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Thread: AfD (Alternative für Deutschland)

  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winterland View Post
    Did he have any children?.....
    That doesn't seem to be clear, since the testator was to remain anonymous.

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    Impressive! It's been estimated in Euros, but the party may yet have it reassessed in Deutschmarks, or one hopes. Will the "Christian" party seek Jew usury to match this gift?

  3. #133
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    Björn Höcke Dissolves AfD’s Der Flügel After Merkel’s BfV Slanders Him as a Right-Wing Extremist



    After being placed under official observation by Merkel’s Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, Der Flügel (The Wing) – the Rightist wing the populist Alternative for Germany – led by Björn Höcke and Andreas Kalbitz has been dissolved.

    The sudden move comes after Höcke, Thuringia’s head of state, along with Brandenburg’s AfD chief Andreas Kalbitz, were both smeared as “enemies of democracy” and as “Right-wing extremists” by Merkel’s BfV intelligence agency, Der Spiegel reports.

    Höcke made the announcement on Saturday during an interview on the website “Sezession” which is operated by the New Right publisher Götz Kubitschek. The announcement of The Wing’s dissolution came under increased pressure to do so from the AfD’s centrist faction.

    According to Der Spiegel’s report, at an Alternative for Germany federal board meeting on Friday, it was ultimately decided that The Wing, an informal union within the AfD, would be dissolved by the end of April.

    During his interview with Kubitscheck, Höcke said that he was “embarrassed as an AfD member” by the decision that was made by the party at a time when the country was preparing to deal with the fallout caused by the coronavirus.

    Höcke noted that the purpose of The Wing was to prevent the party from developing in the wrong direction. Continuing, Höcke said now “we need and impulse that goes beyond the wing and emphasizes the unity of the party”.

    Höcke also criticized those within the AfD “who seek to maintain good contacts with the establishment at the expense of their party friends”.

    AfD parliamentary group leader Alice Weidel, who – following Merkel’s BfV’s decision to label Höcke and Kalbitz as “Right-wing extremists” – said her party would “take all possible rule of law measures against the observation” and accused the BfV of criminalizing her party “using underhanded methods.” She also praised Höcke’s decision to dissolve the informal union.

    “I would like to thank the protagonists of the wing for their swift action. They have taken a clear step toward unifying the party,” Weidel said.

    Earlier this month, when Voice of Europe first reported on Merkel’s Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution slandering Höcke and Kalbitz as extremists, AfD chairman Jörg Meuthen slammed the move, calling it a deliberate tactic to silence the party.

    “This is a politically motivated, anti-AfD convoluted act,” said Meuthen.

    The post Björn Höcke dissolves AfD’s Der Flügel after Merkel’s BfV slanders him as a Right-wing extremist appeared first on Voice of Europe.


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    Netanyahu’s Son is the Face of an AfD Campaign Poster



    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s son Yair is the face of a far-right campaign poster in Germany following his online rant about a joint Israeli-Palestinian ceremony held for Memorial Day in the occupation state.

    Joachim Kuhs, a senior Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, yesterday tweeted a poster of the young Netanyahu, echoing his calls for “a free, democratic and Christian” Europe.

    The poster text says, “Schengen is dead. Hopefully, the globalist EU will be too. Then, Europe will again be free, democratic and Christian.” Kuhs has tweeted the poster, with Yair Netanyahu’s photograph and quote on it, with his own comment that, “#Christianity is the #cure for the evils of the globalist #EU, wrote Yair Netanyahu.”

    The Schengen zone comprises 26 European states that have officially abolished all passport and other border controls within the zone. Members include Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Norway, Poland, Portugal and Switzerland.

    Yair Netanyahu replied to Kuhs’ tweet, saying, “Please act with your colleagues to stop this insanity!” He included a link to a page on the NGO Monitor website that describes how, “The German federal government provides millions of euros to political advocacy NGOs in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza through a variety of frameworks.”


  5. #135
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    Christian Lueth (AfD) Sacked For Reportedly Suggesting Migrants Could Be Killed

    Christian Lueth of Alternative für Deutschland was already suspended after allegedly describing himself as a ‘fascist’



    The far-right Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) party has fired a prominent official following reports that he made comments suggesting that migrants could be killed.

    The party confirmed Monday that Christian Lueth, who was already suspended from his post as parliamentary spokesman in April after allegedly describing himself as a “fascist,” had his contract terminated with immediate effect.

    German media reported that Lueth told a young blogger in February that the worse off Germany is, the better it would be for his party, and that migrants coming to the country “could still be shot later on … or gassed”.

