View Poll Results: What do you think of the (modern) influence of English on your national language and "languages

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  • It is unnatural/untraditional and a threat to its preservation.

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  • It is a natural occurrence and course of evolution.

    1 33.33%
  • Other/Explain.

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Thread: Influence on English on Your National Language?

  1. #1
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    Influence on English on Your National Language?

    Case study Norway:

    Norway universities criticised for overuse of English

    The Language Council of Norway (Språkrådet) says it is concerned about the amount of English used in courses at Norwegian universities and colleges.
    A number of classes at higher education institutions across the country are taught entirely in English, reports broadcaster NRK.

    The council said that using too much English could be damaging both during studies and for life after them.

    “We are particularly concerned for new students who find that almost their entire programme is in English. We are not convinced about the learning benefits, as it's not certain all students are good enough at English,” Ole Våge said to NRK.

    “It is a big problem if only English is used in education. The vast majority of people will be working in the Norwegian labour market afterwards,” he continued.

    Våge said that classes taught in English were beneficial but should not be prioritised at the expense of Norwegian.

    “It is completely natural to use both Norwegian and English. But we have seen that some classes are using solely English reading material,” he said.

    Norwegian students themselves are less critical about the amount of English used in studies, according to NRK's report.

    Mats Johansen Beldo of the Norwegian Student Organization said that English was not excessively used at universities and colleges in the Scandinavian country.

    “No, we students don't think it's a problem. Books in English are good and provide the academic input we need,” he told the broadcaster.

    University of Oslo Deputy Rector Gro Bjørnerud Mo said the Norwegian was the primary language of classes at the university, and that the amount of English actually used in classes varies between programmes.

    “We monitor closely language policies and the balance between English and other languages in our course catalogue,” she said.
    https://www.thelocal.no/20170816/nor...use-of-english

    English school threatens 'future of Norwegian language'

    An Oslo school's plan to provide classes in English has the Norwegian Language Society (Noregs Mållag) worried about the future of Norwegian.
    Manglerud School in Oslo is the first state-run primary school in the nation to teach in English. In a trial programme, the school's 80 students in the first through fourth grades will have all of their subjects taught in English, with the exception of a few hours each week that will focus on the Norwegian language.

    The English curriculum is open to all Oslo students, giving them a new state school option. Previously, the only English-language schools in the capital region were the private Oslo International School and Asker International School. At the former, attended by Princess Ingrid Alexandra, tuition is nearly 200,000 kroner per year.

    While students and teachers at Manglerud are excited about the new English teaching, the Norwegian Language Society said the move is a direct threat to Norway's two official languages, bokmål and nynorsk.

    “We are seeing a gradual development toward English becoming the workplace and school language in Norway. Most people in Norway would agree that this is not a development that we want,” the society's leader, Magne Aasbrenn, told broadcaster NRK.

    He said he doesn't want to see English and Norwegian “trade places” in their importance.

    “If we Norwegians want to have something to build our culture upon in the future, we can't just let our language slip between our fingers,” he said.

    Nina Wroldsen of Oslo Municipality said she sees no reason why Manglerud School's English curriculum should be a viewed as an existential threat to Norwegian. Instead, she told NRK that the school is filling “a need that hasn't been met before”.

    “It's time to think globally. The world has become smaller and more and more people have an international background,” she said.

    Oslo City Councilwoman Tone Tellevik Dahl agreed.

    “We want state-run schools to be the natural choice for all parents and children in Oslo. Since Oslo is a city with many international residents, it is very natural for us to offer English-language education for free,” Dahl told NRK.

    The majority of students at Manglerud School do not have Norwegian as a mother tongue, Wroldsen said.

    Aasbreen of the Norwegian Language Society isn't convinced.

    “Ultimately, this is about the future of the Norwegian language in Norway,” he said.
    https://www.thelocal.no/20160818/osl...egian-language

    A similar case in Germany, although here programs on TV are dubbed, and there are still people who don't speak much English. But English words are creeping their way into the German language nonetheless, thanks to technology, the Internet, etc. What about your situation? What do you think of the influence of English on your language? Threat to its preservation or natural evolution?

  2. #2
    a.k.a. Alpensun Ringenwald's Avatar
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    In Switzerland, English causes some concerns as well because many institutions use it as the second main language now, before the other national languages. As people more or less know, Switzerland is a multilingual country and the government managed to promote some exchanges to ensure "national cohesion" during the last century. Now in many places German and English are considered more important than German and French for example. And in the French-speaking part, English seems as important if not more important than German if you don't have any plan to work or move around in the country. It's a recent development. Even 15-20 years ago English was not widespread at all across Switzerland where people learned German and French "by default". Some people are worried it could strengthen the divides in the country. It's already not easy to form a country with three or four different languages, now we have to add English as well... Sure it's cool to learn all these languages at school but frankly, the more you add languages the more it's difficult to keep a good level for each of them due to time and dedication constrains.

    Swiss-Germans usually speak some French, but the French-speaking people of Switzerland usually don't have a good level of German (and don't know Swiss-German at all). So now that they have to learn English, I guess they have even less time to learn German. In addition, German and French have notoriously steeper learning curves than English and people tend to choose English if they have the choice.

    The funnest it's when German-speaking and French-speaking Swiss start to speak in English at the workplace in the middle of Switzerland. Now that a lot of people have learned some English, it's sometimes easier.

    Also at Universities they use English to get international students and recognition. It's often about statistical "ranking", founding and money (the more students they have, the more money they can ask). I've never hear about state-run schools teaching in English, though.

    Personally, I love the English language but prefer when it doesn't get mixed with other languages.

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    The German is full with borrowed English words (Handy, Internet), side by side the Hungarian is full with both English and German words, f.e. "fullra van a spájz" means "the pantry is full".

    "Remember that, even when those who move you be kings or men of power, your soul is in your keeping alone. When you stand before God, you cannot say, "But I was told by others to do thus,"or that virtue "was not convenient at the time." This will not suffice."
    /King Baldwin IV in the Kingdom of Heaven/

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    Senior Member Mööv's Avatar
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    The situation at the universities is very disturbing. Graduate programs thought in English are more and more popular everywhere. Also there's a trend to use English words everywhere even though a perfectly adequate native word exists. Worse yet, those then mutate and enter the main-stream language.
    Lieber tot als Sklave!

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