View Poll Results: German vs British Food - which is best?

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  • I prefer German food.

    12 63.16%
  • I prefer British food.

    3 15.79%
  • Both.

    2 10.53%
  • Neither.

    2 10.53%
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Thread: German vs British Food - Which is Best?

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    German vs British Food - Which is Best?

    When it comes down to it, German and British food really aren't that different. But there's nothing like a bit of friendly competition. So here is a comparison between 13 similar but oh-so-different pairs of dishes, to decide once and for all which cuisine is superior.

    Apfelstrudel vs Apple Pie



    Strudel is the national cake of Austria but it is also a firm favourite of the Germans. It is made with a lighter, thinner pastry than a pie and is rolled into a long shape before being baked without a tin. While you'd have to be mad to say no to a slice of either pie or strudel, the layering of pastry and fruit in a Strudel and the lower likelihood of a soggy bottom are what make this dessert superior to a simple apple pie.

    Germany 1 - 0 UK

    Schweinshaxe vs Pulled Pork



    Schweinshaxe is a pork knuckle, previously considered a 'poor man's dish' due to the less favourable cut it is made from. The meat is marinated for days before being roasted on a very low heat until it is almost falling off the bone. Pulled pork is similarly marinated and roasted for a long time but it is then shredded and often mixed with a BBQ sauce. Both ways of cooking pork are equally delicious, but there's something appealing about not having to worry about removing the meat from the bone which gives pulled pork the edge.

    Germany 1 - 1 UK

    Lebkuchen vs Gingerbread



    Due to the high likelihood of breaking a tooth on a gingerbread man, Germany wins this round. Lebkuchen tend to be softer in texture and also come with the added bonus of a chocolate or sugary shell which keeps them fresh.

    Germany 2 - 1 UK

    Weisswurst vs Haggis



    Weißwurst, a Bavarian delicacy, and haggis, a Scottish traditional dish, are both well-loved but also rather acquired tastes. Weißwurst is a veal sausage, or occasionally pork, often served with a pretzel. It gets its name from its pale colour which is a result of it being boiled rather than fried or grilled.

    Haggis is also boiled but is made of a sheep's 'pluck' (heart, liver and lungs), minced with onion, oats, suet, spices, salt and pepper, traditionally encased in the sheep's stomach and served with gravy, tatties and neeps (mashed potatoes and turnips). While neither are likely to win first prize in a beauty pageant, both are considered delicious. But haggis wins this round for its nutty texture and rich, savoury flavour.

    Germany 2 - 2 UK

    Stollen vs Fruitcake



    Although both contain dried fruit and both are served at Christmas time, Stollen is more like a sweet bread, while fruitcake, as the name suggests, is a cake. What's more, fruitcake is often "fed" for weeks with Madeira, sherry or brandy meaning it tends to be moister (and more alcoholic). For this reason, fruitcake beats Stollen.

    Germany 2 - 3 UK

    Bratkartoffeln vs Roast Potatoes

    This was a very close competition as both types of potato are the ultimate comfort food. Although the bacon and onion give the Bratkartoffeln the edge of decadence, nothing beats a perfectly cooked (crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside) roast potato.

    Germany 2 - 4 UK

    Sauerbraten mit Knödel vs Shephard's Pie



    With both these dishes, there are variations in the name based on what kind of meat they use. Badische Sauerbraten is made with beef, while Rheinische Sauerbraten is traditionally horse meat, however nowadays the dish is more commonly made with beef. Along similar lines, shepherd's pie is made with lamb mince and cottage pie uses beef.

    While shepherd's pie is a great comfort food, Sauerbraten is marinated for days making the meat incredibly tender and earning the German dish the point for this round.

    Germany 3 - 4 UK

    Deutsches Frühstück vs Fry Up



    Compared to the daintier habits of the French and Italians, Germany and the UK don't hold back when it comes to breakfast. A proper fry-up is delicious and a great hangover cure, but it does tend to leave you feeling like you need a shower and a nap afterwards. So with a huge range of spreads, cheeses, cold cuts, fruit, cereal and great breads, German breakfasts are the champions.

    Germany 4 - 4 UK

    Schnitzel mit Pommes vs Fish and Chips



    Although originally from Austria, it is safe to say Schnitzel has been widely adopted into German cuisine. Fish and chips, on the other hand, is the dish most stereotypically associated with the UK. Schnitzel is a thin cut of breaded pork or veal, served in a number of ways such as topped with mushrooms, onions or cheese. But nothing beats a simple piece of battered cod with mushy peas and chunky chips with salt and vinegar.

    Germany 4 - 5 UK

    Currywurst mit Pommes vs Bangers and Mash



    One is a classic street food, the other is the epitome of home cooking. The sausage in a Currywurst dish is sliced up and covered in a sweet curry ketchup and served with chips, usually sprinkled with paprika. In the end, both dishes are essentially sausage, potato and sauce, but the point has to go to the UK for that winning combination of sausage, mashed potato and gravy.

    Germany 4 - 6 UK

    Käsespätzle vs Cheese on Toast



    The simplicity of cheese on toast makes it a favourite for first thing in the morning or late at night but Käsespätzle (soft egg noodles served in the pan with melted cheese and fried onions) is even more delicious and wins this round.

    Germany 5 - 6 UK

    Paprika Chips vs Salt and Vinegar Crisps



    Paprika is the most prolific flavour of crisp in Germany. the UK, on the other hand, doesn't seem to have one flavour which they prefer above all others. But the salt and vinegar crisp brings in mind chip-shop chips with salt and malt vinegar and is, therefore, a truly traditional English flavour. The point has to go to paprika crisps for this round though. Germany has such a range of shapes and styles of paprika flavour crisps and it's not hard to see why, they taste great and they don't make your lips go white after eating them.

    Germany 6 - 6 UK

    Tie-Breaker Round

    Bratwurst vs Sausage Rolls



    Bratwurst are a matter of national pride in Germany. They are sold at imbisses and street food stalls throughout the year and range from tiny Nürnberger Bratwurst to the monstrous 1 metre Bratwurst you can sometimes find at Christmas markets and Oktoberfest.

    Sausage rolls are a common occurrence at most British bakeries but the day has not yet come where you can buy a 1 metre long sausage roll at your local Gregg's.

    While both are fine examples of traditional finger food, Bratwurst is usually only served in a standard white bread roll, meaning the humble sausage roll is the champion of this final round due to its delicious, flaky pastry coating.

    Which makes the final score: Germany 6 - 7 UK, meaning the UK wins (for once)!
    https://www.thelocal.de/20170926/ger...-which-is-best

    So, allegedly British food wins? Anyway, let's have our own poll. Which food do you prefer and why?

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    I voted German food.

    I had been to the UK as pupil on language learning vacation in the middle of the 80s,
    and I remember the British sweets horribly vinegared .

    The guest family had been Irish immigrants, brewing their own ale beer and wine.
    Probably I did got a false impresssion, but these were the impressions I gained at that time.
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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    I voted neither as we try to eat a modified Pacific Northwest/Mediterranean diet, but in truth I still eat a lot of the foods I grew up with, which were the worst combinations of both British and German foods.

    Foods I still eat from the list:

    Schweinshaxe/Pulled Pork: I like Schweinshaxe but go years with out eating it, then I get a craving, likewise pulled pork.

    Weisswurst/Haggis: the first, hard to find, so rare like pulled pork, as for haggis, it's only eaten on January 25 by dyed in the wool, amateur, Scots.

    Bratkartoffeln/Roast Potatoes: My grandmother and mother made both all the time, growing up I called Bratkartoffeln welfare hash, because it was made with the cheapest ingredients in the grocery, some times they'd throw an egg into it.

    Shephard's Pie: Not since a child.

    Fry Up: my typical breakfast is closer to the British version than the German, no beans or tomatoes, though.

    Schnitzel mit Pommes/Fish and Chips: both are served one or two times a year at chez Hammish.

    Currywurst mit Pommes/Bangers and Mash: Currywurst while visiting the big city of Seattle, Bangers and mash at home several times a year, I have to buy the bangers in another town.

    Käsespätzle/Cheese on Toast: Neither, grilled cheese sandwich, I broke a tooth on some Käsespätzle that the edges were cooked to well, haven't had it since.

    Bratwurst/Sausage Rolls: Both and often, sausage rolls are called Pigs in a Blanket around here and we make them with Bratwurst or Thüringer.

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    I've never been to Britain or Germany.

    Of all the foods listed, I've had:

    German: schnitzel (breaded thinly sliced veal cutlet with lots of lemon juice. I had this in an Austrian restaurant in NYC.)
    English: apple pie
    English: gingerbread cookies
    English: fruitcake

    I've had more English food than German food but the (Austrian) schnitzel with lemon wedges tasted so good it wins. I'll vote German food.

    p.s. I also love the (German) big soft pretzels. I can find them in the grocery store freezer section and warm them in the oven for a few minutes. I don't have a microwave.

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    For me Germany.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    For me Germany.
    Because ?

    It is or was actually easy to travel to Germany from Skandinavia across the Baltic Sea,
    so my guess is you had been to Germany a few times.


    By the way, would it be worth a thread comparing Swedish Smörgås with Danish Smørrebrød ?
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uwe Jens Lornsen View Post
    Because ?
    British food is very unhealthy & heavy (calories). But I would not go as far to call German's food the best either.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwe Jens Lornsen View Post
    It is or was actually easy to travel to Germany from Skandinavia across the Baltic Sea,
    so my guess is you had been to Germany a few times.
    Yes, I have been in Germany couple of times. North (Hamburg) and South (Munchen). And yes...via Denmark it is easy to travel Germany nowadays. Long Øresund bridge helps on that. One can drive his car in ferry (Gothenburg) and travel into Scotland too .... but that is expensive and takes quite a much time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwe Jens Lornsen View Post
    By the way, would it be worth a thread comparing Swedish Smörgås with Danish Smørrebrød ?
    Both are great! But as Finland's Swedish sandwiches are more like Smörgås so I always like to eat Danish Smørrebrøds (if possible). Plus I simply love shrimps!
    My father's family comes from southern Sweden and my Swedish granny from Skåne. I have ate world's best Smørrebrøds there (and not much/any meat balls or pytti panna). LOL.

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    German food of course.

    To me living in Midwest of America the dishes seem to be a mixture of both origins. Used to be when I lived in Southern Indiana German food was far more available, not so much now. Now, in central Kentucky it is mostly fried chicken and mashed potatoes.

    The biggest thing I miss is German style breads and sweets. Somehow it also seems the spices are different when I do find German dishes in the area, in Indiana it was more similar to Bavaria in ways of taste.

    I also feel very bloated when I have American and British food compared to German foods, perhaps it may just be the amount of starches or carbs. Also in Germany and growing up in a Germany family I think we ate more leaf greens and a different type of potato.

    Edit: Why did you have to show a picture of Weißwurst, something I cannot find fresh here and have to order online and they come in a jar...….I have to drive at least four hours to find them fresh.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    British food is very unhealthy & heavy (calories)
    Looking at the pictures of either cuisine in this thread was enough to nearly give me an heart attack. I guess in this respect, both German and British food can certainly be equally unhealthy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammish View Post
    Käsespätzle/Cheese on Toast: Neither, grilled cheese sandwich, I broke a tooth on some Käsespätzle that the edges were cooked to well, haven't had it since.
    Not sure how this could be possible, Spätzle(well, any pasta, really) should only get softer when you cook them longer, neither could they be too hard when fresh. The only thing I could think of, would be, that they were cooked not well enough.
    Unless you're meant you broke it on an edge of cheese, then you're making Kässpätzle entirely different over there to where they came from and grill them with cheese for ages in an oven. You should only layer hot Spätzle with cheese and perhaps put it into an oven on relatively low temperature for a short time. But usually that's not even necessary.


    As for the list, obviously, I'd go with German food. Except for the breakfast, I could have a full English one every day without any problems.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juthunge View Post
    Not sure how this could be possible
    I understand your confusion, standard Käsespätzle in this house is to make the regular Spätzlen with the sliding dumpling maker, let dry a bit, then mix with fried shallots, lots of cheese, a little cream, then bake.

    I left it in the oven a little long and the Spätzlen along the edges turned in to rocks.

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