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Thread: Long-term Genetic Stability and a High-altitude East Asian Origin for the Peoples of the High Valleys of the Himalayan Arc

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    Senior Member Catterick's Avatar
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    Long-term Genetic Stability and a High-altitude East Asian Origin for the Peoples of the High Valleys of the Himalayan Arc

    There is racial continuity from 1,150 BC to the present in the Himalayas but a lot of questions stay unanswered. Do Sherpas have more genes from pre-Sino-Tibetans? They are shifted away from other Mongoloids, even Himalayan Mongoloids, on PC1. This component shows a cline from Sherpas through other Himalayan Sino-Tibetans then lowland Tibetans (Yi) and Tibetan-influenced Mongolians (Tu) finally to other East Asians from Siberians to Southeast Asians.




    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/20...520844113.full

    The high-altitude transverse valleys [>3,000 m above sea level (masl)] of the Himalayan arc from Arunachal Pradesh to Ladahk were among the last habitable places permanently colonized by prehistoric humans due to the challenges of resource scarcity, cold stress, and hypoxia. The modern populations of these valleys, who share cultural and linguistic affinities with peoples found today on the Tibetan plateau, are commonly assumed to be the descendants of the earliest inhabitants of the Himalayan arc. However, this assumption has been challenged by archaeological and osteological evidence suggesting that these valleys may have been originally populated from areas other than the Tibetan plateau, including those at low elevation. To investigate the peopling and early population history of this dynamic high-altitude contact zone, we sequenced the genomes (0.04×–7.25×, mean 2.16×) and mitochondrial genomes (20.8×–1,311.0×, mean 482.1×) of eight individuals dating to three periods with distinct material culture in the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) of Nepal, spanning 3,150–1,250 y before present (yBP). We demonstrate that the region is characterized by long-term stability of the population genetic make-up despite marked changes in material culture. The ancient genomes, uniparental haplotypes, and high-altitude adaptive alleles suggest a high-altitude East Asian origin for prehistoric Himalayan populations.

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    Sherpas inherited the high altitude Denisovan gene which separates them from other East Asians. This high altitude gene must have taken awhile to evolve and so it seems to me the Denisovans may have been in Tibet at high altitude for a long time or we have here Denisovans living as Zana did, in other words Snowmen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    Sherpas inherited the high altitude Denisovan gene which separates them from other East Asians. This high altitude gene must have taken awhile to evolve and so it seems to me the Denisovans may have been in Tibet at high altitude for a long time or we have here Denisovans living as Zana did, in other words Snowmen.
    The high altitude gene must've been local because Himalayans develop health problems when at lower altitudes. Same thing with yaks though there were once lowland yaks.

    The Mongoloid skin gene is confirmed Denisovan according to the blog West Hunter. So Denisovans were especially smooth and not hairy (if he is right).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catterick View Post
    The high altitude gene must've been local because Himalayans develop health problems when at lower altitudes. Same thing with yaks though there were once lowland yaks.

    The Mongoloid skin gene is confirmed Denisovan according to the blog West Hunter. So Denisovans were especially smooth and not hairy (if he is right).

    I did check out "West Hunter" whoever he is. All descendants of the Denisovans we know of have dark skin. Even the people in Tibet have darker skin than the Han Chinese to whom they are related. Neither in Australia or in Melanesia are skins especially smooth and non-hairy. My take is the smooth, non-hair skin of East Asians and some Amerindians is a result of H. erectus ancestry as are the coarse hair, eye folds and small but firm breasts in women.

    I am not saying this to put these people down. The H. erectus who would have interbred with the sapiens people advancing into East Asia would not be the same as Peking Man. These were encephalized erectus found in East Asia but not really properly fitted into a modern phylogeny.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    I did check out "West Hunter" whoever he is. All descendants of the Denisovans we know of have dark skin. Even the people in Tibet have darker skin than the Han Chinese to whom they are related. Neither in Australia or in Melanesia are skins especially smooth and non-hairy. My take is the smooth, non-hair skin of East Asians and some Amerindians is a result of H. erectus ancestry as are the coarse hair, eye folds and small but firm breasts in women.

    I am not saying this to put these people down. The H. erectus who would have interbred with the sapiens people advancing into East Asia would not be the same as Peking Man. These were encephalized erectus found in East Asia but not really properly fitted into a modern phylogeny.
    West Hunter is just Greg Cochran now. Henry Harpending was also blogging there less frequently.

    Maybe Denisovan skin was useful to Mongoloids but not to Australoids? Or maybe it was loalised among Denisovans in the first place? Its not hard to explain away. The high percentage of Denisovan alleles in Melanesia seems to relate to immunity from tropical diseases.

    Similar I guess to the fossil record supporting a continuity from Peking Man to the modern East Asian "dental province", though this would be local gene flow across time via intermediate races or species. Reticulated evolution.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catterick View Post
    West Hunter is just Greg Cochran now. Henry Harpending was also blogging there less frequently.

    Maybe Denisovan skin was useful to Mongoloids but not to Australoids? Or maybe it was loalised among Denisovans in the first place? Its not hard to explain away. The high percentage of Denisovan alleles in Melanesia seems to relate to immunity from tropical diseases.

    Similar I guess to the fossil record supporting a continuity from Peking Man to the modern East Asian "dental province", though this would be local gene flow across time via intermediate races or species. Reticulated evolution.
    In the same way East Asian dental anomalies persisted through almost one million years, so might have the other soft body characters I mentioned.

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