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Thread: Denmark's Immigration Policy: Danes Should Not Become the Minority in Denmark

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    Denmark Sets a Target of Zero Asylum Seeker Applications to Protect ‘Social Cohesion’



    • Danish PM Mette Frederiksen said country will drive down asylum applications
    • The country is already seeing the lowest number of asylum requests since 1998
    • Denmark's record low applications this year is partly explained by pandemic


    Denmark’s prime minister today set a target to drive down the country’s asylum seeker applications to zero to protect ‘social cohesion’.

    The country is already seeing the lowest number of asylum seekers since 1998, with 1,547 people applying in 2020. By comparison, applications in the UK were 32,423 last year.

    ‘We cannot promise zero asylum seekers, but we can set up that vision,’ Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said in parliament.

    ‘We need to be careful that not too many people come to our country, otherwise our social cohesion cannot exist.’

    The low number of applications last year can be partly explained by the Covid-19 pandemic but it is less than a tenth of the figure in 2015, at the height of the refugee crisis in Europe.

    Denmark’s figure of 21,300 applications in 2015 was only about an eighth of the number in neighbouring Sweden.

    Denmark, a country of 5.8 million inhabitants, makes no secret of its desire to discourage people from seeking refuge.

    Immigration Minister Mattias Tesfaye said yesterday the country’s strict immigration policies were to be thanked for the low number of applications.

    ‘Very many of those who come here have no need at all for protection,’ he also claimed in the statement.

    Among the country’s strict policies was the planned deportations of Syrian refugees announced in 2019.

    After an assessment by the Danish Immigration Service, the government ruled that some migrants could be sent back to Damascus. They concluded the capital, and its surrounds, were no longer dangerous enough for asylum to be automatically granted.

    Asylum was rescinded for some Syrian refugees. Deportations, however, were limited due to a reluctance on the part of the Danish government to negotiate with the Assad regime.

    Tesfaye said that similar repatriation difficulties for refused asylum seekers made it all-the-more important to curb the number of arrivals.

    ‘Fewer asylum seekers means, all other things being equal, lower spending on processing applications, accommodation and deportation of those whose claims for asylum are rejected.

    ‘We can spend that money on more welfare at home and on persecuted people in local regions [near to conflict zones, ed.],’ he said.

    In 2017, as leader of the Social Democrats Frederiksen presented a plan to send all ‘non-Western’ migrants back to so-called reception centres in North Africa and the Middle East.

    In September, Copenhagen appointed an ambassador for migration to speed up the creation of one or more migrant camps outside the European Union as part a new European asylum system.

    The figures announced yesterday aren’t a true reflection of the actual number of asylum seekers to arrive in Denmark. They include individuals who travelled without asylum and some who were approved, for reasons including family reunification.

    DailyMail

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    Denmark will limit the number of 'non-Western' residents in neighbourhoods to 30% to 'reduce the risk of religious and cultural parallel societies'



    • The Social Democratic government made the announcement on Wednesday
    • Each neighbourhood will be limited to a maximum of 30 percent within 10 years if the legislation passes, which it is expected to, after being discussed by parties
    • Data shows 11 percent of Denmark's 5.8 million inhabitants are of foreign origin
    • Of this group, 58 percent are from a country considered 'non-Western'
    • Denmark has for years had one of Europe's most restrictive immigration policies


    Denmark will limit the number of 'non-Western' residents in neighbourhoods to up to 30 percent to 'reduce the risk of religious and cultural parallel societies'.

    The Social Democratic government made the announcement on Wednesday, and scrapped the controversial term 'ghetto' in its proposed legislation when referring to the country's 'disadvantaged neighbourhoods'.

    In the bill - a review of existing legislation on combating parallel societies - the interior ministry proposed that the share of residents of 'non-Western' origin in each neighbourhood be limited to a maximum of 30 percent within 10 years.

    Denmark has for years had one of Europe's most restrictive immigration policies, which Social Democratic Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen has continued since coming to power in June 2019 amid growing opposition from the right.

    According to Interior Minister Kaare Dybvad Bek, too many non-Western foreigners in one area 'increases the risk of an emergence of religious and cultural parallel societies,' he said in a statement.

    He said however that the term 'ghetto', used to designate disadvantaged neighbourhoods, would be removed from the new legislation.

    'The term ghetto is misleading... I think it contributes to eclipsing the large amount of work that needs doing in these neighbourhoods,' he said.

    Until now, the term was used legally to designate any neighbourhood of more than 1,000 people where more than half were of 'non-Western' origin, and which met at least two of four criteria.

    The four criteria are: more than 40 percent of residents are unemployed; more than 60 percent of 39-50 year-olds do not have an upper secondary education; crime rates three times higher than the national average; residents have a gross income 55 percent lower than the regional average.

    Fifteen Danish neighbourhoods currently fall into this category, and 25 others are considered 'at risk'. The list is updated each December.

    In these neighbourhoods, misdemeanours carry double the legal penalties in place elsewhere, and daycare is mandatory for all children over the age of one or family allowances are withdrawn.

    The existing legislation also calls for council homes in these areas to be reduced to 40 percent of available housing by 2030.

    The bill will be discussed by Danish political parties and is expected to pass, though no date has been set for the vote.

    According to Statistics Denmark, 11 percent of Denmark's 5.8 million inhabitants are of foreign origin, of whom 58 percent are from a country considered 'non-Western'.

    Earlier this month, Denmark became the first European nation to tell Syrian migrants they must return to their home country, saying it is now safe for them there.

    The Scandinavian nation stripped 94 Syrian refugees of their residency permits after it determined Damascus and the surrounding area as being safe.

    Migrants will be sent to deportation camps, but will not be forced to leave. But rights groups say the government is trying to give migrants no other option than to return to Syria on their own accord.

    Mattias Tesfaye, Denmark's immigration minister, said last month that the country had been 'open and honest from the start' with refugees coming from Syria.

    'We have made it clear to the Syrian refugees that their residence permit is temporary. It can be withdrawn if protection is no longer needed,' he said, according to The Daily Telegraph.

    His comments came as Denmark extended the parts on Syria considered safe for people to return, to include the southern Rif Dimashq Governorate.

    'We must give people protection for as long as it is needed. But when conditions in the home country improve, a former refugee should return home and re-establish a life there,' he said.

    Denmark's ruling centre-Left Social Democratic Party has taken a fierce anti-immigration stance in an effort to fend off challenges from parties on the Right.

    Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen has promised to target 'zero' asylum seekers applying for residence in the country.

    DailyMail

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    Danish MPs agree to send asylum seekers outside Europe



    Denmark's parliament on Thursday adopted a law enabling it to open asylum reception centres outside Europe where applicants would live while their case is processed, with the host country also taking them in if granted asylum.

    Known for having one of Europe’s harshest stances on immigration, the wealthy Scandinavian country aims to deter migrants from coming to Denmark at all.

    Despite criticism from humanitarian organisations and some leftwing parties, the bill, proposed by Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen’s Social Democrats, was adopted by 70 votes to 24.

    Under the law, asylum seekers would have to submit an application in person at the Danish border and then be flown to an asylum centre outside Europe while their application is being processed by the host country.

    If the application is approved and the person is granted refugee status, he or she would be given the right to live in the host country, but not in Denmark.

    If it is rejected, the migrant would have to leave the host country. No country has agreed to collaborate with Denmark yet, but the government says it is in talks with five to 10 countries, without identifying them.

    Danish media have mentioned Egypt, Eritrea and Ethiopia as possibilities. Denmark is meanwhile known to be in talks with Rwanda.

    The two have signed a memorandum of understanding on asylum and migration cooperation, though the document doesn’t specifically cover external asylum processing.

    The UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, criticised the law as “contrary to the principles of international refugee cooperation.”

    “By initiating such a drastic and restrictive change in Danish refugee legislation, Denmark risks starting a domino effect, where other countries in Europe and in neighbouring regions will also explore the possibility of limiting the protection of refugees on their soil,” UNHCR’s representative in the Nordic and Baltic countries, Henrik Nordentoft, told news agency Ritzau.

    Denmark has repeatedly made headlines in recent years with its anti-immigration policies, including its official “zero refugees” target, its withdrawal of residence permits from Syrians now that it deems parts of the war-torn country safe, and its crackdown on Danish “ghettos” in a bid to reduce the number of “non-Western” residents.

    Thelocal.dk

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  5. #244

    Denmark Cracks Down on Mass Migration "The Current Asylum System Has Failed"


    Denmark Cracks Down on Mass Migration

    "The Current Asylum System Has Failed"





    • The Danish Parliament has passed a new law that will allow the government to deport asylum seekers to countries outside of the European Union to have their cases considered abroad. The legislation is widely seen as a first step toward moving the country's asylum screening process beyond Danish borders.
    • "Denmark is committed to finding new and sustainable solutions to the present migration and refugee challenges that affect countries of origin, transit and destination. The current asylum system is unfair and unethical by incentivizing children, women and men to embark on dangerous journeys along the migratory routes, while human traffickers earn fortunes." — Danish Immigration Minister Mattias Tesfaye.
    • "Gang crime in no way belongs in Denmark. When foreigners or persons to whom we in Denmark have granted Danish citizenship participate in the gangs' ruthless crime, it is a fundamental expression of contempt for the society of which they are a part. Therefore, it is good news that Parliament has today passed the government's bill to provide the opportunity to revoke citizenship in the event of serious gang crime to the serious detriment of the state's vital interests. It is a goal for the government to ensure that Danes can be safe in their everyday lives." — Minister of Justice Nick Hćkkerup.
    • The Danish Parliament approved a first-ever Repatriation Law which authorizes the government to deport failed asylum seekers and other migrants illegally in the country.... The Danish government tightened citizenship rules.... The Danish government announced a package of new proposals aimed at fighting "religious and cultural parallel societies" in Denmark.... The Danish Parliament approved a new law that bans foreign governments from financing mosques in Denmark.... The Danish Parliament approved a ban on Islamic full-face veils in public spaces.
    • "We hope that people will stop seeking asylum in Denmark." — MP Rasmus Stoklund.







    The Danish Parliament has passed a new law that will allow the government to deport asylum seekers to countries outside of the European Union to have their cases considered abroad. The legislation is widely seen as a first step toward moving the country's asylum screening process beyond Danish borders. Pictured: A Danish checkpoint on the border with Germany, near Padborg, on January 6, 2016.


    The Danish Parliament has passed a new law that will allow the government to deport asylum seekers to countries outside of the European Union to have their cases considered abroad. The legislation is widely seen as a first step toward moving the country's asylum screening process beyond Danish borders.



    The law, proposed by the Social Democrat-led government, is aimed at discouraging frivolous asylum applications. It has been greeted with fury by those who favor mass migration, presumably out of fear that other EU countries may now follow Denmark's lead.


    Denmark, which already has some of the most restrictive immigration policies in Europe, is at the vanguard of European efforts to preserve local traditions and values in the face of mass migration, runaway multiculturalism, and the systematic encroachment of political Islam.


    An amendment to the Aliens Act,
    approved on June 3 by 70 votes to 24, authorizes the government to enter into agreements with non-EU countries (so-called third countries) to allow it to "transfer third-country nationals and stateless persons who apply for asylum in Denmark to the third country in question for the purpose of substantive processing of asylum applications."



    Danish Immigration Minister Mattias Tesfaye, a Social Democrat and the son of an Ethiopian immigrant, told the Financial Times that Denmark had "identified a handful of countries," mostly in Africa, that might be open to hosting migrant reception centers.


    In April, Tesfaye signed a "Memorandum of Understanding" with Rwanda regarding "cooperation on asylum and migration issues." The document raised speculation that Denmark wants to transfer migrants to the East African country, which has a tradition of hosting refugees. The memorandum spelled out the Danish government's long-term objective:

    "Denmark is committed to finding new and sustainable solutions to the present migration and refugee challenges that affect countries of origin, transit and destination. The current asylum system is unfair and unethical by incentivizing children, women and men to embark on dangerous journeys along the migratory routes, while human traffickers earn fortunes.


    "There is a need to finding new ways of addressing the migration challenges by promoting a fairer and more humane asylum system based on a comprehensive approach. This includes addressing the root causes of irregular migration, providing more and better protection of refugees in the regions of conflict and increasing assistance to host nations, countries of origin and transit — along the migratory routes — in order to improve border management, strengthen asylum systems and fight human smuggling.



    "It is also the vision of the Danish Government that the processing of asylum applications should take place outside of the EU in order to break the negative incentive structure of the present asylum system."

    Advocates of mass migration have criticized Denmark's new law. The European Commission, the EU's powerful administrative arm, said that it had "fundamental concerns" about deporting asylum seekers to countries outside of Europe:

    "External processing of asylum claims raises fundamental questions about both the access to asylum procedures and effective access to protection. It is not possible under existing EU rules or proposals under the new pact for migration and asylum."

    Others have accused Denmark of seeking to "export" the asylum process. Gillian Triggs, assistant high commissioner of UNHCR, the United Nations' refugee agency, warned that "such practices undermine the rights of those seeking safety and protection, demonize and punish them and may put their lives at risk."



    UNHCR global spokesperson Shabia Mantoo added that the agency "remains firmly opposed to national initiatives that forcibly transfer asylum-seekers to other countries and undermine the principles of international refugee protection."



    In an interview with Euronews, Nikolas Feith Tan, a senior researcher at the Danish Institute for Human Rights, said that Denmark's plan to house asylum seekers outside its borders represents "a fundamental shift" in how the international protection system functions:

    "Up until now, refugee protection has been primarily territorial. If you reach Denmark, then Denmark is responsible for both assessing whether you are a refugee or not, and if you are a refugee, then for granting you protection. The new legislation shifts that idea of territorial asylum."

    Tan said that transferring asylum seekers abroad in principle does not violate international law, but that the government should still expect be sued in Danish courts and at the European Court of Human Rights.



    Tesfaye said that "a key aim" was to reduce the number of "spontaneous" asylum seekers to Denmark:

    "The current asylum system has failed. It is inefficient and unfair. Children, women and men are drowning in the Mediterranean or are abused along the migratory routes, while human traffickers earn fortunes."


    Other Measures to Curb Mass Migration


    Since assuming power in June 2019, the government of Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen has introduced a raft of measures aimed at curbing mass migration. The measures build on those implemented by previous governments.



    June 3, 2021. The Danish Parliament approvedby 78 votes to 16 a new law that authorizes the government to revoke Danish citizenship from immigrants who are members of criminal gangs. The law is aimed at tackling a surge in migration-linked violent crime. The amendment to the Citizenship Actallows for the "denial of citizenship for certain forms of serious gang crimes considered detrimental to the vital interests of the State." The law applies only to dual nationals and not to gang members who, by losing their Danish citizenship, would become stateless. The new law, which is not retroactive, enters into force on July 1, 2021.

    Minister of Justice Nick Hćkkerup said:

    "Gang crime in no way belongs in Denmark. When foreigners or persons to whom we in Denmark have granted Danish citizenship participate in the gangs' ruthless crime, it is a fundamental expression of contempt for the society of which they are a part. Therefore, it is good news that Parliament has today passed the government's bill to provide the opportunity to revoke citizenship in the event of serious gang crime to the serious detriment of the state's vital interests. It is a goal for the government to ensure that Danes can be safe in their everyday lives. When the gangs challenge that security, it must have noticeable consequences."

    May 26, 2021. The Danish Parliament approved by 67 votes to 26 a first-ever Repatriation Law which authorizes the government to deport failed asylum seekers and other migrants illegally in the country. The law allows the government to monitor foreigners' mobile phones in order to more easily identify and deport them.


    The law was approved amid reportsthat migrants who had been paid between 100,000 and 225,000 Danish kroner ($16,000 and $37,000) by the Danish government to leave the country took the money but then disappeared without actually leaving. Others took the money and left the country and later returned.



    Minister for Foreign Affairs and Integration Mattias Tesfaye said:

    "We have too many foreigners without legal residence in Denmark who do not return home. It is unsustainable. Both for the individual and for the Danish state, which must spend money on accommodating these people.... The penalties have been increased for those with deportation orders who do not comply with their control obligations. Now we have taken the next step towards a coherent repatriation policy. It is intended to help more foreigners without legal residence to return to their home countries. I am glad that there is broad support for this in the parliament."

    May 6, 2021. The Danish government tightenedcitizenship rules. In future, individuals with criminal records will be excluded from obtaining Danish citizenship. Individuals found guilty of committing immigration or social security fraud must wait for six years for their citizenship application to be considered. The new rules also introduced an employment requirement. Applicants must have been in full-time employment or have been self-employed for at least three years and six months within the previous four years. Five questions about Danish values ​​have been added to the citizenship test. Applicants will be required to correctly answer four out of the five questions. "There is great agreement among the parties to the agreement that it is crucial that an applicant has adopted Danish values," the government saidin a statement.



    Minister for Foreign Affairs and Integration Mattias Tesfaye said:

    "We have to draw a line in the sand. People who have been imprisoned must not have Danish citizenship."

    Spokesman for the Liberal Party, Morten Dahlin, added:

    "Danish citizenship is a gift to be earned. Therefore, we must make an effort when handing out passports. Those we welcome in the Danish family must have embraced Denmark and stayed on the right side of the law. That is why we in the Liberal Party are happy that there is now a greater focus on Danish values ​​and that there is a crackdown on foreigners who have committed crimes. These have been important demands on our part."

    Conservative Rapporteur Marcus Knuth said:

    "The Conservatives have been fighting for new rules for Danish citizenship for over a year. It is especially important to us that criminal foreigners with a prison sentence can never apply for Danish citizenship, and it is important to us that there is now an employment requirement, so one must now have worked the last 3˝ out of four years. We also worked on a ceiling on the number of citizenships for applicants outside the EU and the Nordic countries, but unfortunately the government would not. In return, we now have an audit provision, so the government shall call for discussions if there is a significant increase in the number of applicants."

    Liberal Alliance Rapporteur Henrik Dahl said:

    "I am first and foremost happy that, as something new, we demand that new citizens have worked for some years before they can get a Danish passport. It is only reasonable that one has contributed to the Danish economy before one gets full rights in Denmark."


    March 17, 2021. The Danish government announced a package of new proposals aimed at fighting "religious and cultural parallel societies" in Denmark. A cornerstone of the plan includes capping the percentage of "non-Western" immigrants and their descendants dwelling in any given residential neighborhood. The aim is to preserve social cohesion in the country by encouraging integration and discouraging ethnic and social self-segregation.



    March 9, 2021. The Danish Parliament approved a new law that bans foreign governments from financing mosques in Denmark. The measure is aimed at preventing Muslim countries, particularly Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Turkey, from promoting Islamic extremism in Danish mosques and prayer facilities.



    March 9, 2021. The Danish Parliament approvedby 96 votes to 0 a new law that bans religious marriages of minors and forced marriages. Islamic preachers and others who conduct such marriages now face up to two years in prison and deportation from Denmark. The same goes for parents who allow their children enter into a Sharia marriage. The penalty for detaining a person in a forced marriage was increased to four years in prison. The law also authorizes the government to withdraw the passports of children if there is reason to believe that they are being sent abroad to be married, regardless of whether the marriage is legally valid. The law bans the use of Islamic nikah marriage contracts which often make it difficult for Muslim women to seek a divorce. The new law entered into force on March 15, 2021.



    February 18, 2021. The Danish governmentannounced that it would review the residency status of 350 Syrian migrants from Syria. The move came after the Danish Refugee Board decidedthat the Rif Damascus region of Syria is now safe and that there is no longer a basis for granting or extending temporary residence permits.



    Minister for Foreign Affairs and Integration Mattias Tesfaye said:

    "Denmark has been open and honest from day one. We have made it clear to the Syrian refugees that their residence permit is temporary. It can be withdrawn if protection is no longer needed. With the Refugee Board's decisions this week, the authorities will now review the pile of cases from the same province. This is good. We must give people protection for as long as it is needed. But when conditions in the home country improve, a former refugee should return home and re-establish a life there."

    October 3, 2020. The government proposed a new Repatriation Law to ensure that more rejected asylum seekers were sent home. At least 1,100 rejected asylum seekers in Denmark do not have the right to reside in the country, and more than 200 rejected asylum seekers have remained Denmark for a more than five years. The measures include paying failed asylum seekers 20,000 Danish kroner (€2,700; $3,600) to leave the country.



    September 11, 2020. The government proposed an amendment to the Foreigners' Citizenship Act that would deny Danish citizenship to Danish jihadists — so-called foreign fighters. Cabinet Minister Kaare Dybvad said:

    "The government will go to great lengths to prevent foreign fighters who have turned their backs on Denmark from returning to Denmark. We are talking about men and women who have committed or supported outrageous crimes. Therefore, it must also be possible in the future to deprive them of their citizenship."

    September 10, 2020. The government created a new ambassadorial post and a task force to work to establish migrant reception centers in third countries outside of the European Union — in Libya, Tunisia or Morocco.



    May 31, 2018. The Danish Parliament approveda ban on Islamic full-face veils in public spaces. The law, sponsored by the center-right government in power at the time, and backed by the Social Democrats and the Danish People's Party, passed by 75 votes to 30. Anyone found wearing a burka (which covers the entire face) or a niqab (which covers the entire face except for the eyes) in public in Denmark is subject to a fine of 1,000 Danish kroner (€134; $163); repeat offenders could be fined 10,000 Danish kroner. In addition, anyone found to be requiring a person through force or threats to wear garments that cover the face could be fined or face up to two years in prison.



    January 26, 2016. The Danish Parliament adopted several measures aimed at reducing the number of asylum seekers arriving in Denmark: The reintroduction of the requirement that only refugees with the highest potential for integration into Danish society be accepted; an increase in time requirement to three years for family reunifications for asylum seekers; an increase in time requirement before the awarding of permanent residency status; additional integration requirements, including the ability to prove language skills, before permanent residency can be attained; permanent and temporary residency status were made easier to lose; the introduction of fees to apply for family reunification and to convert temporary residence permit to permanent residence permit; a 10% reduction in economic aid to asylum seekers; police were given power to confiscate from asylum seekers items of value to support the cost of their stay; asylum seekers were required to live in special housing centers.



    Changing Demographics


    Denmark, which has a population of 5.8 million, received approximately 40,000 asylum applications during the past five years, accordingto data compiled by Statista. Most of the applications received by Denmark, a predominately Lutheran country, were from migrants from Muslim countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East.



    In recent years, Denmark has also permitted significant non-asylum immigration, especially from non-Western countries. Denmark is now home to sizeable immigrant communities from Syria (35,536); Turkey (33,111); Iraq (21,840); Iran (17,195); Pakistan (14,471); Afghanistan (13,864); Lebanon (12,990) and Somalia (11,282), accordingto Statista.



    Muslims currently comprise approximately 5.5% of the Danish population, according to the Pew Research Center. Under a "zero migration scenario," the Muslim population is projected to reach 7.6% by 2050; with a "medium migration scenario," it is forecast to hit 11.9% by 2050; and under a "high migration scenario," Muslims are expected to comprise 16% of the Danish population by 2050, according to Pew.



    As in other European countries, mass migration has resulted in increased crime and social tension. Danish cities have been plagued by shootings, car burnings and gang violence.



    During a recent EU review of the Schengen Agreement, the treaty that regulatesthe EU's system of open borders, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Integration Mattias Tesfaye said:

    "The possibility of reintroducing temporary border control is crucial for the security of Danes. This was shown by the refugee and migrant crisis in 2015. And the corona crisis has recently reaffirmed this. There is a need for changes to the Schengen rules so that member states have more flexibility to decide. We in Denmark know best when there is a need for control of Denmark's borders."

    On January 22, during a parliamentary hearing on Danish immigration policy, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said that she was determined to reduce the number of asylum approvals:

    "Our goal is zero asylum seekers. We cannot promise zero asylum seekers, but we can establish the vision for a new asylum system, and then do what we can to implement it. We must be careful that not too many people come to our country, otherwise our social cohesion cannot exist. It is already being challenged."

    In an interview with Danish broadcaster DR on June 3, MP Rasmus Stoklund said that if someone seeks refuge in Denmark in the future, he or she must expect to be deported to a third country: "Therefore, we hope that people will stop seeking asylum in Denmark."





    That opening third paragraph about imported gang crime is welcome.
    If only the British could take a leaf from the Danish book. However, UK legislation was put in place to prevent any such thoughts that contravene the "equity, diversity, inclusion" fake-religion.





    Will the USA follow suit and learn from Denmark? I pray and hope that more states in the USA start using the strategies to combat terrorism and parallel societies that are creeping into America with the goal to destroy the CONSTITUTION. The BLM, woke thinking, and terrorism have destroyed plenty during the Covid-19 years . President Trump gave the USA a start in truth and logical thinking and worked hard to close the borders . Wake up people of the free world and do what needs to be done to save your country. President Trump said "It will be a wall with doors in it and we will decide who gets in." We were working in that direction but now that has stopped with Biden 's people.



    Finally somebody in Europe has woken up to the fact that you can't have open borders so every body who wants a better life can come into your country and take advantage of your social security systems which are financed by the citizens of the country for the benefit of the citizens of that country.
    Here in Australia for several years we have had this "no exceptions" policy for people breaking into our community using illegal people smuggling routes and there is a policy that anybody arriving through such channels will be refused any citizenship application. As a corollary we have one of the most generous refugee resettlement programs in the world on a per capita basis provided applicants come through proper channels, and not through people-smugglers.
    However it must be noted that there are many refugee advocates who will use any possible loophole to gain benefits for their clients and it is a constant battle to maintain the barriers. In our country we spend tens of millions of dollars providing generous disability support to the handicapped and there is not enough money to go around to cover the needs of millions of potential migrants wanting a better life for themselves.



    Bad legislation can be repealed by a sensible government. In the UK it's time the Conservative majority got going and did some good for our country. In past times (long gone, I'm afraid) we have been leaders in good legislation but now we need to follow in the footsteps of the Danes. Let us hope their law will be a turning point for European civilisation.



    Denmark Cracks Down on Mass Migration
    "The Current Asylum System Has Failed" 16 VI 2021.





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    Denmark Facing ECHR Action Over Efforts to Send Syrian Refugees Home


    In July 2020, Danish Integration Minister Mattias Tesfaye asked the country's Immigration Service to review residence permits for hundreds of Syrian refugees, in a move based on the idea that the war in Syria is effectively over and they don't need protection.



    Denmark's current attempts to return scores of Syrians to Damascus may prompt other countries to follow suit, lawyers from the group Guernica 37 has warned.


    The organisation added that they are preparing a lawsuit against the Danish government, which will be submitted to
    the European Сourt of Human Rights (ECHR).


    Guernica 37 is a London-based international justice chamber that deals with pro-bono and affordable assistance related to transnational legal and human rights cases.



    © AP PHOTO / ERNST VAN NORDE
    A group of refugees and migrants who were walking north stand on the highway in southern Denmark on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015.


    According to Guernica 37's strategy note obtained by The Guardian, the current situation in Denmark is "deeply concerning" in terms of security.

    "While the risk of direct conflict-related violence may have diminished in some parts of Syria, the risk of political violence remains as great as ever, and refugees returning from Europe are being targeted by regime security forces", the note stressed.

    The document argued that "if the Danish government's efforts to forcibly return refugees to Syria is successful, it will set a dangerous precedent, which several other European states are likely to follow".


    Carl Buckley, the barrister leading Guernica 37's efforts, told The Guardian that turning to the ECHR in Strasbourg is just one of several options the affected Syrians may pick if the appeals procedure in Denmark fails.


    "The ECHR is a slow-moving system, but we would make an application asking the court to consider interim measures, which would involve ordering Denmark to stop revoking residencies until a substantive complaint has been considered and ruled upon. In theory that could happen pretty quickly. And while it would only apply to one individual's case, we would hope that Denmark would consider it carefully or they will end up with thousands of similar applications", Buckley said.

    Denmark Starts to Strip Syrian Refugees of Residence

    Earlier this year, Denmark became the first European country to strip residence permits from around 1,200 Syrian refugees living in the country. Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod suggested that while the civil war is still going on in many places in Syria, there are parts of the country where the situation is "different".


    He said the Danish authorities believe the Syrian capital Damascus is a safe area to return to, a view that is, however, opposed by the UN and Amnesty International.


    "Return assumes that conditions are consistently stable. We cannot see that anywhere in Syria", Elisabeth Haslund, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told reporters in mid-April.

    She voiced concern over what she called a clear change in Danish refugee policy, when the authorities tend to reconsider the basis for temporary residence permits more often than before.


    The Danish policy drew similar objections from Amnesty International, which emphasised that the returning Syrians may be at risk of serious human rights violations.


    In total, there are about 35,000 Syrians now living in Denmark, a nation of 5.8 million. Most of the Syrian refugees have arrived in Denmark over the past decade amid the simmering conflict, that left 6.6 million internally displaced, according to UN figures.




    Denmark Facing ECHR Action Over Efforts to Send Syrian Refugees Home
    29 VII 2021.



    Like so many Middle Easterners declaring themseves 'political refugees' was their entry pass to this European country that has one of the worlds best welfare systems. Either mass migration stops and they go, or the welfare system goes.

    "​Amnesty International, which emphasised that the returning Syrians may be at risk of serious human rights violations"
    - what about the human rights of the Danish who
    1) earned and paid for a welfare system and
    2) have the right for their country Denmark to remain ethnetically Danish or not. Put it to a referendum.

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