    The meeting was secretly filmed by the broadcaster ProSieben for a documentary to be aired Monday about Germany’s far right. The speaker’s face wasn’t shown in the footage but the weekly Die Zeit reported that it was Lueth.

    The AfD has campaigned vociferously against immigration and saw a surge in support when hundreds of thousands of refugees were allowed to come into Germany in 2015. It is currently the largest opposition party in the national legislature.

    Lueth declined to comment, saying he planned to issue a statement on Tuesday.

    AfD has come under heightened scrutiny from Germany’s domestic intelligence agency amid concern that some factions are flirting with extremism, a charge the party denies.

    On Monday, AfD’s parliamentary caucus in the southwestern state of Baden-Wuerttemberg kicked out lawmaker Stefan Raepple after he reportedly called for the violent overthrow of the government.

    Last week, the party’s caucuses in two northern state assemblies split amid infighting between members.

    TheGuardian

  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alt-right.com
    AfD: It's Time To Discard Germany’s Historical Guilt
    It annoys me that they say that. Even saying that it's time to get rid of "Germany's historical guilt" implies that there has ever been such a historical guilt in the first place. But there has NEVER been something like a "German historical guilt" at all.

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    If that gross treasonous swine Merkel is considered a "conservative" in Germany, I'd shudder to think what's considered extremist left.
    To a certain extent there are parallels of imposed fabricated historical "guilt" here in the American South over negro slavery, memory and heritage of the Confederacy, "Jim Crow" laws (which also existed up North) etc.
    Southerners are repeatedly told nowadays that our ancestors, particularly Confederates, were naught but backwards white supremacist negro-enslaving traitors.
    "Almost every name belongs to well-known families of English stock....these soldiers were of ancient American lineage"- Prof. N.S. Shaler on the 1st Kentucky "Orphan" Brigade, Confederate States Army

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    More guilt and lies

    Quote Originally Posted by Alt-right.com
    AfD: It's Time To Discard Germany’s Historical Guilt
    Of course, it is all about race and guilt on both sides of the Atlantic to lessen the power base of Whites. The elites want to shift power away from Europeans to nonwhites since these academicians claim that we caused all human misery in the world. That is why Africans, Latinos, and South Asians come here to be "used" and "denigrated" by our "micro-aggressive, systemic racist" system. The immigrants today are treated BETTER by our own Western governments than their corrupt 3rd World governments. Germany has guilting still over WW2, even after 80 years, and US has the slavery past. Hirohito and Stalin lived out their lives without trials and imprisonment.

    If you look at the average Black American obesity epidemic rates currently, you really wonder if they've ever been enslaved. (sarcasm) Their owners must have worked the indentured servants, being mostly Irish, British and German subjects, to their early deaths on plantations and other work sites. In school, I remembered teachers claiming that indentured servants had easier jobs like in plantation homes or doing odd work. I mentioned that most labor was manual and took hours to do in or out of the home. They omit that 48% of indentured servants were very young, under 21, and usually unemployed. Some were war prisoners, kidnapped off of streets, and evicted European poor. Everyone has better comforts today, including our poor!

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  12. #139
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    Germany's far-right AfD searching for new momentum ahead of election

    The Alternative for Germany is the country's most successful far-right party since the war. But the latest state election results suggest its popularity may have hit a ceiling.

    This should be a good time for the Alternative for Germany (AfD), if only because Germany has to choose an alternative: Chancellor Angela Merkel is no longer a candidate in September's federal election, leaving the country facing the kind of inevitable upheaval that an anti-mainstream party should be able to exploit.

    Not only that, the built-in uncertainty of Germany's political future has been exacerbated in recent months by a series of legacy-scarring crises marking Merkel's final year in power and eroded trust in the political establishment.

    As political analyst and far-right specialist Florian Hartleb puts it, the coronavirus pandemic has given the AfD opportunities. "Germany is in a big legitimacy crisis," Hartleb told DW. "There's a dramatic decline in support for the government and especially Angela Merkel, because of the lack of vaccines and other issues. This is the perfect opportunity for the AfD, which is the party against the grand coalition."



    Ronald Gläser, AfD spokesman for the state of Berlin, said the government's current struggles could create a new opportunity. "As the dissatisfaction with the coronavirus measures grows, we have the potential to make greater gains," he said. "A blind man with a stick could see that the government is making decisions that contradict any common sense."

    But recent elections suggest the AfD has not made use of this potential. The party lost around a third of its share of the vote in the Baden-Württemberg and Rhineland-Palatinate elections in mid-March — ending up at below 10% in both states, down from 15% five years ago.

