Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Craniometric Evidence of the Early Caucasoid Migrations to Siberia and Central Asia, with Reference to the Indo-European Problem

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Catterick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 7th, 2017 @ 12:29 AM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic and Celtic
    Ancestry
    British Isles & Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Borreby x Nordic
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Aqua
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Gondolier
    Posts
    2,197
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    40
    Thanked in
    40 Posts

    Craniometric Evidence of the Early Caucasoid Migrations to Siberia and Central Asia, with Reference to the Indo-European Problem

    Ancient Nordic populations in Siberia and Indo-Europeans in the east.

    https://www.academia.edu/4739993/Cra..._problem_2009_

    Measurements of 220 male Neolithic and Bronze Age cranial series from Eurasia were subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. The results support the idea that people associated with the Catacomb culture played a major rolein the origin of the Afanasyev culture. Okunev people of the Minusinsk Basin, those associated with Karakol, Ust-Tartas, and Krotovo cultures, and those buried in the Andronov-type cemeteries at Cherno-ozerye and Yelovka were of predominantly local Siberian origin. The Samus series resembles that from Poltavka burials. The Okunev people of Tuvaand probably Yelunino people were likely descendants of the Pit Grave (Yamnaya) and early Catacomb populations of the Ukraine. The same is true of the Alakul people of western Kazakhstan, who in addition, have numerous affinities amongst Neolithic and Early Bronze Age groups of Central and Western Europe. The probable ancestors of certain Fedorov populations were the Afanasyev tribes of the Altai, whereas other Fedorov groups apparently descended from late Pit Grave and Catacomb tribes of the Northern Caucasus and the northwestern Caspian. People of Gumugou are closest to Fedorov groups of northeastern Kazakhstan and Rudny Altai, suggesting that Caucasoids migrated to Xinjiang from the north rather than from the west. Describing the gracile Caucasoids of Siberia and Eastern Central Asia as“Mediterraneans” is misleading since they display virtually no craniometric ties with the Near Eastern, Southwestern Central Asian or Transcaucasian groups. The totality of evidence suggests that they were Nordics.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    974
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    23
    Thanked in
    21 Posts
    The author is a Russian guy and he appears to be doing fancy typology but probably ok. I would like to know what he means by "Nordic".

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Catterick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 7th, 2017 @ 12:29 AM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic and Celtic
    Ancestry
    British Isles & Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Borreby x Nordic
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Aqua
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Gondolier
    Posts
    2,197
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    40
    Thanked in
    40 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    The author is a Russian guy and he appears to be doing fancy typology but probably ok. I would like to know what he means by "Nordic".
    He means that the Caucasoids in question arrived from northern Europe instead of southwest Central Asia and they were depigmented instead of swarthy. Craniometrically, they are closer to Pontic steppe populations and Central Europeans than to Transcaucasians.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Saturday, May 27th, 2017, 03:58 AM
  2. Literary and Cultural Evidence of Indo-European Pastoralism
    By Ahnenerbe in forum Germanic & Indo-Germanic Origins
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Sunday, August 21st, 2016, 08:47 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Friday, June 10th, 2016, 05:38 PM
  4. Early Date for the Birth of Indo-European Languages
    By Euclides in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Saturday, June 19th, 2004, 12:45 PM
  5. Major Work: 'Indo-European Origins: The Anthropological Evidence' - J. V. Day (2001)
    By BodewinTheSilent in forum Germanic & Indo-Germanic Origins
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Saturday, October 4th, 2003, 12:50 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •