystron, who acts as Spokesman for the Alternative for Germany (AfD) on the Foreign Policy Committee of the German Bundestag, said that much of the blame for the outcome of the Brexit negotiations rested on Dr Merkel and her government.


    “Theresa May’s tragic failure is in large part due to the intransigent attitude of the Berlin government under Angela Merkel, who refused to negotiate constructively with the British government. While Theresa May tried valiantly to reach a compromise solution with Berlin and Brussels, Angela Merkel said two years ago there could be ‘No cherry-picking’ in Brexit negotiations,” he said.

    Bystron added, “you have to suspect the idea was to punish the British people for wanting to leave the EU superstate and thereby deter any other members from following the UK in their wish to regain their national sovereignty.”

    After the 500-page Brexit deal was released on Wednesday evening, many in the cabinet outright rejected the proposal leading to the resignation of several ministers including Brexit Minister Dominic Raab and Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey on Thursday morning.


    The deal was also labelled, “the worst deal in history” by former UK Independence Party leader Nigel Farage and was slammed by Tory Brexiteer MP Jacob Rees-Mogg who said, “…she hasn’t so much struck a deal as surrendered to Brussels, and given in to them on everything that they want, and tried to frustrate Brexit. It is not so much the vassal state any more, as the slave state.”
    On Thursday afternoon Rees-Mogg went a step further announcing his support for a vote of no confidence against Prime Minister May saying, “What has been achieved today is not Brexit.”


    A scrapping of a Brexit deal could lead to a no-deal scenario where the UK would operate under World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules.

    Mr Bystron commented on the effects of a no-deal outcome saying, “The British people are rightly angry about the stubborn and unhelpful attitude in Berlin and Brussels. The threat of a ‘No Deal Brexit’ according to WTO rules now looms large, which would hit Germany and the German auto industry the hardest.”

    “According to a study by Deloitte, a failure to get a Brexit deal could cost up to 18,000 jobs in the German auto industry. This is the direct fault of the Merkel government, who continue to drive Germany off the brink for no reason at all,” he added.



    German Populist Blames ‘Stubborn, Intransigent’ Merkel and Brussels For May’s Brexit Failure 16 Nov 2016.




    The whole EU hierarchy are fanatically committed ‘globalists’. In addition, Merkel is a staunch communist. As an example to the other EU countries, all the Eurorats are determined to destroy the UK for daring to leave. Merkel learned nothing from the 2015 invasion but to direct operations with little or no publicity.

    Hopefully this Brexit will end with No Deal and we get our country back.

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  11. #237
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    "Bystron added, “you have to suspect the idea was to punish the British people for wanting to leave the EU superstate and thereby deter any other members from following the UK in their wish to regain their national sovereignty.”"

    Exactly. But I think Theresa May's deal is reasonably good - it gives us back immigration control and fishing rights with decent trade arrangements. Northern Ireland is slightly ripped off but we cannot have the tail wagging the dog.

    Those Conservatives who want a 'no deal' are pirate capitalists - they have no sympathy with ethno-nationalism.

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  13. #238
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    Just 28% of Britons Want to Stop Brexit, Plurality Wants May to Go


    Just 28% of Britons want to stop Brexit while a plurality wants Theresa May to step down as prime minister.


    YouGov asked a sample of citizens where they wanted to go next with Brexit and 16% said that Britain should accept the draft deal arranged between bureaucrats in the European Union and Prime Minister Theresa May, while 11% said the country should reject it and negotiate a different deal.


    However, a higher number, 19%, said that Britain should reject it and leave the EU without any deal, trading with the bloc as it does with other international countries on World Trade Organization (WTO) terms.



    Just a combined 36% want to stop Brexit one way or another, either by stopping Brexit now and remaining in the EU (28%) or holding a “People’s Vote” on whether to accept the draft deal (8%) — an endeavour by Remainers to legitimise a second referendum in hopes that, this time, Britons will vote ‘the right way.’


    The survey, published Friday, found a plurality of the general population, 47%, think that Theresa May should stand down as Conservative Party leader and prime minister, with 33% wishing for her to remain.

