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Thread: "Anglish - What if English Were 100% Germanic?"

  1. #11
    Senior Member Soldier of Wodann's Avatar
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    To Beornwerwulf, Almany for Germany is about 100 times for Latinized (and stupid to boot) than Germany is. Alemagne, which is used by the French, and Almany are both derived from the name "Alamanni", a tribal confederation in southern Germany. Mind you, that name was given to them by Romans, thinking they were Alans. eyes: I haven't the slightest idea why that came to reference all of Germany, but it does. Germania is apparently partially Gallic, which is likely linguistically closer to Germanic than is Latin. Hence, it is less foreign and does not sound utterly retarded.

    /rant

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  2. #12
    Senior Member Freydis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soten View Post
    @mischak:
    As far as I know my name isn't mischak. And as far as I know, she hasn't posted in this thread. And as far as I know, our avatars are completely different.

    But no big deal.

    Pronounce as in "to announce".
    Announce and utter are different in any case as well.

    And novel and new have the same meaning.
    Different feels to the words. When one writes, and one considers one's style, one uses certain words to evoke some sort of "feel".

    i.e. malodourous vs. smelly, gargantuan vs. big, miserable vs. sad, apologetic vs. sorry, appalling vs. disgusting ...

    each word has a different "feel" to it... unless you regard language as dead or clunky. it's subtle.

    Much of these differences arise out of the way we use them now.
    Language is dynamic and constantly evolving. Why should we live in the past of it?

    "Mansion" which is simply the French word for "house".
    Mansion isn't. It looks similar but sounds different: maison... if you want, in English sort of "phonetic" writing... "mae-szon" not "mann-shun".

    Overall, I think the idea is just to see how different the English language would be if we only used the words that are Germanic. At any rate, I find it amusing and would like to see people use more of these words in replacement of the Latinate words more often.
    I think only using Germanic words would be impossible in day to day life.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Yeah, I'm sorry for calling you mischak...I was only half-awake and the avatar images don't always load up properly for me.

    Again, it's not a matter of only using Germanic English words but of cutting out many of the superfluous Latinate words that we have acquired. And not only that but it just has a certain aesthetic quality that I enjoy.

    It's not necessarily living in the past. It's a constrainment of the words that are already in the English language. Sometimes it is good to use words like hither, thither, whither, and yonder though. Again, it has a certain aesthetic quality. Either you like it or you don't. In fact, I think it would be cool to pronounce (utter if you like ) words that start with "wh" as "hw". For example, instead of "wh-ale" it was originally pronounced "hw-ale".

    I understand the "feel" of words that you are trying to get across. But the Germanic words certainly have a "feel" of their own which can be best appreciated when in a thoroughly Germanic English sentence.

    "Maison" is where we get the English word "mansion" and "maison" only means "house" in French. But since the French Normans typically built very large houses this is where the different "feel" came into play in English.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Freydis's Avatar
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    What about superfluous words derived from other sources? If we used exclusively Germanic words, I would think day to day communication would be nearly impossible.

    Germanic words do have a feel, but it's nice to have a variety of words which one can choose from to give different feels in writing.

    I don't see a reason to restrict oneself.
    People turn to poison as quick as lager turns to piss

  5. #15
    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freydis View Post
    What about superfluous words derived from other sources? If we used exclusively Germanic words, I would think day to day communication would be nearly impossible.

    Germanic words do have a feel, but it's nice to have a variety of words which one can choose from to give different feels in writing.

    I don't see a reason to restrict oneself.
    Yes, I want to choose my words to have a certain feel and if I want a Germanic feel I better use Germanic words. J.R.R. Tolkien created a wonderful Germanic feel in his works through the use of Germanic English.

    Restricting yourself in this way, or replacing as many Latinate with Germanic words, can give you a better command of the English language. I think you could get away with communicating only in Germanic-derived English words. Much more so than if you tried to only communicate with Latinate English words. The structure of the English language and the simplest but most important words in our language are largely Germanic so it would be hard to say the least.

  6. #16
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    I hear English people and Germans using black slang words. This sounds so odd coming from them and really makes the point that this is substandard English. Before purging English of Latin words, how about eliminating black slang vocabulary first?

  7. #17
    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Here are some that I think are interesting.

    Simple - straightforward/fewfold (I really like "fewfold")
    Solstice - Sunwend
    Sociology - Kithlore
    Skeleton - frame/boneframe
    Nation - folkdom/kithdom/thede

  8. #18
    Sees all, knows all Chlodovech's Avatar
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    "Anglish - What if English Were 100% Germanic?"

    "If we were going to stand in darkness, best we stand in a darkness we had made ourselves.” ― Douglas Coupland, Shampoo Planet

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