INTRODUCTION
Contrary to popular perception, the presence of Germans in Latin America is not confined to fugitive Nazis. Although such notorious war criminals as Adolf Eichmann and Dr. Josef Mengele absconded to South America after the Second World War, they are by no means representative of the hundreds of thousands
of Latin Americans of German descent. Unfortunately, scholarship on the subject of Germans in Latin America has been piecemeal. Worthy monographs have been written on the development of particular segments of the region's
German population, and numerous journal articles have addressed more detailed topics, but a synthesis of this information is lacking.
This study briefly recounts the histories of Latin American countries' German populations and proceeds to point out their commonalities. Constraints of distance and time, and the very nature of the study, precluded extensive consultation of primary sources; rather, it is based upon scrutinization of dozens of secondary sources.



TABLE OF CONTENTS
. INTRODUCTION.
1 Chapter 1.
THE GERMANS OF BRAZIL
3 The Imperial Era
The Republican Era
Conclusion
2. THE GERMANS OF THE CARIBBEAN BASIN AND ANDEAN SOUTH AMERICA.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..
20 Mexico, Central America, and the Antilles
Northern South America Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia
Chile
Conclusion
3.
THE GERMANS OF THE RIO DE LA PLATA REGION.
. . . . . . .
39
Argentina
Paraguay
Uruguay
Conclusion
CONCLUSION
54
NOTES.
57
WORKS
CITED.
72
Content here: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/cg...context=honors