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Thread: Volkstuemliche Musik

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    Volkstuemliche Musik

    Do you hear this kind of music in your country? It's a type of mainstream, modern or popular folk music-schlager mix, which differs a little bit from the traditional.

    Volkstümliche Musik (German for "folksy/traditional/popular music") is a modern popular derivation of the traditional Volksmusik genre of German-speaking countries in general and their Alpine regions in particular. Though it is often marketed as Volksmusik, it differs from traditional folk music in that it is commercially performed by celebrity singers and concentrates on newly created sentimental and cheerful feel-good compositions. Volkstümliche Musik is sometimes instrumental, but usually presented by one or especially two singers and is most popular amongst an adult audience in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and also in South Tyrol (Italy), Alsace (France), Netherlands, Flanders (Belgium), Slovenia and Silesia (Poland).

    Closely related to the German schlager genre, many titles stress a Heimat affect, being presented in regional dialects (typically Bavarian but also Upper Saxon, Low German or Rhinelandic) or colloquial language and invoke local and regional lifestyles and traditions, particularly dances. Brass and Alpine musical instruments, such as Alphorns, Zithers, acoustic guitars, violas and harmonicas are frequently featured, although most commercial productions nowadays employ drum machines and synthesizers. Yodeling is also common.

    From the early 1960s onwards, Volkstümliche Musik was conceived for commercial reasons as a counterweight to youth-oriented rock and pop music. The adjective volkstümlich refers to the borrowing of German and in particular "Alpine" folklore elements, connecting them to virtually all kinds of light dance and popular music of the 19th and early 20th centuries, from waltz to swing music. The large popularity of this music genre led to the development of volkstümliche record charts and various radio and television broadcasts with popular presenters like Carolin Reiber or Maria Hellwig.

    Volkstümliche Musik was influenced by Flower Power songs as well as by popular classical pieces during the 1970s and has been increasingly mingled with schlager music, promoted by successful singers like Heino serving as a model for performers like Die Flippers, Andy Borg or Kristina Bach. Its diffusion was further boosted by comprehensive TV broadcasting with some of the most popular programmes including Musikantenstadl (since 1981), Grand Prix der Volksmusik (1986–2010) and Lustige Musikanten with Marianne & Michael. Beside Volkstümliche Musik, these telecasts also feature big bands, country and even samba music.

    Modelled on immensely popular Musikantenstadl, since the early 1990s Volkstümliche Musik features strongly in numerous peak-time television broadcasts on German, Austrian and Swiss public TV networks including ARD, ZDF, ORF and Schweizer Fernsehen as well as several regional TV networks and local radio stations. Commercial broadcasters tend to stay clear of it because it is not very popular with the commercially desirable younger target groups up to 49 years of age, however, there are several cable and satellite telestations focusing on the genre.

    Not unlike schlager, Volkstümliche Musik is often belittled by younger or more sophisticated audiences as a massively commercialized product created for the lower strata of society, conveying an idyllic, reactionary, irrational conception. Therefore, the expression "volkstümliche Musik" (folksy/folk-like music) gets disrated in a very sarcastical manner sometimes by replacing the "-tümlich"(-like)-suffix by "-dümmlich", which virtually means featherbrained, turning it into "folk-featherbrained Music", e.g. dim-witted, daft or goony. Sociologist surveys confirm a predominant conservative attitude of the target group, which often feel vindicated in Volkstümliche Musik performances in a way of stress alleviation and escapism. In this perception, Volkstümliche Musik differs somewhat from its ancestor, the traditional folk music of the Alpine regions (Volksmusik), which continues to be performed by many local groups and orchestras in the area.

    The Volkstümliche Musik market is the largest music business in the German-speaking area. Due to the advanced age of the main target group, copyright infringement has not reached an considerable extent so far.

    Though the term is mainly unknown in the United Kingdom, volkstümliche Musik has attracted a fanbase there including BBC Radio Manchester commentator, Ian Cheeseman. A number of British singers have also been attracted to this style of music, even featuring on Musikantenstadl, such as Ross Anthony, Tony Christie and Roger Whittaker.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkst%C3%BCmliche_Musik

    Some examples:

    Hansi Hinterseer - Ich hab ein Herz für die Berge


    Maria & Margot Hellwig - Servus, Gruezi und Hallo


    Angela Wiedl - Das Lied der Heimat


    Feldberger Schwarzwaldmarie 2011


    Sonja Weissensteiner - Dann träum ich mir meine Berge zurück - 2003


    Alexandra Schmied - Happy Sommerzeit


    Lisa Seidl - Solche Augen lügen ned


    What is your view of this music? Too modern/commercial, or a means to raise mainstream interest in some Germanic themes?

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    For me, this kind of music is simply much too fake, stale and shallow, to be taken serious.

    If its goal or at least indirect aim, were "to raise mainstream interest in some Germanic themes", then it fails majorly at it. Because, in Germany, this kind of music is certainly only listened to by people over the age of 70, which are already traditional anyway and quite irrelevant for political change.

    A better way to attract people to traditional themes, would be via Neofolk or generally medieval themed groups(though not those of the ridiculous kind), in my opinion.

    For example:



    Jännerwein is a brilliant new Folkband from the breathtaking Salzburg countryside around the mount Untersberg, the myserious home of Sturmpercht. They play their very own style, a mix of oldschool Folkmusic and NeoFolk with some Martial rhythms, many Alpine-Folk and even some medieval elements.
    Jännerwein use many traditional alpine instruments, as harmonica, bells, marchial-drums, flutes, lyra and violins, but they also use a few electronics and they create a warm and heimish atmosphere in all their songs.
    Although they come from the same region and have a similar musical background as Sturmpercht, Jännerwein are somehow quite different, because they are more serious with their ancient, sad lyrics about holy (often christian) rituals and mysteries from the central european Alps.
    Another way would be via groups professionally singing real old folk songs in a non-ridiculous way:

    And the day they sold us out, Our hearts grew cold
    'Cause we were never asked, No brother, we were told!
    What do they know of Europe, Who only Europe know?



    Ancient DNA: List of All Studies analyzing DNA of Ancient Tribes and Ethnicities(post-2010)


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    It's better for youth to sing and listen to this kind music than to hip hop and rap, but it spreads the Bavarian stereotype, too much for my taste.

    I guess Bavarian regionalism has become politically correct, as the only expression of "acceptable" heritage.

    When you mix music with PCness, the result becomes this:

    Takeo Ischi - New Bibi Hendl (Chicken Yodeling)



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    I don't think it's "shallow".

    Young women learning to play the accordion and singing in their accent or dialect, it's more than you can expect from a woman nowadays.

    As long as it's not politically correct or plainly ridiculous (like the Japanese chicken man), I think the music is fine.

    Ok, their dress might be modern, but perhaps that's the intention, to be more modern than traditional folk music.

    This isn't music you hear on mainstream stations, and the article is correct when it says "commercial broadcasters tend to stay clear of it because it is not very popular with the commercially desirable younger target groups up to 49 years of age,".
    "Tradition doesn't mean holding on to the ashes, it means passing the torch."
    - Thomas Morus (1478-1535)

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    The Grand Prix der Volksmusik used to host such music. It is not traditional folk music but it is folk-like. Some of it tends more towards folksy topics (mountains, countryside, accordions, yodelling, costumes), other mixes the style with Schlager or newer motives and/or incorporates modern instruments (Heino, Dj Ötzi etc). While it is commercial I wouldn't say that it's too mainstream or popular with the youth and young adults. People who enjoy folk music and/or Schlager music may also enjoy this genre, and it's usually these kind of people who listen to it. There are radio and TV stations for this specific genre - Melodie TV, Gute Laune TV, Radio Heimatmelodie, many of them also play folk music.

    According to by Philip V. Bohlman in his book "Focus: Music, Nationalism, and the Making of a New Europe":

    On Saturday nights, from late spring to well into the summer, the television sets in taverns throughout Central Europe are turned to the "Grand Prix der Volksmusik". Even in many traditional taverns, where there has been live folk music entertainment during the week, those who have stopped by for an evening’s entertainment are watching the broadcast with intense interest. The “folk music” of the Grand Prix is neither rural nor urban — say, as one might find it in Bavaria or in Munich — but is cast in a popular vein, with electronic instruments, from guitars to keyboards and drumsets, replacing acoustic traditional instruments. More properly, the music broadcast in the competition belongs to the genres known as volkstümliche Musik (“folk-like music”), which consciously employ folk music but aim for a more popular, even rock-like sound.

    Paradoxically, both folk and rock components are emphasised as much as possible. Each of the ensembles appears in traditional clothing (Trachten), and most songs are performed in dialect, thus emphasizing the local content and style. Lest they seem too local, however, the performers modify their fashion, say, by combining more recent fashions with the Trachten, and they alter the sound of their performance by amplifying the bass and throwing in harmonies and improvisatory techniques with unmistakeable rock references. Repertory and performance style conspire to evoke the local and the international, and in the mix of these extremes is unmistakeable evidence of the nationalist potential of mediated folk and popular music.
    One could find some symbolism in the music, in that German-speaking minorities outside German-speaking countries intend to make a statement about their cultural and national heritage by resorting to this stye and competition. South Tyrol for example intends to make a historical statement about its national allegiance to Austria. Many winning entries come from cultural and dialect regions, which occasionally reflect political and administrative regions such as a province or a canton. South-Tyrol has often reached the final rounds (and even won the competition), along with Luxembourg and the Frisian areas stretching from northeastern Holland into southern Denmark. So one could say it draws some attention to identity, however this is nothing restricted to the genre, much of the same can be said about traditional folk music, neofolk, viking folk/metal etc.

    Examples:

    Original Naabtal Duo - Patrona Bavariae


    Alpentrio Tirol - Hast a Bisserl Zeit für mi


    Zellberg Buam - Tirolerzeit


    Oesch's die Dritten - Ku-Ku-Jodel


    Franzl Lang - Kufsteiner Lied

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    Last edited by +Suomut+; Monday, April 3rd, 2017 at 03:12 PM. Reason: ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by +Suomut+ View Post
    The only way I can hear this genre of music is via the internet , so count yourself blessed. Even if I visit the main, good German restaurant in my/our area (owned by a European-German...now also a U. S. citizen), they don't play Volksmusik like this in there (regardless of sub-genre) except on special occasions, sad. Anyway again, consider yourself blessed.
    Indeed, although this music isn't part of the mainstream where I live either... Apart from one local channel for Saxons and some German radio channels, it's played in two German restaurants, but one of them stopped playing it so often lately because the clientele has become younger. It's usually older generations who listen to it.

    What you've shared is fine by me, I for one don't have any problem with it and these. It is (they are) just a sub-genre that I can't listen to almost constantly, unlike some of the other sub-genres within this overall genre (i. e. German-specific 'Volksmusik') that I love and can listen to almost constantly. When one considers all the total-garbage-crap-music that plays in and on the 'airwaves' these days...especially 90%+ of 'rap' music (a veritable plague upon the Human species )...it's innocuous and worthy of consuming, especially if it brings happiness to one's life.
    Yes, you are right. Despite some of the critizism towards the music, I think the genre is still pretty good to listen to and I would feel elated if peoples of German ethnicity my age took a bigger interest in such songs rather than what is listened to these days (Ariana Grande, Rihanna, Brian Mars etc., not to mention the rap and hip hop...)

    I like neofolk and folk metal as well, but these songs have a different kind of tempo, they bring a more positive, happy mood.

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    I started watching videos like this because they come up in my suggestions after watching Bavarian Folk music videos. I make no apologies I'm a man and some of the girls are very pretty and have good voices.

    I especially like Melanie from Oesch's die Dritten, she has a awesome voice and is very pretty.

    Oesch's die Dritten "Was säge äch de d'Lüt" & "Itz gani eifach" (Offizielles Video)


    Does this mean I'm getting old?
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

  10. #10

    Arrow Stefanie Hertel (Present & Past)

    @Siebenbürgerin: along the lines of this thread, let's compare Stefanie Hertel nowadays compared to the/her past:
    "Und weil's so schön war..."

    ...to...--v
    "Ich wünsch' mir..."

    ...I can listen to the bottom one repetitively far, far longer than I can the top one, because the top one is more along the lines of the sub-genre you've largely displayed in your first post, and I can't listen to that kind of stuff as long as I can Stefanie's bottom song here, because the bottom is more my 'thing' and it's older-style, more traditional, old(er) fashioned, etc. The top is more that more modern 'dance-club' style that I don't miss when I'm not hearing it...but it's OK esp. given what it's designed/written for: largely for dancing in a disco to, which I NEVER!! do, lol.

    I AM! a big Stefanie fan, but I'll take the 'old/young Stefanie' OVER! the 'Stefanie now' any day...the 'older/younger' one being more my 'speed.' Also and this has nothing to do with music, I was quickly drawn to Stef. when I first learned of her and how she looked back when she was young, because she looked a lot like myself (or I looked a lot like here) back when I was young, especially facially. Back as Kinder, she and I could easily have passed for brother & sister. Funny how that is...it's really a psychological thing for me with that and her. Us as adults, though, we look little a like. Back in 1985 (bottom vid.) when I was still a teenager I would have been happy to go see the girl perform...nowadays I'd be less interested in seeing her live mainly because of the sub-genre she's doing nowadays. (:-\

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