    55% of leave voters want her to go, while with remain voters it is closely split between those who want her to stay (40%) versus those who want her to leave (39%).
    A slim majority of Tory voters (46/43%) want her to remain in post.




    The survey also found that a plurality, 45%, do not believe that the draft deal respects the spirit of the June 2016 referendum. Only 28 % believes that it respects the result.

    This plurality is represented not just across the general population (45/28), but amongst Remainers (33/41), Leavers (26/58), Conservatives (32/54), and Labour voters (26/48).

    Just 28 Percent of Britons Want to Stop Brexit, Plurality Wants May to Go 17 Nov 2018.


    Hotel California “You can checkout anytime but you can never leave.”

    The Truth About Brexit



    Paul Joseph Watson | It was designed to fail from the outset.



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    EU warns May that delaying Brexit will cost Britain an extra £10bn


    Theresa May has asked the EU ‘a few extra months’ in order to secure the best possible trade deal for Britain and to reach an acceptable solution to the Irish border.


    However, last night, leaders said that any transition period extension would have to be at least one year. On top of this, Brussels negotiators have said that it will add an extra £10 billion on top of the already sizeable £40bn divorce bill.


    After Brexiteer cabinet members putting pressure on her to change Writing in the Sun on Sunday, May warned what might happen if she is ousted as leader or her deal is rejected: “If MPs reject the deal, they will simply take us back to square one. “It would mean more division, more uncertainty and a failure to deliver on the vote of the British people. “There is no alternative plan on the table. There is no different approach that we could agree with the EU. “The course I have set is the right one for our country and the only one that will work. “The path before us is not easy, but with determination and hard work, I know we can deliver a deal in the national interest. One that builds a more secure, prosperous Britain, whose best days lie ahead. That is the brighter future that awaits us. “I am determined to get us there. I will not let you down.”

    However, Commons leader Andrea Leadsom and one of the ‘gang of five’, including Leave supporters Michael Gove, Liam Fox, Chris Grayling and Penny Mourdant, insist there is more to be done on the withdrawal terms set out in the current agreement. In addition, so far 23 out of the 48 Conservatives required have written letters of no confidence in May in order to trigger a leadership election. Should May keep her position, the Prime Minister’s biggest fight will come around December, when Parliament will vote on the Deal. 318 votes will be needed in the Commons if all 650 MPs are present, but May will only be confident of around 230 votes.

    Whether she can win over a majority of the 80 hardcore Tory Brexiteer rebels, the 10 DUP MPs, and potentially dozens of Labour MPs, in order to push the deal through remains to be seen.


    EU warns May that delaying Brexit will cost Britain an extra £10bn 18 November 2018.


    May, if she gets away with a media sell of this rotten deal, is is intent on making the UK a vassal state of the Cooperate euSSR.

    Like Merkel, May Must Go.

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    The 40 "Hidden Horrors" Of Theresa May's Brexit Deal


    40 "Hidden Horrors" of May's Brexit Deal


    After a chaotic week that saw seven of Theresa May's senior cabinet ministers resign (including her second Brexit commissioner in six months), London business leaders poured salt in the prime minister's wounds late Friday by leaking the text of a letter they will reportedly be sending to MPs next week urging them to reject May's 'best of all possible deals' and instead advocate for a "no deal" Brexit where the UK and EU fall back on WTO rules, according to the Telegraph.


    After more than a year of increasingly fraught negotiations, May has pulled off an incredible feat - she and her cabinet have produced a deal that is hated by both Brexiteers and remainers alike.


    And as Bloomberg illustrates in the graphic below, even a cursory look at a possible vote breakdown shows that the odds of May passing her deal as-is are not looking good (though the EU has reportedly signaled that it might be open to reworking some of the details surrounding the backstop to make it more palatable to members of the European Research Group, the contingent of rapidly pro-Brexit conservative MPs).




