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Thread: Pictures Of Your Artwork

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    Pictures Of Your Artwork

    I did this stuff in my high school art class. I Havent' done any drawing since. :redface:

    A copy of Van Gogh's Starry Starry Night.




    I can't believe I did a drawing of my graphing calculator. :redface:








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    TI-89?
    Why They Hate Us by Joseph Sobran: Western man towers over the rest of the world in ways so large as to be almost inexpressible. It's Western exploration, science, and conquest that have revealed the world to itself. Other races feel like subjects of Western power long after colonialism, imperialism, and slavery have disappeared. The charge of racism puzzles whites who feel not hostility, but only baffled good will, because they don't grasp what it really means: humiliation. The white man presents an image of superiority even when he isn't conscious of it. And superiority excites envy. Destroying white civilization is the inmost desire of the league of designated victims we call 'minorities.' From Sobran's Newsletter, April 1997

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    A few sketches I made

    I just found these pictures again. A few sketches I made a while back.
    Sorry about the poor image quality.
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    More that I drew with colored pencil. The butterfly is made with torn construction paper.

    Why did I post these? I want critique. So go ahead and critique me. Also, what would be an interesting subject to draw next? The last two things I have worked on are a Germanian Oak grove and a picture of the wolf Fenris devouring the sun at Ragnorak.
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    Thumbs Down reply to sketches

    Your pencil sketches are quite nice, i would try to round out the eyelid more. To give the effect of a spherical eye underneath it. I enjoy the captured thought process of the man on the top far right. makes me wonder, what is he thinking? very nice and controlled shading of the uniforms. very detail oriented. I enjoy the still life sketchings also, your citrus is perfect and 3 dimensional, but the grapes are lacking shadow, great shading and control. My favorite is the mixed media butterfly. It almost appears like a stained glass effect. Nice work. I would enjoy to see more.

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    Very nice

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    Quote Originally Posted by NordicPower88
    Why did I post these? I want critique. So go ahead and critique me.
    I, personally, really despise recieving "constructive criticism", so I will just give you a few suggestions and tips that might help you to improve upon your already apparent skill in drawing. So far, I see a budding artist.

    In your pencil portraits, it appears that you have a fair understanding of shading, and the relationship between light and shadow. You've a somewhat developed aptitude for suggesting facial contours, and each of your portraits possess a good sense of character depth and facial expression/emotion.

    That being said, I would suggest, since you appear to be interested in portraiture, that you maybe take a class dedicated to drawing human subjects, or perhaps even an anatomy course, as your drawings aren't as completely lifelike and "convincing" as I believe they could be. You obviously have talent, but learning specific drawing techniques would really help to bring out the best in your work. Also, you should try drawing nudes, if you are comfortable with that. You never really notice every subtlety of the human body, every contour, wrinkle or bone protrusion, until it is layed bare before you, as clothes tend to complicate things and hide from view the true lay of the body.

    May I ask what kind of paper and pencils you use? Most often, the materials that an artist uses can make a difference of night and day, in terms of the quality of the finished product. The best advice I have ever gotten on this matter is this: Buy the best art supplies that you can afford and spare no expense, unless you have to. When concerning artist supplies atleast, price truly does indicate quality and the better the products that you use, the better your result will be.

    As for your colored pencil drawings: They are very pretty, and quite vibrant. (Methinks I recognize your inspiration for the colored pencil "wheel"... is it the Prismacolor logo, by chance? ) Your grapes, though, do need some work. I don't want to sound harsh or anything, because they really are well done, but their shading and highlights are just a bit too uniform and precise, and the grapes themselves are just so round and similar to eachother, with barely any fluctuation of size and shape... Try to emulate or "copy", dare I say, a few still life photos of fruit, (even if drawing apples and oranges isn't your passion, it's still a very good exercise in still life), just so you can get a concept of the texture of the fruit, it's manifestation of light and shadow, the way each piece of it is entirely different than the other, and the overall relationship of the subjects with eachother and their surroundings.

    Also, try very subtle color layering... the color that you see "on" something is not it's only hue. A purple grape, for instance, is not just composed of a monochromatic scheme of purples. That is simply the color that is choosing to represent itself most vividly. Take a while to just observe and study the subject that you wish to draw. Look at in different light settings - both natural and artificial - and at different angles. You will start to see that maybe that purple looks to have a little brown in some lights, or maybe a reddish undertone, or a green cast, or whatever... Once you start to get a sense for all the colors that are represented "below" the most apparently colored surface, you should then slowly, with lightly penciled layers, build up a base of these hues. Then, start adding in your high and lowlights... But first, you have to decide what hue those are.

    Most often, an object does not have a black shadow, and a white highlight. (it's never that easy, unfortunately! ) What colors do the light and shadow reflect? Is the highlight on your subject leaning toward yellow? Does it's shadows contain a rich, olivine hue? Etc. Whatever shade they possess, you should try to incorporate it into your drawings, for it will give them a more natural, and life-like appearance.

    After you've penciled in your multi-toned, multi-layered, "base", then start applying the color that is most obviously going to be expressed. If purple is the color, what kind of "purple" is it? Is it more violet (blue based), or more plum (red based), etc.? Once you decide on what color it is, don't just use dark, medium and light shades of that same color. Go for the full-spectrum of dark to light in that particular hue, and also throw in a few contrasting tones in the same shade family (i.e. if it's blue-based, go for the same "color", but based in yellow or red, etc.), for depth and fluctuation... Use as many different variations as possible, and don't use the same combination on each grape, or whatever it is you are drawing. Shake things up a bit, but always remember to apply lightly, and always in layers. Build your drawing. It's a rather arduous process, but in the end, it's so well worth it. Your drawings will begin to leap from their cold, paper surfaces with tangible vibrance and light... it just takes a lot of practice, and patience.

    Just look, and "listen" with your eyes, and you will learn a lot about whatever it is that you are wanting to draw. Color relationship is the single most important factor when you are choosing to work in any medium that is not simply black & white, so my advice - again - is to go to as many art classes as you can. In the wide and wonderous world of art, you can never, NEVER!, learn too much.

    Well, I guess that's all from me. :redface: I meant to give you a few "tips", but it would appear that I've written a whole essay. I hope you find some of what I referenced to be useful, (or atleast comprehendable - I tend to babble incoherently at times), and that you didn't think me to be too hard on you.

    Also, what would be an interesting subject to draw next?
    Hmmm... I don't think I can help you much there. The only thing I ever seem to draw these days are nude women (tastfully done, mind you ) and horses. ani:

    As for inspiration, you seem to have quite a wide range of artistic pursuits, an apparent willingness to explore different subject matter, and a wonderfully creative spirit that manifests itself in the drawings that you share. I wish much continued success with your art, and I sincerely hope that with it you achieve all that your heart desires. Artistic expression is a very wonderous and magical vehicle that can take you wherever it is your imagination is willing to go, and I have faith that you will journey far and wide with that pencil of your's. Happy Drawing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by zombienursestef
    Your pencil sketches are quite nice, i would try to round out the eyelid more. To give the effect of a spherical eye underneath it. I enjoy the captured thought process of the man on the top far right. makes me wonder, what is he thinking? very nice and controlled shading of the uniforms. very detail oriented. I enjoy the still life sketchings also, your citrus is perfect and 3 dimensional, but the grapes are lacking shadow, great shading and control. My favorite is the mixed media butterfly. It almost appears like a stained glass effect. Nice work. I would enjoy to see more.
    Thanks! Ah yes the grapes, I was sitting in an empty room without any apparant beauty and wanted to draw something, so I imagined some grapes and an orange. In fact I wanted to add a stem but my husbands parents liked the drawing so much that I gave it to them...

    The stained glass effect on the butterfly is exactly what I was going for. I remember sitting down and thinking I want to make stained glass because I think it's absolutely beautiful, but I didnt want to make a church, and thought a butterfly would be perfect.

    The reason I didn't round the eyelid is because I think that rounded, somewhat bulging eyelids are more of a mediterranean trait, and I was trying to capture their nordic essence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eyðimörk
    I, personally, really despise recieving "constructive criticism", so I will just give you a few suggestions and tips that might help you to improve upon your already apparent skill in drawing. So far, I see a budding artist.

    In your pencil portraits, it appears that you have a fair understanding of shading, and the relationship between light and shadow. You've a somewhat developed aptitude for suggesting facial contours, and each of your portraits possess a good sense of character depth and facial expression/emotion.

    That being said, I would suggest, since you appear to be interested in portraiture, that you maybe take a class dedicated to drawing human subjects, or perhaps even an anatomy course, as your drawings aren't as completely lifelike and "convincing" as I believe they could be. You obviously have talent, but learning specific drawing techniques would really help to bring out the best in your work. Also, you should try drawing nudes, if you are comfortable with that. You never really notice every subtlety of the human body, every contour, wrinkle or bone protrusion, until it is layed bare before you, as clothes tend to complicate things and hide from view the true lay of the body.
    Drawing the human body has never been one of my strong points, I always find it lacking in detail. But if I could do it there are at least a few new projects that would open up to me that I have wanted to do for some time. The main problem with the portraits is probably because they are drawn from photos and pictures as obviously I can't go back in time and meet Hitler, Goering and Bismarck. So for a lot of lacking details I either had to guess or ignore. I think you might be able to tell quite a difference between the others and the Hitler drawing. It took me about 4 weeks to complete it. Well, not every day but you know... on the other hand the Swede in the left hand corner, took me two days, Goering took me a week and Bismarck took about 4 days or so. I don't think I could find a real life model who would be willing to hold still that long... hehe

    May I ask what kind of paper and pencils you use? Most often, the materials that an artist uses can make a difference of night and day, in terms of the quality of the finished product. The best advice I have ever gotten on this matter is this: Buy the best art supplies that you can afford and spare no expense, unless you have to. When concerning artist supplies atleast, price truly does indicate quality and the better the products that you use, the better your result will be.
    The pencil I used to the drawings are just regular pencils like you use in school. For the more detailed things I took a mechanical pencil. However, nowadays I do have a few artist pencils, but with pencil I honestly dont find much difference. Of course, it needs to be a heavy lead that gets nearly black, and should blend well, but any regular pencil, or combination of pencils not made in China can fulfill that role, I think.

    As for paper, it varies, sometimes I use printer paper, sometimes (most often) artist sketchbook paper, whatever I have on hand at the time really. I actually got a lot of high quality sketchbooks when I was in high school since that was a requirement for art class. I figured that I would surely use up at least two within a year, lol.... and every time I was shopping and saw some good ones with nice thick paper, I got those too. So I still have a bunch of sketchbooks laying around, but sometimes I can't find them when I need them!

    As for your colored pencil drawings: They are very pretty, and quite vibrant. (Methinks I recognize your inspiration for the colored pencil "wheel"... is it the Prismacolor logo, by chance? ) Your grapes, though, do need some work. I don't want to sound harsh or anything, because they really are well done, but their shading and highlights are just a bit too uniform and precise, and the grapes themselves are just so round and similar to eachother, with barely any fluctuation of size and shape... Try to emulate or "copy", dare I say, a few still life photos of fruit, (even if drawing apples and oranges isn't your passion, it's still a very good exercise in still life), just so you can get a concept of the texture of the fruit, it's manifestation of light and shadow, the way each piece of it is entirely different than the other, and the overall relationship of the subjects with eachother and their surroundings.
    Thanks, yes I really like to work with the brightest colors I can create. That's why sometimes they aren't the "true" colors for the object. But yes, I use Prisma colors, and I'm pretty excited that my mom is getting me some new prisma colors in a metal case for christmas. I might just do some still lifes of fruit since I think fruit has a natural beauty and it will always hold still as long as I want. The only problem with fruits are that they are seldom as brightly colored as I would like them to be. So sometimes I just imagine some new colors. Like the grapes. I know that many grapes are a dull purplish brown, or a deep dark purple. I wanted my grapes to be more vibrant though, so I made them purplish blue. I actually used blue quite extensively, but unfortunately the images are too bad quality to really show that. I would like to get a scanner soon, then I can repost these and some of my newer artwork. The other problem with the grapes is that there were no grapes. I imagined them, and could not really accurately "place" the individual shadows. Also, I never got to shade the inside of the bunch, obviously you can't see through a bunch of grapes and they dont float in mid air either...

    Also, try very subtle color layering... the color that you see "on" something is not it's only hue. A purple grape, for instance, is not just composed of a monochromatic scheme of purples. That is simply the color that is choosing to represent itself most vividly. Take a while to just observe and study the subject that you wish to draw. Look at in different light settings - both natural and artificial - and at different angles. You will start to see that maybe that purple looks to have a little brown in some lights, or maybe a reddish undertone, or a green cast, or whatever... Once you start to get a sense for all the colors that are represented "below" the most apparently colored surface, you should then slowly, with lightly penciled layers, build up a base of these hues. Then, start adding in your high and lowlights... But first, you have to decide what hue those are.
    I guess this is just a stylistic thing of mine. I prefer the brightest, strongest colors, so while I include other varying shades, I prefer to leave out greys and browns which muddle the color, and substitute them with other colors.

    Most often, an object does not have a black shadow, and a white highlight. (it's never that easy, unfortunately! ) What colors do the light and shadow reflect? Is the highlight on your subject leaning toward yellow? Does it's shadows contain a rich, olivine hue? Etc. Whatever shade they possess, you should try to incorporate it into your drawings, for it will give them a more natural, and life-like appearance.
    I guess this too is more a case of style. Of course, I agree that these colors are all present, I just choose not to capture them. I like to work with only pencil for portraits. Maybe some time I will decide to add color, but I find with color they look quite bad because I have yet to find a lifelike skin color, or combination of colors that produce a lifelike skin tone... :

    After you've penciled in your multi-toned, multi-layered, "base", then start applying the color that is most obviously going to be expressed. If purple is the color, what kind of "purple" is it? Is it more violet (blue based), or more plum (red based), etc.? Once you decide on what color it is, don't just use dark, medium and light shades of that same color. Go for the full-spectrum of dark to light in that particular hue, and also throw in a few contrasting tones in the same shade family (i.e. if it's blue-based, go for the same "color", but based in yellow or red, etc.), for depth and fluctuation... Use as many different variations as possible, and don't use the same combination on each grape, or whatever it is you are drawing. Shake things up a bit, but always remember to apply lightly, and always in layers. Build your drawing. It's a rather arduous process, but in the end, it's so well worth it. Your drawings will begin to leap from their cold, paper surfaces with tangible vibrance and light... it just takes a lot of practice, and patience.
    Well you'rr right, and I do actually do this, unfortunately you can't see it on the details. Of late I drew a picture of red and pink flowers where I added actually half the colors I had, and they still came out vibrant, but that was because I used oil pastels. I find that they are much brighter, but harder and messier to work with. The picture is framed and hanging on the wall in our apartment, and people thought we bought it from the store, hehe.

    Just look, and "listen" with your eyes, and you will learn a lot about whatever it is that you are wanting to draw. Color relationship is the single most important factor when you are choosing to work in any medium that is not simply black & white, so my advice - again - is to go to as many art classes as you can. In the wide and wonderous world of art, you can never, NEVER!, learn too much.
    I guess here I disagree. A lot of artists work with certain colors only in a drawing to produce a certain mood. Actually I think it's great to use colors like that. The shading and depth of color is of course very important because without it you have a flat world instead of a spherical one. But the earth could be red and purple if the artist decided they wanted it that way.

    Well, I guess that's all from me. :redface: I meant to give you a few "tips", but it would appear that I've written a whole essay. I hope you find some of what I referenced to be useful, (or atleast comprehendable - I tend to babble incoherently at times), and that you didn't think me to be too hard on you.
    Yes I thank you for the tips, I didn't expect anyone to actually go that in depth, but I appreciate it.

    Believe me you couldn't be harder than my own family and my art teacher. My mom took one look at my childhood art and exclaimed "They have flat heads!" and started laughing.


    Hmmm... I don't think I can help you much there. The only thing I ever seem to draw these days are nude women (tastfully done, mind you ) and horses. ani:
    You say you draw horses, is that one of yours in your avatar? I have been admiring your avatar now for quite some time.

    As for inspiration, you seem to have quite a wide range of artistic pursuits, an apparent willingness to explore different subject matter, and a wonderfully creative spirit that manifests itself in the drawings that you share. I wish much continued success with your art, and I sincerely hope that with it you achieve all that your heart desires. Artistic expression is a very wonderous and magical vehicle that can take you wherever it is your imagination is willing to go, and I have faith that you will journey far and wide with that pencil of your's. Happy Drawing!
    Thanks well I will of course try to keep getting better and better. I know I have vastly improved since my childhood days, and like to think in 10 years I will be that much better again...

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    You have talent. Nurture it.
    "If you are going to tell people the truth, you'd better make them laugh. Otherwise they'll kill you."

    - George Bernard Shaw

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