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Thread: "Anglish - What if English Were 100% Germanic?"

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    "Anglish - What if English Were 100% Germanic?"

    Kind of interesting.

    Introduction
    "Anglish" is what one might call a constructed language. It is English minus many of the non-Germanic elements. There are and have been many different projects attempting to "purify" English of its non-Anglo-Saxon or non-Germanic influences. Note that Anglish, however, is distinctly NOT an attempt to construct what English might have become had history taken a different path. Instead, it is an attempt to revitalise the Germanic elements of our language. And most important of all, the underpinning idea of this, to make English CLEARER, to make English STRONGER. Note please this is not an attempt to arbitrarily remove non-Germanic elements from English; such linguistic fanaticism is not lusted after by me, and this project does not hanker for it.

    http://www.geocities.com/bajparry/Anglish.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ander-Saxon

    http://anglish.wikia.com/wiki/English_Wordbook

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    "Anglish - What if English Were 100% Germanic?"

    I've heard some members talk about trying to incorporate more Germanic words into their English language use and cut out the Latinate and other "foreign" influences. So I came across "Anglish" on Wikipedia...

    Anglish is a form of constrained writing in English in which words with Greek, Latin, and Romance roots are replaced by Germanic ones. (See etymology.)

    Sometimes this is achieved by use of synonyms and sometimes by neologisms. When merely consisting of synonyms, Anglish also functions as legitimate English.

    In 1966, Paul Jennings wrote a number of articles in Punch in Anglish, to commemorate the 900th anniversary of the Norman Conquest . He gave "a bow to William Barnes, the Dorset poet-philologist". The pieces included a sample of Shakespeare's writing as it might have been if William the Conqueror had never succeeded:[1]

    To be, or not to be: that is the ask-thing:
    is't higher-thinking in the brain to bear
    the slings and arrows of outrageous dooming
    or to take weapons 'gainst a sea of bothers
    and by againstwork end them?...
    (The fact that outrageous is actually of Romance origin—it is from Old French outrageux—seems to have escaped Jennings's attention. Additionally, mind is of Anglo-Saxon origin, so it had no need to change.)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglish

    I think this is an interesting idea, even if only to become more aware of English's Germanic roots and to increase your knowledge of the language. I think we should post English words that are Latinate (for example) and how we could say the same thing using only the Germanic words in English. Wikipedia gives some examples...

    Latinate - Germanic

    rage - anger
    ire - wrath
    inquire
    request - ask
    cognizant - aware
    commence - begin
    abdomen - belly
    corporal - bodily
    fraternal - brotherly
    purchase - buy
    infant - child
    arrive - come
    beef/cattle - cow
    mortal/fatal - deadly
    profound - deep
    soil - earth (gonna have to change "Blood and Soil" to "Blood and Earth"...)
    finish/complete - end
    paternal - fatherly
    sentiment/sensation - feeling
    family - kin
    ensue - follow
    prohibit - forbid
    predict - foretell
    liberty - freedom
    amicable - friendly
    assemble - gather
    present - gift
    provide - give
    deity - god
    joy/pleasure/delight - gladness
    proceed - go on
    quarter - fourth
    suppose/presume/surmise - guess
    audience - hearing
    detest - hate
    pagan - heathen
    assist - help
    canine - hound
    recognize - know
    depart - leave
    error - mistake
    novel/modern - new
    encounter - meet
    maternal - motherly
    nocturnal - nightly
    different - other
    perceive - see
    appear - seem
    close - shut
    timid - shy
    dormant - sleeping
    vision - sight
    pork - swine
    educate - teach
    pensive - thinking
    idea - thought
    city - town
    pronounce - utter
    salary - wage
    observe - watch
    desire - wish
    entire - whole
    prudent - wise
    comprehend - understand

    We could also post Latinate words that we want to try to figure out how to say only in Germanic English. I'm thinking of the following words at the moment...

    Arrest
    Associate
    Nation
    Voice
    Private
    Problem
    Beauty

    As you can tell Germanic words tend to be more down to earth and common whereas the Latinate words sound more intelligent...that should change . I also think words like "hither", "thither", "whither", and "yonder" should make a serious come back.

    I'm gonna dust off my Tolkien books and see what words he uses. Tolkien wrote most of his works specifically trying to use as few Latinate words as possible.

    Let's see what you got.

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    Agnition: acknowledgement of a fault.

    Albricias: reward for one who brings good tidings

    Alce: also

    Alconomye: alchemy.

    Alchochoden: the giver of life and years, the planet which bears rule in the principal places of an astrological figure, when a person is born.

    Alder-best: best of all

    Almandin: made of almond

    Almany: Germany

    Almicantarath: alchemical, meaning a circle drawn parallel to the horizon

    Almodza: alchemical term for tin

    Almute: astrological, a governing planet

    Altification: an alchemical term

    Amit: admit

    Avenant: graceful, beautiful, becoming

    Avenauntliche: beautifully

    Avisand: took up

    Ax'd out: said of an affianced couple upon the third reading of the bans, that they are ax'd out

    Axen: ashes; ie of erthe and axen, felle and bone = of earth and ashes, hill and bone



    Beth: be; be ye

    Ye braid of the miller's dog!: you're just like the miller's dog!

    Braist: break, ie "braist free o' the grave"

    Bouce-jane: a dish in cookery

    Yon bowdikite: contemptuous name for a mischievous child

    Bowdled like a hen: swelled out with rage



    Cazami: an old astronomical term, denoting the centre or middle of the sun. "The crystal shone like the cazami of the sun ..."

    Ce: place: "some tugge, sum drawe fro ce to ce."

    Clack-box: tongue

    Clavers: talk

    Copple-crowned: spoken of a boy with hair standing up on the crown of his head, of a bird with a tuft of feathers on its crown.



    Ding-thrift: a spendthrift. "The act of a ding-thrift widgeon."

    Dirl: a thrill of pain. "He felt a dirl of pain."

    Dizzard: a clown, a fool.

    Dutch-gleeked: drunken

    To durze out: spoken of corn so ripe that the grains fall out very easily.

    Dust: noise

    Dwyne: to faint, to pine, to disappear



    Eanling: a new-born lamb

    Earsh: a stubble-field

    Eft: again

    Erre: a sore, a pock-mark. "Stank and rotten erres ere ma."

    Erthedoune: an earthquake

    Erthing: burial

    Esclaunder: slander, reproach

    Evil-eye: an eye which charms



    A fals file: a worthless coward

    Farish on: advanced in years

    To fare foul with: to use someone badly

    A fantome fellow: a light-headed person

    Fear-babes: an empty terror, a bugbane set up to scare children

    Fermentation: in alchemy, the sixth process: the mutation of a substance into the nature of the ferment, after its primary qualities have been destroyed

    Fever-lurgan: the disease of idleness; ie "You have the fever-lurgan!"

    Fi (fico) : term of disgust and reproach, originally applied to anything that stank. This term is still used in Lincolnshire for the penis.

    Fighting farand: belligerent, ready for a fight

    By fine force: by absolute power or compulsion. Of fine force, of necessity

    Fire-flaught: lightning

    Fire-leven: lightning "...will find fire-flaught, fire-leven and erthemovinge!"

    Fiz a putain: son of a whore

    For-sette: to shut in, to close in.

    By frith and fell: by hedge and hill, a common phrase in old poetry



    Goff: oaf, fool

    Godphere: a godfather

    God's-sake: a child kept for God's sake, a foster child

    To go quit: to escape a danger

    Goathouse: a brothel.



    Harslet: a pig's chitterlings. "A haggise, a chitterling, a hog's harslet."

    Hart-of-grease: a fat hart

    Heyle: to hide

    Hubbleshow, hubble-te-shives: confusion; tumult

    Hucker-mucker: in secret; clandestinely

    Huckle-duckle: a loose woman

    Hurribob: a smart blow.



    Jamballs: rolls made with sweet bread

    Jolifant: to ride jolifant is to ride pillion, two on one horse

    Kimaya: a Persian herb which brings the dead back to life; ie, the philosopher's stone.



    "Liar liar lick dish!": proverbial address to a schoolyard liar.

    Lich: corpse

    Lichfoul: the night-raven

    "To lie with a latchet": to tell a monstrous lie.

    Loblolly: thick spoon meat or stew

    Lues: venereal disease



    Mucksen: muck-spout, a foul-mouthed person

    Mucksen up to the hucksen: dirty up to the knuckles

    Muck-suckle: a filthy untidy woman



    "Nettle in, dock out, dock rub nettle out!": an old country chant.

    To nick with nay: to deny



    Philosopher's egg, the name of a medicine for the pestilence.

    Prute: to wander aimlessly

    Putery: whoredom

    Pyke: to move or go off.



    Rake: to go, to rush



    Shinder: to shiver in pieces

    Shoe: to tread the shoes straight, to be upright in conduct. To tread the shoe awry, to fall away from virtue; "A woman to play false, enter a man more than she ought, or tread her shoe awry."

    Shore: a sewer. "She in plain terms unto the world doth tell / Whores are the hackneys which men ride to hell / And by comparisons she truly makes / a whore worse then a common shore or jakes."

    Shortening: anything put in flour to make the cakes short (ie crisp) - a man who is easily put in a passion is said to have had too much shortening in him.

    Shrap: a snare for birds

    Shred-pies: mince-pies

    Shrick: to shriek

    Shride: to hew or lop wood

    Shright: shrieked

    Sparple: to run wildly, in all directions



    Waving amain: waving a sword as a signal for the ships in a flotilla to strike their top-sails. Strike amain: to let the top-sails fall at their full run, not gently. Amain: all at once.

    As white as whale's bone: a very common simile

    Whorrell-winde: a whirlwind

    Whay-worms: pimples; ie "having wild whay-worms in their heads"

    Wide-where: widely, far and near. "What would you do with such a man, that thou hast sought so wide-where, in divers londys farre and nere."

    Widgeon: a silly fellow

    Wowl: to howl, to cry

    Wrack: wreck. "In the eight, short life, danger of death in travell. In the ninth, in peril to be slaine by theeves. In the tenth, imprisonment, wracke, condemnatio, and death by means of princes. In the eleventh, a thousand evills, and mischiefs for friends. In the twelfth, death in prison." Art of Astrology, 1673.

    Wreche: anger, wrath. "Dragons galle her wyne shal be / Of addres venym also, saith he / That may be heled with no leche / So violent thei are and ful of wreche."





    Hunting terminology:

    Beat counter: go backwards.

    Break field: to enter before the hunt.

    Go to vault: a hare's going to ground

    Hounds babble: giving tongue before they actually have the scent.

    Hunt at force: to run the game down with dogs (as opposed to shooting it).

    Hunt change: what hounds do, when they take a fresh scent and veer off the original quarry.

    Hunt counter: what hounds do, when they take a false scent

    Prick: a hare's track or footprints.

    Run riot: to run wild at the whole herd.

    Seat form: the lodgement of a hare.

    Sink: to lie down cunningly in hiding

    Skirt: to run round the sides, keeping close to cover

    Strain: when at full speed

    Tappish: to lurk or skulk.

    Trajon: to cross or double.

    Watch: to attend to the other hounds, taking advantage of their skill at following the scent.

    http://www.iras.ucalgary.ca/~volk/sylvia/OldEnglish.htm


    With Welsh, Irish and Scottish Gaelic being taught in schools, it should be about time that English children are taught Old English to instil a sense of pride in their Germanic tongue.

    I believe it would also help unite us in a common culture.
    "The only way to get smarter is to play a smarter opponent."

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    This is interesting, but honestly, how am I going to remember to use the Anglish words? [sigh]

    Anyway, some of the phrases on BeornWulfWer's list have me confused. For instance, Fiz a putain is old French as far as I can tell--same as modern French fils a putain. I seldom use that turn of phrase, but as far as I can tell it is Romance. It may be old English, but more likely Anglo-Norman English. Better to just use "whoreson" maybe? I know whore and son have a Germanic root.

    Still it is interesting stuff.

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    Yeah, I noticed that some of BeornWulfWer's post had Latinate words in it. Fermentation is certainly not Germanic! And I don't even know how I would properly use most of those sayings...or even how to pronounce some of them.

    As far as remembering goes, just start out slow and substitute one word at a time. It's sure to sharpen your mind.

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    Most of these Latinate vs. Germanic words actually have different "senses" in Speech. They give a different feeling than their similar cousins. i.e. pronounce and utter

    utter doesn't necessarily give one an image of pronounciation. you don't ask someone "can you utter this more clearly?", you ask someone "can you pronounce this more clearly?" because pronounce implies, perhaps the formation of words themselves rather than the utteration, the saying of the words.

    City and Town... Towns are usually considered smaller than cities and are also considered different in some countries under their planning or municipal legislations.

    While a desire and a wish are both "wants", a desire usually means something more bodily and easily realised ("I desire eggs for supper" [I want eggs for supper]) rather than something more abstract or difficult to realise ("I wish for eggs for supper" [I hope that I can have eggs for supper]).

    Novel/modern vs. New... to me both novel and modern are different words. Novel implies something is new, but with a sense of amazement or surprise. modern can mean that something is "new" but it can also mean that it "is not traditional", such as modern movements in design that date back 40 years plus. new can relate to anything and is much more utilitarian.

    Recognise and know are completely different words. When one recognises another or something, one does "know" it... but it is different in as much as they both are used in different contexts. If I see a friend on a street, I don't "know" him, I recognise him. Recognise sort of distinguishes things.

    Assemble vs. gather... similar senses, different words. You assemble furniture, you don't gather it. Vice versa, you gather flowers, you don't really assemble them.

    re: Fiz a putain, certainly French. ^^


    I don't see a problem with using adopted words into the English language, because if we really wanted to "Germanicise" the language, we'd have to take out a lot of useful words and we would have to change the basic grammar rules... in fact, why don't we just go back to using old English? :p
    People turn to poison as quick as lager turns to piss

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    English is what it is because of the romance & Celtic influence. All this is doing is swinging the bias from one group of conquerors to another, it's just awkward.

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    Well, to answer some questions its not about whose better - Latin or Germanic languages. I wouldn't purge the language of all non-Germanic elements. It's simply an exercise.

    @mischak: Pronounce as in "to announce". And novel and new have the same meaning. The word "question" and "ask-thing" don't have the exact same meaning either though. Much of these differences arise out of the way we use them now. They were much the same at one point. "Mansion" and "house" for example. The Normans come and they build big houses on manors. The Anglo-Saxons use the term that the French-speakers call them to denote that they are from the Normans..."Mansion" which is simply the French word for "house". The specificity is not something that is derived from the words originally but only over the passing of time and some historical contexts like the "mansion" example.

    Overall, I think the idea is just to see how different the English language would be if we only used the words that are Germanic. At any rate, I find it amusing and would like to see people use more of these words in replacement of the Latinate words more often.

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    I like the idea and I try to use English words wherever I can--both in writing and speaking.

    They just sound better to me--more rooted and grounded, common but expressive in their own, simple, sonorous right. There's an earthen beauty in their simplicity.

    Yes, I know there were some Latin derived words in my sentences above.

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    LOL! Whoops! Perhaps I should have re-checked the words being written down.

    My apologies, people.
    "The only way to get smarter is to play a smarter opponent."

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