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Thread: Distribution of CCR5-delta 32 gene deletion across the Russian part of Eurasia

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    Post CCR5- Russia and part of Eurasia

    Distribution of CCR5-delta 32 gene deletion across the Russian part of Eurasia


    N. S. Yudin A1, V. Vinogradov Sergey A1, Tatyana A. Potapova A1, Tatyana M. Naykova A1, Violetta V. Sitnikova A1, Igor V. Kulikov A2, Viacheslav I. Khasnulin A3, Cheche Konchuk A4, Pavel E. Vloschinskii A5, Sergey V. Ivanov A6, Viktor F. Kobzev A1, Aida G. Romaschenko A1, Mikhail I. Voevoda

    A1 Laboratory of Animal Molecular Genetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Lavrentyeva Avenue 10, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia e-mail: yudin@bionet.nsc.ru, Tel.: +7-3832-333118, Fax: +7-3832-331278
    A2 Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Internal Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Vladimirovsky Spusk 2-a, Novosibirsk 630003, Russia
    A3 Institute of General Pathology and Human Ecology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
    A4 Usubnur International Center, Tuva Republic, Russia
    A5 Institute of Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
    A6 IRSP, SAIC-Frederick, MD 21702, USA


    Abstract:


    Abstract 32-bp inactivating deletion in the g-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene, common in Nothern European populations, is associated with reduced HIV-1 transmission risk and delayed disease progression. We have studied the deletion distribution in many populations in Eurasia by polymerase chain reaction analysis of 531 DNA samples representing West and East Siberian, Central Asian, and Far Eastern parts of Russia. An unusually high frequency (11.1%) of the deleted variant in natives of West Siberia, of Finno-Ugrian descent, was observed. Furthermore, the deletion was infrequent in indigenous populations of Central Asia, East Siberia, the Russian Far East, and Canada. We conclude that the jccr5 distribution is limited primarily to Europeans and related western Siberian Finno-Ugrian populations, with a sharp negative gradient toward the east along the territory of Russian Asia.

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    Post Distribution of CCR5-delta 32 gene deletion across the Russian part of Eurasia

    Hum Genet. 1998 Jun;102(6):695-8.


    Distribution of CCR5-delta 32 gene deletion across the Russian part of Eurasia.

    Yudin NS, Vinogradov SV, Potapova TA, Naykova TM, Sitnikova VV, Kulikov IV, Khasnulin VI, Konchuk C, Vloschinskii PE, Ivanov SV, Kobzev VF, Romaschenko AG, Voevoda MI.

    Laboratory of Animal Molecular Genetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk. yudin@bionet.nsc.ru

    32-bp inactivating deletion in the beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene, common in Nothern European populations, is associated with reduced HIV-1 transmission risk and delayed disease progression. We have studied the deletion distribution in many populations in Eurasia by polymerase chain reaction analysis of 531 DNA samples representing West and East Siberian, Central Asian, and Far Eastern parts of Russia. An unusually high frequency (11.1%) of the deleted variant in natives of West Siberia, of Finno-Ugrian descent, was observed. Furthermore, the deletion was infrequent in indigenous populations of Central Asia, East Siberia, the Russian Far East, and Canada. We conclude that the delta(ccr5) distribution is limited primarily to Europeans and related western Siberian Finno-Ugrian populations, with a sharp negative gradient toward the east along the territory of Russian Asia.
    Last edited by Euclides; Tuesday, August 24th, 2004 at 12:58 AM.

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