    After a chaotic week that saw seven of Theresa May's senior cabinet ministers resign (including her second Brexit commissioner in six months), London business leaders poured salt in the prime minister's wounds late Friday by leaking the text of a letter they will reportedly be sending to MPs next week urging them to reject May's 'best of all possible deals' and instead advocate for a "no deal" Brexit where the UK and EU fall back on WTO rules, according to the Telegraph.


    After more than a year of increasingly fraught negotiations, May has pulled off an incredible feat - she and her cabinet have produced a deal that is hated by both Brexiteers and remainers alike.


    And as Bloomberg illustrates in the graphic below, even a cursory look at a possible vote breakdown shows that the odds of May passing her deal as-is are not looking good (though the EU has reportedly signaled that it might be open to reworking some of the details surrounding the backstop to make it more palatable to members of the European Research Group, the contingent of rapidly pro-Brexit conservative MPs).



    After a chaotic week that saw seven of Theresa May's senior cabinet ministers resign (including her second Brexit commissioner in six months), London business leaders poured salt in the prime minister's wounds late Friday by leaking the text of a letter they will reportedly be sending to MPs next week urging them to reject May's 'best of all possible deals' and instead advocate for a "no deal" Brexit where the UK and EU fall back on WTO rules, according to the Telegraph.


    After more than a year of increasingly fraught negotiations, May has pulled off an incredible feat - she and her cabinet have produced a deal that is hated by both Brexiteers and remainers alike.


    And as Bloomberg illustrates in the graphic below, even a cursory look at a possible vote breakdown shows that the odds of May passing her deal as-is are not looking good (though the EU has reportedly signaled that it might be open to reworking some of the details surrounding the backstop to make it more palatable to members of the European Research Group, the contingent of rapidly pro-Brexit conservative MPs).





    And with May facing a gruelling schedule between now and Brexit day...



    ...And myriad opportunities to stumble into a 'no deal' scenario...




    ...it's somewhat surprising that Deutsche Bank analysts argued in a note to clients released on Friday that they still expect a 'soft Brexit' as their 'base case'. Specifically, they expect a modified version of the current deal passing at the last minute after Theresa May survives a leadership challenge, but fails to push the deal in its current form through Parliament. If the EU refuses to renegotiate, any modified deal would probably favor a softer Brexit. If she can't rally support for that deal (presumably by winning over votes from Labour), her best option at that point would be to call for another referendum. A day earlier, DB set the odds at 50% that May either calls for a second referendum or resigns.





    As even the casual observer could probably intuit by now, should May resign (or be forced out via a 'no confidence' vote, a scenario that would be decidedly worse for markets) the odds of a 'hard Brexit' would climb significantly.According to DB, the top four of the five most likely successors to May are all in favor of a "no deal" Brexit that would involve the UK and EU falling back on WTO rules. But while this would greatly increase the odds of a 'hard Brexit', it wouldn't be fair to interpret this as a foregone conclusion. That's because pro-remain Torys could respond by forcing a new general election which would risk handing power to Labour. Or they could simply accept a "hard Brexit" and whatever short term economic turmoil that might bring.


    With all of this in mind, May's remaining cabinet ministers are reportedly staying on to try and influence the deal from the inside, with Liam Fox, May's secretary for international trade, insisting that "a deal is better than no deal."


    Though, as the Spectator explained in a piece published Saturday, the Brexiteers fear that the current deal could leave the UK bound to the EU customs union indefinitely, while surrounding any say in how the trade bloc sets its rules.


    In summary: The supposed ‘transition period’ could last indefinitely or, more specifically, to an undefined date sometime this century (“up to 31 December 20XX”, Art. 132). So while this Agreement covers what the government is calling Brexit, what we in fact get is: ‘transition’ + extension indefinitely (by however many years we are willing to pay for) + all of those extra years from the ‘plus 8 years’ articles.


