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Thread: The Day-Dream of Market Economy in the DPRK

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    Senior Member ogenoct's Avatar
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    Post The Day-Dream of Market Economy in the DPRK

    THE DAY-DREAM OF MARKET ECONOMY IN THE DPRK

    20th August Juche 93 (2004)

    By:
    Alejandro Cao de Benos de Les y Perez
    Special Delegate –DPRK Government
    President of the Korean Friendship Association (KFA)
    Delegate Counselor of the National Democratic Front of South Korea
    (NDFSK)


    Since many years ago and after considering that a military attack will
    have a severe retaliation and end in defeat, the USA Administration, by
    using and sponsoring several organizations under the fake mask of
    ‘NGO’s’ and ‘Human Rights’ is looking for all kind of strategies to destroy
    the socialist system of North Korea.

    One of the most aired proposals is to ‘help’ the DPRK to develop its
    economy and engage in market reforms that eventually will bring
    capitalism to the country. Something like a ‘Chinese model’ that will end up
    fracturing the society, creating new rich-poor class and eventually force
    the leadership to surrender or leave, so at last the big multinational
    corporations will have another 22 million people to enslave and
    thousands of square kilometers to exploit.

    This is the policy of a day-dreamer. The government of the DPRK has
    full control over all the industries and markets, and knows perfectly that
    a single private company will mean the beginning of a soft-landing
    invasion plan.

    This ‘plan of attack’ isn’t aimed only to the internal market of the
    country, but to the external as well. By inventing sensationalist news
    combined with influence in the media and paying some journalists, they
    pretend to tarnish the image of the DPRK to the point of completely
    isolating it, so Pyongyang will feel pressured to unconditionally accept the
    changes and start dismantling the social paradise that is being built
    since 1948.

    To demonstrate the manipulation, and how the USA tries to broadcast its
    own ignorance spreading the speculation, here are some comments about
    the recent news from the other side of the line.

    1. Advertisement of ‘Fiparam car’ in Pyongyang
    2. The ‘Tongil Market’
    3. The food stalls in the street.
    4. Mobile phones are dismantled

    1.
    Around one year ago, in Pyongyang appeared some billboards showing a
    car, called ‘Fiparam’ (whistle) that is produced by the joint-venture
    Pyonghwa Motors.
    Some tourists and visitors rushed to say that this demonstrated that
    market economy (capitalism) was entering inside the country and that
    advertisements started to appear everywhere. Immediately the press made
    echo of this information.
    Obviously, the foreigners didn’t know that this is something common
    since the creation of the DPRK. It’s a national pride when a new modern
    vehicle is created, especially considering that it’s made by joining
    hands between North and South Korean brothers.
    When a locomotive or other industrial achievement is created, it
    becomes object of admiration and symbol of progress of the country, not a
    landmark for shopping or class distinction. This is the reality about why
    the billboards were created.
    For your information, even if you managed somehow to have enough money
    to buy the car, in the DPRK it’s not allowed for an individual to
    acquire it, so a businessman will think: isn’t it completely absurd to
    advertise something that cannot be sold?
    Yes, as absurd and ignorant as the people that thought that an
    advertisement only can be created for sales purpose.

    2.
    Even today people talk pages speculating about Tongil market. This
    business is 100% government owned and operated. There’re no private sellers
    or private benefit, nor can an individual citizen go there and sell his
    own products and set his own price.
    So again the science-fiction tales about ‘first private market’ shows
    the impotency of the USA trying to prevent its frustration about a ‘plan
    to destroy the DPRK’ that it has been demonstrated useless since its
    very beginning.

    3.
    It’s a common trend that some people that go to Pyongyang for one week,
    suddenly call themselves ‘experts’ in a country and system they don’t
    even have seen the mere surface.
    Not too long ago, the DPRK decided to open in all the cities public
    Karaoke and open-air restaurants as well as food stalls in the streets to
    supply the citizens with ice-cream, pastry and drinks in order to
    improve their daily life and enjoyment of the people.
    Each one of these little businesses depends from a government district
    branch, so each single cent of the benefit is given to the state.
    Again, they’re completely public and not private markets like many
    speculators wrote in the media.

    4.
    After the unfortunate accident of the train explosion in Ryongchon, the
    network of mobile phones in the country was dismantled. This again
    served as an excuse to create many fiction novels and imaginations
    speculating that a ‘mobile phone was used to detonate the bomb in Ryongchon to
    commit a crime against the DPRK leadership’.
    Frankly speaking, a saboteur must be really stupid if he detonates a
    bomb seven hours after his objective passed the railway station.
    The only truth about the decision of the dismantlement was that the GSM
    coverage, especially near the borders of China and South Korea, was
    being intercepted by foreign intelligence.
    So the journalists that said that ‘the mobile phone network in North
    Korea is private’, or that ‘a new class of rich people with mobile phones
    emerged in North Korea’ failed shamelessly after they realize now that
    everything in the country is made for the common prosperity and
    security of all the people and that a ‘market economy’ will never be
    considered but as a well known disaster for the society.

    The DPRK will keep on looking for formulas to improve its socialist
    economy and the life standards of the people maintaining the equality, but
    never looking into the capitalism and privatization as a solution.

    Right after our President Kim Il Sung passed away in 1994, our Leader
    Kim Jong Il called all Ministers and main figures of the Government and
    Party and said to them ‘DO NOT EXPECT ANY CHANGE FROM ME’.

    I think this clearly summarizes the spirit of the DPRK in the Era of
    Songun, where the Country, the Party, the Army and the People are united
    now in 2004 like they were since the beginning, forming one common
    front like one big family.

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    Post Re: The Day-Dream of Market Economy in the DPRK

    Quote Originally Posted by ogenoct

    The DPRK will keep on looking for formulas to improve its socialist
    economy and the life standards of the people maintaining the equality, but
    never looking into the capitalism and privatization as a solution.
    The Chinese leadership is a lot more astute than that of the DPRK, since they have learned how to maintain a firm grip on the reins of power, while at the same time luring foreign capital into the country in order to develop it at a phenomenal rate. It is because of this strategy that China is on the road to becoming the superpower of the 21st century.

    The DPRK, due to its small size, could never hope to be a superpower, but it would benefit the entire country economically if it followed the Chinese road - which would in turn cement the power of the current regime there, if they had a more subtle grip on political psychology than they currently do. As it is, the DPRK avoids total collapse only because both China and South Korea would rather keep it intact (though food aid, investment, etc.) than have to deal with the massive flood of refugees that would pour into their countries if they allowed the DPRK to collapse. The more intelligent DPRK leaders are surely aware of this, no matter what sort of spin they put on the situation in their propaganda.

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    Senior Member ogenoct's Avatar
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    Post Re: The Day-Dream of Market Economy in the DPRK

    Quote Originally Posted by Telperion
    it would benefit the entire country economically if it followed the Chinese road
    The DPRK is a prospering nation, despite the propaganda from the Western imperialist press. If it followed the "Chinese road" it would betray the very values it stands for and owes its existence to - namely socialism. Following the "Chinese road" would transform one of the last bastions against the Monolith of Materialism into another dependant of the globalizing nature of capitalism.

    Constantin

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    Post Re: The Day-Dream of Market Economy in the DPRK

    Quote Originally Posted by ogenoct
    The DPRK is a prospering nation, despite the propaganda from the Western imperialist press.
    That seems doubtful, and is not consistent with the country's own appeals for annual donations of food, medicine, etc. from abroad, even though it once had the industrial and agricultural capacity to produce adequate supplies of these things itself. Also, there are a number of satellite photos of northeast Asia at night that you can find if you do a search online, and they all show a dark North Korea surrounded by the brightly-lit cities of South Korea and Manchuria. A lack of electricty in North Korea (implied by these photographs) is surely a symptom of serious economic difficulties. All of this more consistent with a country that is declining into third-world status than one that is rising to developed country levels of prosperity.

    If it followed the "Chinese road" it would betray the very values it stands for and owes its existence to - namely socialism. Following the "Chinese road" would transform one of the last bastions against the Monolith of Materialism into another dependant of the globalizing nature of capitalism.
    That is true, but there is a trade-off involved. By immersing itself in the global trading and financial system, China is not only growing its economy at a very rapid pace, but is setting itself up to torpedo the US economy once the time is right. Not only does the US currently have a huge trade deficit with China, but an increasing number of US government bonds (used to fund the ever-expanding public debt of the US) are held by China, and China's currency manipulations have played a major role in preventing the US dollar's exchange rate from declining catastrophically.

    When China is ready, it can use its bond and exhange-rate levers to provoke a financial crisis in the US that will destroy the US economy, and ultimately its capacity to finance its military capabilities (just as the US did to the Soviet Union during the 1980's, although by different methods). China will then be in a position to establish itself as the world's leading economic and military power, without firing a shot. This long-term strategy is clear to those who know what patterns to look for, and is certainly a brilliant move on the part of the Chinese leadership.

    North Korea, by contrast, has dug a fairly deep hole for itself, where it relies on an enormous and (but technologically unsophisticated) military to defend itself from US military action, thereby imposing an enormous burden on its domestic economy. That is the path that the Soviet Union followed for decades, and we know what happened to them, despite their having far more resources than North Korea.

    Counterfactually, if China had followed North Korea's model, where would they be today? They would surely be a bloated but impoverished military giant, as was the Soviet Union before it collapsed. It is only because China has embarked on its current path that it is on route to establishing itself as the world's leading economic as well as military power. Once they are, they will be in a position to set whatever terms for others that they wish.

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