Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Questions About the United Kingdom

  1. #1
    Senior Member Englisc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 14th, 2016 @ 12:01 PM
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Anglo-Celt
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    England England
    State
    Yorkshire Yorkshire
    Location
    West Riding
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Occupation
    Law student
    Politics
    Conservative, Nationalist
    Religion
    Lapsed Catholic
    Posts
    446
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Questions About the United Kingdom

    I have noticed threads here for questions about Sweden and Norway , so....

    I decided to start a thread for your questions abut the United Kingdom!


    Foreigners often seem rather fascinated with us and all our ancient customs, and ofcourse we've been in the news recently because of the Brexit vote. If you have a question about anything UK-related, post it here and I or one of the other Brits will try to answer.

  2. #2
    . "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member



    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    .
    Gender
    Age
    54
    Religion
    +
    Posts
    848
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    11
    Thanked in
    11 Posts

    Question BritRail & Rail Travel In The U. K. (Including Ireland)?

    ...great thread Eng.! For starters, I welcome comments and especially suggestions relating to BritRail and rail/train travel in general in the U. K., including Ireland...




    ...the "how to-s", the best ways to operate/travel, the wisest things to do, does it take 'forever' to get from point 'A' to point 'B', etc. E. g., should an ordinary traveler have personal security concerns travelling via rail in Britain, etc.? Thank y'all in advance for the replies.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Englisc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 14th, 2016 @ 12:01 PM
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Anglo-Celt
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    England England
    State
    Yorkshire Yorkshire
    Location
    West Riding
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Occupation
    Law student
    Politics
    Conservative, Nationalist
    Religion
    Lapsed Catholic
    Posts
    446
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    5 Posts
    Suomot,

    Well, British rail is pretty confusing even to most Brits!

    Probably the best resource is the "Man in Seat 61" website...
    http://www.seat61.com/

    Britain's railways are privatised, so prices, services, etc. depend on the company that runs the routes. Always book on the websites of these regional operators rather than on thetrainline.com or other national sites as these avoid a booking fee.

    Big tip: Always, always pre-book if possible. Prices are ridiculously lower booking a few weeks or even days before. It can also save money to buy two tickets for two sections of the journey (eg if one section is peak-time and one isn't)

    You mention the BritRail pass, available for non-EU visitors, unlimited travel for a certain period of time. This is only worth it if you are planning to make many long distance.

    Rail coverage is good, especially compared to what you may be used to in the US. Just about every large town and many smaller ones or villages have a train station, and except in the smallest of villages services are quite frequent in my experience.

    As for whether it's worth it. As mentioned above, UK trains can be poor value, there are rather often cancellations and strikes, the trains themselves are often unattractive and poorly kept, and especially in the South-east / London are often very, very crowded. Unless you are a big lover of train travel, I would reccomend taking a car or using buses or coaches. Britain is not a huge country, especially excluding the northern reaches of Scotland.

    I am not aware of any significant problems with personal security on British trains - unlike in Rome this Easter when I saw my friend attempted pick pocketed on the Roman rube!

    Britain has a number of heritage railways, old steam trains that typically go through beautiful countrysides. I took one of these recently, from Pickering to Whitby, and it was well worth it. More: http://www.heritage-railways.com/

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Americans tend to eat mass produced foods such as beef, chicken, pork and not much else. In the past we ate more lamb, more wild food. I ate rabbit as a child but cannot find it in the market anymore.

    The British are always associated with what sound like ancient foods such as kidney pies, blood pudding and mince pie (we have mince pie but not with meat in it).

    Scotts evidently do eat breakfast food which, let us say, does not come in a box. British eat bangers which I do not like.

    My favorite pie is chess pie which is said to be of British origin. Is this true?

    Main Question: Is the above assessment correct? If not why? Tell me about uniquely British food.

