Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Europeans Have Higher Grip Strength Than Middle Easterners

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Last Online
    Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016 @ 12:30 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Scotland/England
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Teutonic Order Teutonic Order
    Location
    Drowning in the Shallow End
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Politics
    National Socialism
    Religion
    Balsamic Lord
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Europeans Have Higher Grip Strength Than Middle Easterners

    This study compares the grip strength of Europeans and Asians*.

    *"Asian" in this context being the British definition of the word, meaning Middle Eastern and not East Asians, who frequently perform as well or better than Europeans on grip strength.

    http://www.hth.sagepub.com/content/17/1/11.abstract

    Abstract

    Introduction Evaluation of grip and pinch strengths of the hand is an effective way of measuring hand function. There is no study available on grip strength (GS) in young healthy Asian populations. We deal with a large number of Asian patients in Yorkshire. This study was carried out to gather data on the grip and pinch strengths in adult Asians and to compare the results with that in Europeans.

    Methods A Jamar dynamometer (Asimow Engineering®) and Pinch Gauge (B & L Engineering®) were used for measuring the grip and pinch strengths, respectively, in pounds. American Society of Hand Therapist's recommendations for standard hand positioning for the tests were followed. Subjects were healthy adults divided into five age groups of 10-year intervals. The height and weight of all subjects were also recorded.

    Results There were 105 Asians and 103 Europeans. The mean GS in Asians were 92.8 lbs (right) and 89.3 lbs (left) in men and 53 lbs (right) and 51.3 lbs (left) in women, respectively. The key pinch strength and tip pinch strength were 22 and 15.3 lbs in men and 15 and 10.3 lbs in women, respectively. The GS was higher in Europeans than in Asians. However, the pinch strength was higher only in European women and not in both sexes. GS has a direct relationship with height and weight but not with body mass index.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 03:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Pool Closer View Post
    This study compares the grip strength of Europeans and Asians*.

    *"Asian" in this context being the British definition of the word, meaning Middle Eastern and not East Asians, who frequently perform as well or better than Europeans on grip strength.

    http://www.hth.sagepub.com/content/17/1/11.abstract
    Second link does not work for me.

    The hand grip differences and the chair exercises and differences between Japanese and Americans were women only. In the study there was mention of a possible bias because of occupational and cultural differences. Testing rural people against city people and testing a culture accustomed to the use of backed chairs vs. one which is not is not a fair test of anything.

    Grip and pinch tests between "Asians" and Europeans: Please note that four groups are involved, men, women, Asians and Europeans. This means Asian men, Asian women and European men and European women all shared in the sample number. This would average about 52 per group. I can't see the study referenced but is this number statistically significant? When the sample size is this small, it is a natural question to ask.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Last Online
    Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016 @ 12:30 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Scotland/England
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Teutonic Order Teutonic Order
    Location
    Drowning in the Shallow End
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Politics
    National Socialism
    Religion
    Balsamic Lord
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    Second link does not work for me.

    The hand grip differences and the chair exercises and differences between Japanese and Americans were women only. In the study there was mention of a possible bias because of occupational and cultural differences. Testing rural people against city people and testing a culture accustomed to the use of backed chairs vs. one which is not is not a fair test of anything.

    Grip and pinch tests between "Asians" and Europeans: Please note that four groups are involved, men, women, Asians and Europeans. This means Asian men, Asian women and European men and European women all shared in the sample number. This would average about 52 per group. I can't see the study referenced but is this number statistically significant? When the sample size is this small, it is a natural question to ask.
    Try this:


    http://hth.sagepub.com/content/17/1/11.abstract

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Last Online
    Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016 @ 12:30 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Scotland/England
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Teutonic Order Teutonic Order
    Location
    Drowning in the Shallow End
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Politics
    National Socialism
    Religion
    Balsamic Lord
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    65% of a Person's Grip Strength is Genetically Determined, Linked to Genetic Fitness

    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2007/...dow-your-genes

    A limp handshake might say more about a man than he'd like to admit. According to new research, a firm grip is an indicator of genetic fitness. The findings link grip strength to aggressive behavior and sexual history and might provide insight into the mindsets of bullies.

    Hand grip strength (HGS) is an inherited trait; about 65% of a person's grip strength is genetically determined, whereas the remaining 35% depends on training and developmental factors such as nutrition. Past studies have connected HGS to various measures of physical condition, including bone density and longevity. "It's a ubiquitous measure of health and vitality," says evolutionary psychologist Gordon Gallup of the University at Albany in New York state.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Last Online
    Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016 @ 12:30 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Scotland/England
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Teutonic Order Teutonic Order
    Location
    Drowning in the Shallow End
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Politics
    National Socialism
    Religion
    Balsamic Lord
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    White Men Have Higher Grip Strength Than Black and Hispanic Men

    http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral...71-2458-10-508

    Data were obtained from the Boston Area Community Health/Bone (BACH/Bone) Survey, a population-based, cross-sectional, observational survey. Subjects included 1,157 black, Hispanic, and white randomly-selected Boston men ages 30-79 y. Lean mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Upper extremity (grip) strength was assessed with a hand dynamometer and lower extremity physical function was derived from walk and chair stand tests. Upper extremity strength and lower extremity physical function were also indexed by lean mass and lean mass was indexed by the square of height.

    Results
    Mean age of the sample was 47.5 y. Substantial cross-sectional age differences in grip strength and physical function were consistent across race/ethnicity. Racial/ethnic differences, with and without adjustment for covariates, were evident in all outcomes except grip strength. Racial differences in lean mass did not translate into parallel differences in physical function. For instance, multivariate modeling (with adjustments for age, height, fat mass, self-rated health and physical activity) indicated that whereas total body lean mass was 2.43 kg (approximately 5%) higher in black compared with white men, black men had a physical function score that was approximately 20% lower than white men.

    Conclusions
    In spite of lower levels of lean mass, the higher levels of physical function observed among white compared with non-white men in this study appear to be broadly consistent with known racial/ethnic differences in outcomes.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 03:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    From the text of the last post:

    Associations were considered statistically significant if null hypotheses could be rejected at the 0.05 level (two-sided).

    --------------------------

    First, are the using the statistical method were 1.00 is unity, 0.99 is 99% etc. I am not clear about this. (see Three below).

    Second, this is a clinical study, by their admission. A clinical study is whoever walks into the clinic. No attempt is made to model the sample to reflect reality.

    I am unclear if the sample size reaches statistical significance. They use regression of the mean and other statistical methods but never actually state statistical significance of the sample size---or did I miss it?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Catterick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 7th, 2017 @ 01:29 AM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic and Celtic
    Ancestry
    British Isles & Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Borreby x Nordic
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Aqua
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Gondolier
    Posts
    2,196
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    20
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    The British in sage means South Asian, not Middle Eastern. The latter being a meaningless term in race, anyway. Whereas South Asians are practically all mixes of Nordic-like steppe people with native Indians including Veddoids, Mundas and Atlanto-Mediterranean or Eurafrican farmers.

    To be honest I imagine gracilised races have weaker grip than robust peoples. Northern Europeans are more robust than Indids so it stands to reason South Asians the have weaker grip.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 03:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Catterick View Post
    The British in sage means South Asian, not Middle Eastern. The latter being a meaningless term in race, anyway. Whereas South Asians are practically all mixes of Nordic-like steppe people with native Indians including Veddoids, Mundas and Atlanto-Mediterranean or Eurafrican farmers.

    To be honest I imagine gracilised races have weaker grip than robust peoples. Northern Europeans are more robust than Indids so it stands to reason South Asians the have weaker grip.
    Believe it or not some people have an additional forearm muscle from others. If you make a hard fist and then flex the fist inward, exposing the forearm tendons (attached to a muscle) some people have two and some people have three tendons, indicating the number of muscles here. This has little to do with grip however.

    All things being equal, the space between the radius and the ulna is the obvious indicator. The more space, the more room for muscles. Neanderthals hand a huge space high on the lower arm where these bones widely diverged and allowed for fantastic grip strength. Also, the size of the wrist seems to indicate grip strength in a positive way.

Similar Threads

  1. Middle Eastern Populations Have Higher Recessive Disease Load
    By Pool Closer in forum Population Genetics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Monday, September 5th, 2016, 08:41 PM
  2. Totalitarianism Increasing Grip on Western Societies
    By SwordOfTheVistula in forum Articles & Current Affairs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Thursday, June 12th, 2008, 03:21 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Friday, May 21st, 2004, 04:25 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •