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Thread: Mermaids

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    Mermaids

    Another topic that has intrigued me. Do you think they exist?

    Mummified Mermaid At Shah Alam



    Hundreds flock to the Shah Alam museum in Malaysia to see an exhibit of a mummified mermaid. The hair is the only item that has been added onto the exhibit. The picture was taken by Azahan Roslil. The mermaid owner Safuan Abu Bakar was offered RM300k by an Australian but he rejected the offer claiming that the exhibit was too rare.

    The mermaid was tracked down from a neighbouring country and yellow rice was used to draw it to the surface. Safuan also welcomes any scientist or interested parties to conduct experiments to prove they were not genuine. The exhibition will be ending on October 4th 2006.


    Here's a video:

    Real MERMAID Found


    Reality or hoax? :

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    Hoax, of course. There is a long history of these, starting with a hydra in Amsterdam that Linneaus (or was it Seba?) debunked, and running through one that is on display in the freak show at Cony Island.

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    I'd like to throw most females I know into the Sea but I do not believe in mermaids. The only possibility for mermaids to exist is an extraterrestriel geneticist with a weird sense of humour.
    Ceterum censeo Iudaeam esse delendam.

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    Not too sure about the mummified mermaid, but the other one (from the You tube video) has been identified as a “taxidermists fake”.

    According to comments on another site’s posting, the entire outer surface including all fins are authentic “once living” fish skin. The teeth are from a large fish. Everything is REAL except for the eyes which are glass. This mermaid was intended as a work of art, and apparently was not created to “try and fool anyone”.

    http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/xmermaidpix/

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    Mermaids = Manatees or Sea Cows…Why???

    Mermaids = Manatees or Sea Cows…Why???

    Modern revisionists or “professional” myth debunkers, appear to be showing some element of bias in suggesting that the Mermaids are Manatees, insofar as the idea that the reports MUST refer to another mammal species. But I don’t see this as being necessarily the case. We need to acknowledge that in describing “unknown” creatures to others (who did not see the entity), the observer needs to reference the sighting to something known, and therefore comparisons to known fauna or objects are inevitable. Expressions of any concept are always constrained by “vocabulary” – some existing idea or phenomenon (no matter how imperfect) must always be used in trying to communicate the message of something new. Furthermore, with all due respect to our ancestors, we need to remember that in the past there would have been even less concepts to choose from in selecting vocabulary to put across the description of an unknown (at least insofar as observational – descriptive accounts of large fauna).

    A parallel may be drawn to the Yeti; the name in itself is meaningful only to a restricted geographical area. Therefore, the idea of the Abominable Snowman was used. The “Snowman” here obviously was not intended to describe its appearance – it can be assumed that it meant something like a “man” which lives in the ice and snow-covered areas of the Himalayas. However, the majority of persons internalizing the description would have no idea what an actual Yeti looked like, so their brain would automatically link to the known concept of a snowman – worse yet an idyllic winter scene of children playing outdoors decorating their snowmen with hats, carrot noses and coal buttons.

    While unintended, the use of a specific word in the description becomes entrenched. Like in the case of Mermaids then, our descendents would be highly confused in trying to figure out how a Yeti siting (if the reports still exist) could be related to a “Snowman” and would be very likely to reject the idea that it could be the same thing. Another example would be a description of an observation as something "moving across the sky in a manner similar to a saucer being skipped across the lake" which unfortunately became a "flying saucer" (forgive this ufology reference, but it is a very relevant example).

    So, to return to the classical mermaids – it is very possible that a proto-sailor (searching for a way to describe something he had seen while out at sea) tried to convey an idea along the lines of “something like a fish that was almost human in its behaviour”. So, the idea (and depiction) became a half-fish / half-human creature that probably looked nothing like what the restricted group of ancient seafarers had actually seen. The Manatee seems unlikely not only for its obvious differences to pop-culture mermaids, but also its total difference to a fish (I have never heard seals, sea lions, walruses etc being compared to fish). Therefore, if it really was a marine mammal, I suspect DOLPHINS – they are known to follow boats (and guide them back to being within sight of land), and in the early days would have probably been even more curious about the land-mammals (humans) and their crafts. While dolphins do not look human or even like classical mermaids – the sailor would have been at a loss to describe this “almost human fish-like being” and therefore by having to reference known ideas, the Mermaid became fixed in the minds of the people (the majority of whom would know them only from accounts of sailors).

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    Another example would be a description of an observation as something "moving across the sky in a manner similar to a saucer being skipped across the lake" which unfortunately became a "flying saucer"
    I'm picking up on a bit of an irrelevant point here, but actually, I think the "saucer" bit is based on these things being saucer-shaped. I saw one once It was toward the sunset, gliding along smoothly but rapidly; it must be some kind of unknown (well, maybe scientists know all about it ) phenomenon. At any rate it was distinctly saucer-shaped.

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    Mermaids Uncovered

    The Japanese origin of museum mermaids.

    https://www.academia.edu/7978118/Mermaids_Uncovered

    Many museums and private collections in the UK, Europe, and the USA hold cultural artefacts of the type commonly referred to as mermen or ‘feejee mermaids’. Most of these are accompanied by little in the way of information about their origins, but they are generally associated with Asia and particularly with Japan. Perhaps as a result of their poor provenance, it is unusual for such specimens to be interpreted with reference to stories from their culture of origin; they are thus usually discussed on the basis of their authenticity— or lack thereof. Indeed, they are commonly regarded as hoaxes constructed from monkeys attached to fish, largely on the basis of supposition influenced by historical narratives (see Overmeer Fisscher 1833, Timbs 1867). The most infamous example of such a specimen is the eponymous Feejee Mermaid, exhibited by master showman P. T. Barnum from 1842 until it was probably destroyed in a museum fire between 1865 and 1880 (see Bondeson 1999: 56).

    The notoriety of Barnum’s Feejee Mermaid was a product of clever and deliberate obfuscation and manipulation of the facts (see Cook 2001), which has served to create an aura of mystery and confusion around feejee mermaids in general. Lack of honest depictions of, and information about, the Feejee Mermaid has allowed speculation that some mermaid figures, such as the specimen at the Peabody Museum (see Levi 1977), or the example discovered in a domestic attic in Southend (see Anonymous 1988) may be Barnum’s famous specimen. Such claims are ill-founded (see Nickell 2005) and blur distinctions between different specimens. With such a background of inveterate misinformation, it is little wonder that museums interpret and care for their feejee mermaids on the unchallenged understanding that they are taxidermy chimeras.

    With the advent of new technologies, such as computed tomography (CT) and phosphor plate X-radiography, such received wisdom can be put to the test by undertaking detailed non-invasive analysis of specimens. Minimally destructive methods such as sampling of DNA, protein, and hair may also be used to establish what materials have been used in the construction of specimens. Of course, such methods require expertise, necessitating interdisciplinary collaboration and communication. Such collaboration can inform and inspire more varied and exciting interpretations of objects when they are displayed.

    In this article we report some of the outcomes from such an approach applied to mermaid specimens held by the Horniman Museum & Gardens and Buxton Museum and Art Gallery. The work was stimulated by the ‘Object in Focus’ loans project run by the Horniman and funded by Arts Council England (formerly MLA). ‘Objects in Focus’ improved access to underutilized objects in the Horniman collection by loaning them to other organizations, along with a display-case and interpretation developed in collaboration with external partners.

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    Dugongs and Mermaids, Selkies and Seals

    About selkies, mermaids, dugongs and seals. Some people might find it odd to post here, but the Anglo-Celtic influence on the South Seas made its way back into colonial folklore (the Bunyip has Gaelic origins).

    Something similar is supposed to have happened in Japan and the "Feejee mermaid" class of artifacts were of Japanese manufacture.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...kies_and_Seals






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    Mermaids and Sea Nymphs

    For thousands of years there have been tales of mermaids and sea nymphs capturing the imagination of the people, and many artistic representations of these popular creatures.

    More...

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