    Should it end within two years, as May hopes, the UK will still be signed up to clauses keeping us under certain rules (like VAT and ECJ supervision) for a further eight years. Some clauses have, quite literally, a “lifetime” duration (Art.39). If the UK defaults on transition, we go in to the backstop with the Customs Union and, realistically, the single market. We can only leave the transition positively with a deal. But we sign away the money. So the EU has no need to give us a deal, and certainly no incentive to make the one they offered ‘better’ than the backstop. The European Court of Justice remains sovereign, as repeatedly stipulated. Perhaps most damagingly of all, we agree to sign away the rights we would have, under international law, to unilaterally walk away. Again, what follows relates (in most part) for the “transition” period. But the language is consistent with the E.U. imagining that this will be the final deal.


    560+ page draft deal document, while the controversial backstop provision has taken most of the criticism, many of the deal's finer points remain deeply suspect.


    But the language surrounding the backstop isn't the only component of the deal that's deeply suspect. Below is a list of the top 40 draft deal "horrors" (courtesy of the Spectator):



    1. May says her deal means the UK leaves the EU next March. The Withdrawal Agreement makes a mockery of this. “All references to Member States and competent authorities of Member States…shall be read as including the United Kingdom.” (Art 6).
    2. Not quite what most people understand by Brexit. It goes on to spell out that the UK will be in the EU but without any MEPs, a commissioner or ECJ judges. We are effectively a Member State, but we are excused – or, more accurately, excluded – from attending summits. (Article 7)
    3. The European Court of Justice is decreed to be our highest court, governing the entire Agreement – Art. 4. stipulates that both citizens and resident companies can use it. Art 4.2 orders our courts to recognise this. “If the European Commission considers that the United Kingdom has failed to fulfil an obligation under the Treaties or under Part Four of this Agreement before the end of the transition period, the European Commission may, within 4 years after the end of the transition period, bring the matter before the Court of Justice of the European Union”. (Art. 87)
    4. The jurisdiction of the ECJ will last until eight years after the end of the transition period. (Article 158).
    5. The UK will still be bound by any future changes to EU law in which it will have no say, not to mention having to comply with current law. (Article 6(2))
    6. Any disputes under the Agreement will be decided by EU law only – one of the most dangerous provisions. (Article 168).
    7. This cuts the UK off from International Law, something we’d never do with any foreign body. Arbitration will be governed by the existing procedural rules of the EU law – this is not arbitration as we would commonly understand it (i.e. between two independent parties). (Article 174)
    8. “UNDERLINING that this Agreement is founded on an overall balance of benefits, rights and obligations for the Union and the United Kingdom” No, it should be based upon the binding legal obligations upon the EU contained within Article 50. It is wrong to suggest otherwise.
    9. The tampon tax clause: We obey EU laws on VAT, with no chance of losing the tampon tax even if we agree a better deal in December 2020 because we hereby agree to obey other EU VAT rules for **five years** after the transition period. Current EU rules prohibit 0-rated VAT on products (like tampons) that did not have such exemptions before the country joined the EU.
    10. Several problems with the EU’s definitions: “Union law” is too widely defined and “United Kingdom national” is defined by the Lisbon Treaty: we should given away our right to define our citizens. The “goods” and the term “services” we are promised the deal are not defined – or, rather, will be defined however the EU wishes them to be. Thus far, this a non-defined term so far. This agreement fails to define it.
    11. The Mandelson Pension Clause: The UK must promise never to tax former EU officials based here – such as Peter Mandelson or Neil Kinnock – on their E.U. pensions, or tax any current Brussels bureaucrats on their salaries. The EU and its employees are to be immune to our tax laws. (Article 104)
    12. Furthermore, the UK agrees not to prosecute EU employees who are, or who might be deemed in future, criminals (Art.101)
    13. The GDPR clause. The General Data Protection Regulation – the EU’s stupidest law ever? – is to be bound into UK law(Articles 71 to 73). There had been an expectation in some quarters that the UK could get out of it.
    14. The UK establishes a ‘Joint Committee’ with EU representatives to guarantee ‘the implementation and application of this Agreement’. This does not sound like a withdrawal agreement – if it was, why would it need to be subject to continued monitoring? (Article 164).
    15. This Joint Committee will have subcommittees with jurisdiction over: (a) citizens’ rights; (b) “other separation provisions”; (c) Ireland/Northern Ireland; (d) Sovereign Base Areas in Cyprus; (e) Gibraltar; and (f) financial provisions. (Article 165)
    16. The Lifetime clause: the agreement will last as long as the country’s youngest baby lives. “the persons covered by this Part shall enjoy the rights provided for in the relevant Titles of this Part for their lifetime”. (Article 39).
    17. The UK is shut out of all EU networks and databases for security – yet no such provision exists to shut the EU out of ours. (Article 8)
    18. The UK will tied to EU foreign policy, “bound by the obligations stemming from the international agreements concluded by the Union” but unable to influence such decisions. (Article 124)
    19. All EU citizens must be given permanent right of residence after five years – but what counts as residence? This will be decided by the EU, rather than UK rules. (Articles 15-16)
    20. Britain is granted the power to send a civil servant to Brussels to watch them pass stupid laws which will hurt our economy. (Article 34)
    21. The UK agrees to spend taxpayers’ money telling everyone how wonderful the agreement is. (Article 37)
    22. Art 40 defines Goods. It seems to includes Services and Agriculture. We may come to discover that actually ‘goods’ means everything.
    23. Articles 40-49 practically mandate the UK’s ongoing membership of the Customs Union in all but name.
    24. The UK will be charged to receive the data/information we need in order to comply with EU law. (Article 50). The EU will continue to set rules for UK intellectual property law (Article 54 to 61). The UK will effectively be bound by a non-disclosure agreement swearing us to secrecy regarding any EU developments we have paid to be part. This is not mutual. The EU is not bound by such measures. (Article 74)
    25. The UK is bound by EU rules on procurement rules – which effectively forbids us from seeking better deals elsewhere. (Articles 75 to 78)
    26. We give up all rights to any data the EU made with our money (Art. 103)
    27. The EU decide capital projects (too broadly defined) the UK is liable for. (Art. 144)
    28. The UK is bound by EU state aid laws until future agreement – even in the event of an agreement, this must wait four years to be valid. (Article 93)
    29. Similar advantages and immunities are extended to all former MEPs and to former EU official more generally. (Articles 106-116)
    30. The UK is forbidden from revealing anything the EU told us or tells us about the finer points of deal and its operation. (Article 105).
    31. Any powers the UK parliament might have had to mitigate EU law are officially removed. (Article 128)
    32. The UK shall be liable for any “outstanding commitments” after 2022 (Article 142(2) expressly mentions pensions, which gives us an idea as to who probably negotiated this). The amount owed will be calculated by the EU. (Articles 140-142)
    33. The UK will be liable for future EU lending. As anyone familiar with the EU’s financials knows, this is not good. (Article143)
    34. The UK will remain liable for capital projects approved by the European Investment Bank. (Article 150).
    35. The UK will remain a ‘party’ (i.e. cough up money) for the European Development Fund. (Articles 152-154)
    36. And the EU continues to calculate how much money the UK should pay it. So thank goodness Brussels does not have any accountancy issues.
    37. The UK will remain bound (i.e coughing up money) to the European Union Emergency Trust Fund – which deals with irregular migration (i.e. refugees) and displaced persons heading to Europe. (Article 155)
    38. The agreement will be policed by ‘the Authority’ – a new UK-based body with ‘powers equivalent to those of the European Commission’. (Article 159)
    39. The EU admits, in Art. 184, that it is in breach of Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty which oblige it to “conclude an agreement” of the terms of UK leaving the EU. We must now, it seems, “negotiate expeditiously the agreements governing their future relationship.” And if the EU does not? We settle down to this Agreement.
    40. And, of course, the UK will agree to pay £40bn to receive all of these ‘privileges’. (Article 138)



    The 40 "Hidden Horrors" Of Theresa May's Brexit Deal ...


    The UK voted for independence from the EU but the problem is that our politicians are globalists.

    "a deal is better than no deal." No "a BAD deal is not better than no deal." Let’s just return to how it was pre EU pre 1973.

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