  5. #5
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    The Horned God's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    Friday, June 30th, 2017 @ 08:09 PM
    Ethnicity
    Irish
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Ireland
    Gender
    Age
    41
    Family
    Single adult
    Posts
    2,249
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    8
    Thanked in
    8 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    The British are always associated with what sound like ancient foods such as kidney pies, blood pudding and mince pie (we have mince pie but not with meat in it).

    Main Question: Is the above assessment correct? If not why? Tell me about uniquely British food.
    I don't know about the UK, but I can speak for Ireland.

    Just over 100 years ago James Joyce in his seminal work "Ulysses" famously wrote about a character who loved to eat organ meat;

    “Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls. He liked thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liverslices fried with crustcrumbs, fried hencods' roes. Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine.”
    This style of eating was more common in the past than it is now. Heart, liver, lungs, gibblets (assorted chicken organs), tripe (cows stomach) etc, were the cheapest cuts of meat, but fell out of fashion when meat became cheaper after the advent of modern farming practices.

    I doubt gizzards can be bought for consumption anymore this side of China and I'm not even sure what "hencods roes" are. Some type of cheap caviar maybe. Steak and Kidney pie can still be had in a lot of places, but I don't care for it. You can still get tongue from the butcher and it isn't half bad when well roasted. I do like fried liver though and I'll have a fried breakfast fairly often when time and finances allow...

    Fried breakfasts are still very popular here. You can buy a "breakfast roll" in just about any half decent petrol station in Ireland. A breakfast roll consists of bread roll packed with nearly everything you'd have in a fried breakfast; a fried egg, sausages, rashers, black and white pudding and a slice or two of fried tomato. The only thing it doesn't have is baked beans. I had one yesterday.

    Close observation may result in feelings of horror, wonder and awe at world you find yourself inhabiting.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Englisc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 14th, 2016 @ 12:01 PM
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Anglo-Celt
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    England England
    State
    Yorkshire Yorkshire
    Location
    West Riding
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Occupation
    Law student
    Politics
    Conservative, Nationalist
    Religion
    Lapsed Catholic
    Posts
    446
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    5 Posts
    It is rare that Brits will eat those things you mentioned. Mince pies are actually made with fruit, not meat, and are consumed around Christmas time often with cream or custard. Black pudding is served with English breakfasts in some eateries, though it's getting rarer to have this.

    Overall, Brits will eat anything, really. Many foreign cuisines like Italian, Chinese, Thai, Indian, and other types from around the world are popular here. Ofcourse American food has also come in, fast food and ready meals. I would guess that many Brits, especially younger ones, do not often eat English, Scottish or Welsh food very often at all.

    Traditional British food is certainly very meat-based, though going on what you say I don't think the meats used are that different from America - chicken, pork, beef, turkey, occasionally lamb. There are others but mostly confined to the upper class - not the common people. Common vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, carrots. There are essentially no spices (such styles didn't get this far north).

    Some traditional British dishes are:

    Meat (chicken, ham, turkey, beef most usually), a few different vegetables, and often a Yorkshire pudding


    Shephards pie


    Fish pie


    Cornish pasty


    I should also note here that fish and chips, probably the most popular "British" dish, is actually Jewish in origin.

    Yes, it is believed that chess pie was brought over from England to New England during the colonial era.

  7. #7
    Proffessional Hickerbilly
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    SpearBrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    American of German decent
    Ancestry
    Bavaria/Switzerland
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Kentucky Kentucky
    Location
    Central
    Gender
    Age
    53
    Zodiac Sign
    Libra
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    Kunstschmiede
    Politics
    Self-Reliance
    Religion
    Asatru
    Posts
    4,579
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2,789
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,307
    Thanked in
    607 Posts
    Why do you drive on the left side of the road?

    Why do you get milk from tin cans?

    What is the stereotypical British person?
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Englisc View Post
    It is rare that Brits will eat those things you mentioned. Mince pies are actually made with fruit, not meat, and are consumed around Christmas time often with cream or custard. Black pudding is served with English breakfasts in some eateries, though it's getting rarer to have this.

    Overall, Brits will eat anything, really. Many foreign cuisines like Italian, Chinese, Thai, Indian, and other types from around the world are popular here. Ofcourse American food has also come in, fast food and ready meals. I would guess that many Brits, especially younger ones, do not often eat English, Scottish or Welsh food very often at all.

    Traditional British food is certainly very meat-based, though going on what you say I don't think the meats used are that different from America - chicken, pork, beef, turkey, occasionally lamb. There are others but mostly confined to the upper class - not the common people. Common vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, carrots. There are essentially no spices (such styles didn't get this far north).

    Some traditional British dishes are:

    Meat (chicken, ham, turkey, beef most usually), a few different vegetables, and often a Yorkshire pudding


    Shephards pie


    Fish pie


    Cornish pasty


    I should also note here that fish and chips, probably the most popular "British" dish, is actually Jewish in origin.

    Yes, it is believed that chess pie was brought over from England to New England during the colonial era.

    I love beef roasts which I consider of British origin as well as meat pies, mince meat pies and especially fish and chips, Jewish or not. A guy selling fish and chips told me what he considered to the secrets of the trade. First, he said always use real cod. Second, fry the fish in peanut oil. I asked him why the peanut oil and he said because you can get peanut oil hotter and hot oil is what is needed.

    To learn that chess pie is actually of American origin is amazing since nobody knows what it is here. My mother learned to make it during the depression when she worked in a restaurant for awhile. It was rare then and seemingly unknown now.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by The Horned God View Post
    I don't know about the UK, but I can speak for Ireland.

    Just over 100 years ago James Joyce in his seminal work "Ulysses" famously wrote about a character who loved to eat organ meat;



    This style of eating was more common in the past than it is now. Heart, liver, lungs, gibblets (assorted chicken organs), tripe (cows stomach) etc, were the cheapest cuts of meat, but fell out of fashion when meat became cheaper after the advent of modern farming practices.

    I doubt gizzards can be bought for consumption anymore this side of China and I'm not even sure what "hencods roes" are. Some type of cheap caviar maybe. Steak and Kidney pie can still be had in a lot of places, but I don't care for it. You can still get tongue from the butcher and it isn't half bad when well roasted. I do like fried liver though and I'll have a fried breakfast fairly often when time and finances allow...

    Fried breakfasts are still very popular here. You can buy a "breakfast roll" in just about any half decent petrol station in Ireland. A breakfast roll consists of bread roll packed with nearly everything you'd have in a fried breakfast; a fried egg, sausages, rashers, black and white pudding and a slice or two of fried tomato. The only thing it doesn't have is baked beans. I had one yesterday.

    The breakfast roll looks really good but it would probably be enough calories for me for one day. My oldest daughter has been to Ireland twice. Ireland is her favorite European country. We Americans need a coffee fix in the morning and my daughter says this is no problem in Ireland, UK or Germany. She thought eating in France was a bit more problematic but mostly it was a difference in customs rather than actually getting the food. She has some funny stories about Paris and food.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    972
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Next question: Explain to me what is meant in the UK when someone says "public schools" or "public education". I have been told this does not mean the same thing as it does in the USA.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 127
    Last Post: Tuesday, November 27th, 2018, 11:18 AM
  2. Hello from the United Kingdom
    By British and Proud in forum Introductions & Greetings
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Saturday, April 14th, 2018, 05:01 AM
  3. Agreement of Mutual Assistance between the United Kingdom and Poland.-London, 1939
    By IlluSionSxxx in forum Modern Age & Contemporary History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, October 30th, 2007, 02:48 AM
  4. Classify Dukes of the United Kingdom
    By OneEnglishNorman in forum Anthropological Taxonomy
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Saturday, January 13th, 2007, 10:03 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •