"However, the presented data reveal as well a certain decrease of the cranial capacity which is manifested already after the older subphase of the Upper Paleolithic period (i.e.beginning from the Solutrean-Magdalenian times) what is prolonged in still more recent series from the Milicz cemetery (800 A.D.) in Poland, while the remaining traits generally change in the same direction as before that time. (Wiercinski, Andrzej (1979) Has the brain size decreased since the upper paleolithic. Bulletins et memoires 13 (6) (4): pp. 420)


"A) in a considerable majority of cases, there is manifested the process of a gradual decrease of the size of neurocranium which began already in the younger subphase of the Upper Paleolithic period (British Isles, Iberian Peninsula, Italia and Sardinia, France, Germany, Scandinavian countries, Lettland, Tcheckoslovakia, Poland, Ukraine, Middle Dniepr Bassin, Lower Volgha Bassin, Southern Siberia, Transbaikal area, Northern China, Japan, India, Australia and Black Africa) and it is characterised by a very few fluctuations and, by a tendency towards stabilisation in the contemporaneity;
B) this process proceeds in different environments, in different racial varieties, in hunting-gathering or agricultural, as well as, in urbanizing societies, which may brachycephalize or not;
C) there appeared only 3 notable exceptions from this rule, i.e. Egypt with slight fluctuations and so, without clear trend and , Northern Siberia and Transbaikal area where the opposite trend is visible, i.e. towards an increase of the size of neurocranium." (Wiercinski, Andrzej (1979) Has the brain size decreased since the upper paleolithic. Bulletins et memoires 13 (6) (4): pp. 422)


"The shrinking of human dentition is also curious. The teeth of our ancestors began a steady decline about 100,000 years ago. Decreasing about 1 percent every 2,000 years, and recently 1 percent every 1,000 years, they have shrunk to about half their previous size."(Wesson, Robert (1991) Beyond Natural Selection. MIT Press: Cambridge p. 233)


"Between the time represented at Skhul and Qafzeh (30,000 - 35,000 BP) and the time represented at Kebara C (around 15,000 BP) there was a decrease in robustness but no change can be demonstrated in the average human diet." (Schoeninger, Margaret (1982) Diet and evolution of modern human form in the middle east. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 58(1): pp. 48)


The large increase in this ratio between the early Epipaleolithic level site (Kebara C) and the two late Epipaleolithic level sites (Kebara B and el-Wad) suggests that the major dietary shift occurred some 15,000 years after the major morphological shift had been completed. ... Both the results of the trace element analysis and the archeological record, therefore, indicate that the change in subsistence activities related to dietary components occurred long after the change in skeletal robustness from archaic to modern Homo sapiens. In fact, the shift toward greater dependence on plant products, occurred some 15,000 years after the first appearance of fully modern Homo sapiens." (Schoeninger, Margaret (1982) Diet and evolution of modern human form in the middle east. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 58(1): pp. 49)


"The almost universal distribution of the trend towards a gradual decrease of the brain size after the Perigord-Aurgnacian subphase seems to suggest that it may belong to the category of changes: new anagenetic or ecosensitive. In the first case, i.e. a new anagenetic evolutionary trend, a complete reversal of the direction of natural selection should be assumed. Otherwise speaking, the small brained individuals have been favoured against the big-brained ones. However, such an explanation can not be easily accepted since it would be in distinct contradiction with the following facts: the cultural evolution has been proceeding non stop and is even conspicuously accelerated in the last millennias; there is a lack of dependence on the mode of life which might include the possible selective agents. (Wiercinski, Andrzej (1979) Has the brain size decreased since the upper paleolithic. Bulletins et memoires 13 (6) (4): pp. 425)

"the decrease in brain size occurs also among hunting-gathering Australians..." (Wiercinski, Andrzej (1979) Has the brain size decreased since the upper paleolithic. Bulletins et memoires 13 (6) (4): pp. 426)


"Egypt with established and rather stabilised agricultural economy, since the Predynastic times, demonstrates also stabilisation of the brain size, with very slight fluctuations..." (Wiercinski, Andrzej (1979) Has the brain size decreased since the upper paleolithic. Bulletins et memoires 13 (6) (4): pp. 426)