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Thread: Low Testosterone in Men Widespread Epidemic

  1. #1
    Senior Member Veršandi's Avatar
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    Low Testosterone in Men Widespread Epidemic

    A male's total testosterone level may be linked to more than just sexual health and muscle mass preservation, a new study finds. Low amounts of the hormone could also be associated with chronic disease, even among men 40 years of age and younger.

    "If we look at data for men from a population level, it has become evident over time that chronic disease is on the rise in older males," says Mark Peterson, Ph.D., M.S., FACSM, lead author of the study and assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Michigan Medicine. "But we're also finding that a consequence of being obese and physically inactive is that men are seeing declines in testosterone even at younger ages."

    Published in Scientific Reports, Peterson and colleagues studied this relationship among testosterone, age and chronic disease.

    "Previous research in the field has shown that total testosterone deficiency in men increases with age, and studies have shown that testosterone deficiency is also associated with obesity-related chronic diseases," Peterson says. "But it hasn't been previously understood what the optimal levels of total testosterone should be in men at varying ages, and to what effect those varying levels of the hormone have on disease risk across the life span."

    The study's basis came from previous work from other researchers that appeared to define normal ranges of testosterone but didn't use population-representative cohorts, he says.

    "Previous studies used clinical cohorts that were not reflective of the current male population in the United States," Peterson says. "The cohorts they used enforced strict guidelines for patients that were accepted into the cohort. Therefore, those patients tended to be much healthier."

    Peterson and colleagues, then, leveraged a population sample that was much more representative of males in the United States today.

    Multimorbidity across age groups

    Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the research team examined the extent to which hypogonadism is prevalent among men of all ages.

    Of the 2,399 men in the survey who were at least 20 years old, 2,161 had complete information on demographics (e.g., age, ethnicity and household income), chronic disease diagnoses, blood samples obtained for total testosterone, grip strength and lab results for cardiometabolic disease risk factors.

    Peterson and team then examined prevalence of nine chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, stroke, pulmonary disease, high triglycerides, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and clinical depression.

    The researchers studied the prevalence of multimorbidity, or when two or more of the chronic conditions were present, among three age groups (young, middle-aged and older men) with and without testosterone deficiency. They found that low total testosterone was associated with multimorbidity in all age groups -- but it was more prevalent among young and older men with testosterone deficiency.

    "We also found a large dose-response relationship between the age-specific low total testosterone and moderate total testosterone levels and multimorbidity, even after adjusting for obesity and muscle strength capacity," Peterson says. "Which means that men should be concerned about declining total testosterone, even if it has not reached a level to warrant a clinical diagnosis (<300 ng/dL [10.4 nmol/L])."

    Co-author Aleksandr Belakovskiy, M.D., a resident in family medicine at Michigan Medicine, who helped to design and carry out the study, notes that the results show the need for further testing and research.

    "This study showed a robust association between testosterone and multiple medical morbidities that could influence the way we think about testosterone in general practice," Belakovskiy says. "While these findings cannot prove causation, it does spark the need for better clinical awareness and more research."

    The team hopes the study and its results can serve as a public service announcement for men.

    "A lot of men may not be aware of the risk factors for testosterone deficiency because of their current lifestyle," Peterson says. "And more importantly, that declining levels could be contributing to a silent decline in overall health and increased risk for chronic disease."
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  3. #2
    Senior Member SaxonPagan's Avatar
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    The Testosterone Crisis

    You're Not The Man Your Father Was

    According to a recent report from JAMA, testosterone therapy among American men is on the rise. From 2010 to 2013, prescriptions more than doubled, which researchers partially attribute to ubiquitous drug marketing campaigns urging older men to boost “low T” levels. The swell of interest reflects a genuine physiological shift: Across the population, men today have less testosterone compared to men of the same age a generation ago. Asking why requires untangling a complex web of social, environmental, and behavioral factors that are dismantling age-old ideas about masculinity and triggering real anxiety over changing gender roles.

    Studies show that men’s testosterone levels have been declining for decades. The most prominent, a 2007 study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, revealed a “substantial” drop in U.S. men’s testosterone levels since the 1980s, with average levels declining by about 1% per year. This means, for example, that a 60-year-old man in 2004 had testosterone levels 17% lower than those of a 60-year-old in 1987. Another study of Danish men produced similar findings, with double-digit declines among men born in the 1960s compared to those born in the 1920s.

    The challenges to men’s health don’t end there. Rates of certain reproductive disorders (like testicular cancer) have risen over time, while multiple European studies have found that sperm counts are sinking. These trends coincide with a decline in musculoskeletal strength among young men: In a 2016 study, the average 20- to 34-year-old man could apply 98 pounds of force with a right-handed grip, down from 117 pounds by a man of the same age in 1985. Though grip strength isn’t necessarily a proxy for overall fitness, it’s a strong predictor of future mortality.

    What’s behind all the downward trends? The answer is complicated. The decline in testosterone levels is almost certainly linked to higher rates of obesity (which suppresses testosterone) and may be linked to lower rates of smoking in men (since nicotine is a potent aromatase inhibitor). In the 2007 study, however, the age-matched declines persisted after controlling for these variables. Many observers put more weight on increased exposure to environmental toxins, such as pesticides, parabens, and chemicals common in household products like phthalates and bisphenol A.

    Also playing a role are long-term shifts in the ways we work and live. Young men are far less likely to hold jobs in manual labor, so they don’t have to be as physically strong as previous generations. Meanwhile, certain forms of close relationships—such as marriage, fatherhood, and increased time spent with children—are causally linked to lower testosterone levels. Yet here again the evidence is muddled: On the one hand, Gen-X and Millennial men are marrying later and having fewer kids. On the other hand, young men today are more likely to live with other people—which may promote prosocial hormones like oxytocin that are natural antagonists to testosterone. And those who are fathers are spending more time with their children.


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    Senior Member SaxonPagan's Avatar
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    Testosterone calculations are farcical.

    The docs can’t agree on what ‘normal’ levels are and many consider anything between 270 and 800 to be ‘normal’. Well, let me tell you now (even as a non-specialist) that if you’re a young man with a reading below 400 you have a major problem!

    However, you can theoretically have a score of 1,000 and your free testosterone (which is what counts!) could be minimal. This is most unlikely; there’s usually a correlation between the bound & free stuff but certain medical conditions can keep the free T low despite an impressive overall total.

    Then there are the fluctuations throughout the day. I often read that the best time to get checked is before 11 a.m. because levels wane as the day progresses, but IMO this just masks the problem by choosing the moment when your score will be highest. Nor will you get the same reading at the same time on two different days – except by coincidence.

    There are several other anomalies too (…how long do we have? ) and my conclusion is that there’s a lot of randomness involved, but when you read about ‘generational declines’ - as is the case here – there’s definitely a pattern that cannot be ignored. Mention testosterone and everyone thinks of *SEX*, probably followed by aggression, but low T levels are also linked with increased anger and irritability … does this sound like our societies today?

    Anyway, my current level is 575 which means I’m good for a while yet. I wasn’t overly concerned but for the past couple of years I’ve had something vaguely diagnosed as CFS so they ran a hormone check, along with tests for AIDS and diabetes … all fine The doc more or less told me he doesn’t have a clue where my lack of energy is coming from, so I said: “oh well, maybe I’m just a lazy b*st*rd!?” and he cracked up “I couldn’t possibly say” was his diplomatic reply.

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    I've commented about this before. Testosterone is overrated and even bad when too high. Many medical experts agree that testosterone levels in men are too high. You simply don't need much to function normally and even have kids. But too much can cause aggressive and oversexed tendencies. Keep it a a minimal level. Better for the human race.

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    Don't know is there direct or some kind of link to this ... but I think this is more important/serious matter than testosterone level (alone)?

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/b...s-1349924.html

    I don't think Finns (men) are here more healthy vs. British (or rest of European men) ... even as they are bit unique via their genetype. I strongly think that Finns men simply eat more healthy food (= less very bad highly processed foods). Collecting/getting less harmful chemicals in their bodies.

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    I've commented about this before. Testosterone is overrated and even bad when too high. Many medical experts agree that testosterone levels in men are too high. You simply don't need much to function normally and even have kids. But too much can cause aggressive and oversexed tendencies. Keep it a a minimal level. Better for the human race.
    Saxonbrit, please elaborate.

    I'm genuinely interested by these claims, which I think are false.

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    Senior Member SaxonPagan's Avatar
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    I’m still bemused by the claim that testosterone levels need to be reduced, and I assume that the 2 members who thanked the post also hold this view so what am I missing

    Here is a list of medically-recognised symptoms caused by testosterone deficiency …

    Depression
    Insomnia
    Loss of libido / impotence
    Increased fat (large belly, man boobs, etc..)
    Loss of hair
    Reduced bone & muscle mass
    Reduction in testicle size & sperm quantity
    Hot flushes
    Fatigue
    Mood swings

    Who would want to create these sort of problems and, in the same process, emasculate the male population? I just don't see how you could possibly make a case for it

    Many medical experts agree that testosterone levels in men are too high
    Source? I've never heard a single medical expert say any such thing. You may be able to find some crank on the Internet who claims this (..you can find anything on the www!) but the overwhelming consensus - backed up by all the stats & data - is that they are too low and still falling!

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    It's all nonsense, but if for some reason or the other, you don't feel manly enough, just watch the video in my signature. You will be back to normal in no time
    My Favourite Germanic Tribal "Song"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wy-W-pYlds

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    Big "PHARMA" is out to rob your money the same way with all the other useless steroid drugs they parade in your face.

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    Senior Member SaxonPagan's Avatar
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    I see

    So you're saying that Big Pharma is putting out misleading information about a 'testosterone crisis'. That's an interesting new angle on this.

    You surely can't stand by post #4 though, where it was stated that we actually need lower testosterone levels? The symptoms of this for an individual are horrible, and multiplied throughout the whole of society it would be absolutely calamitous!

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