    This weekend, the party will regroup in Dresden, one of its eastern German strongholds, to finalize its manifesto and come up with a strategy to revive its momentum in Germany's "super election year" that will culminate in the general election on September 26.

    AfD delegates will likely pin their hopes on the next state election in Saxony-Anhalt in early June, where the AfD took a quarter of the votes in 2016.


    Managing expectations after early success

    Gläser insisted the party is in a good position, despite the election setbacks. "Of course a few people are dissatisfied with the loss of votes, but honestly, it wasn't really surprising," he told DW.

    For one thing, he argued, the AfD was never likely to repeat what he called the "phenomenal" successes of 2016, when the new party gathered up to a quarter of the vote in a series of regional elections.

    Those successes came on the back of the refugee crisis that dominated that year, when the AfD was able to bend the political debate around its own nationalist and at times racist views, going on to become Germany's main opposition party in the Bundestag in 2017 with 12.6% of the national vote.
    Internal strife pushing voters away

    But arguably the AfD's biggest problem has been itself in recent years. Friction in the party during the Baden-Württemberg election has extended to the national party, because two prominent figures in the state's AfD branch happen to be Alice Weidel and Jörg Meuthen, both crucial figures in the national party.

    Meuthen is considered one of the AfD's most high-profile "moderates," a group that has historically been an endangered species. Previous AfD leaders such as Bernd Lucke and Frauke Petry have been excised from the party for opposing the party's more extreme factions.

    In an attempt to avoid a split, Meuthen reached out to the more extremist end of the AfD in 2017, assuring them that "the Wing is and will remain an integral part of our party."

    But the Wing, an informal group often portrayed as a right-wing extremist party within the party, has been under persistent pressure from German authorities in the last two years, and Meuthen's rapprochement disappeared when the Verfassungsschutz (BfV), the German domestic intelligence agency, decided to put the group under heightened surveillance. The Wing was then formally disbanded last year.

    Last month, a BfV investigation concluded that in fact the entire AfD was "a case of suspected far-right extremism" and could be put under strict surveillance. The AfD has so far successfully challenged the decision in court.

    Meanwhile, Meuthen has attempted to install a firewall against the far-right extremists in the party, sometimes initiating expulsion proceedings against politicians who expressed racist views. Most prominent among these lawmakers is Björn Höcke, the leader of the AfD in Thuringia.

    Höcke is the most high-profile figure in the Wing, which, according to Germany's domestic intelligence agency, enjoys the support of up to 40% of AfD members.

    Meuthen failed to remove Höcke — partly because the rest of the AfD's national leaders, including the two parliamentary leaders Weidel and Alexander Gauland, and Meuthen's co-chairman Tino Chrupalla, believe the group is vital for the party to maintain its far-right voter base. Gauland once described Höcke as "the center of the party."

    "Basically, Jörg Meuthen is clearly under fire within the party, and he's not powerful enough to kick the Wing out, which he wanted to do," said Hartleb. "But if I was advising the AfD — which I'm not, of course — I would say: Keep silent because the more they keep silent the more votes they're getting. They lost a lot of energy with these internal struggles."

    But the strife has not yet been put aside. While the upcoming party gathering is formally about the election manifesto, 100 party members have already announced that they want Meuthen to be removed as party leader. And there is pressure to decide now about the top candidate for the general election in September — a decision Meuthen would like to delay.
    What now for the AfD?

    But despite the stain of extremism and the insistence of all other parties that they will never cooperate with the AfD, the party is far from struggling, according to Hartleb, and it has shown no sign of backing down from extremist rhetoric.

    In the latest draft of the AfD election manifesto, unpublished but sent to delegates of the upcoming party conference, the party has intensified anti-immigrant rhetoric since the last manifesto in 2017. There is new emphasis on plans to deport more immigrants and introduce schemes to send refugees back to countries of origin as quickly as possible.

    The problem here is that the AfD no longer has an all-consuming refugee "crisis" to boost its popularity. Nevertheless, Gläser insisted that the AfD maintains a solid presence in Germany's political debate.

    "Our basic criticisms of European bailouts, of illegal mass immigration, of gender politics, of the abolition of fuel-burning cars, still hold," he said. "There are plenty of issues. The point will come when they return to the daily agenda."

    The AfD also claims that it has expanded its voter base in the past few years. It started out in 2013 as a euroskeptic party dominated by academics, but went on to make gains among the economically disadvantaged. "The AfD is much more than just the party of the losers of modernization," Hartleb said. "Many middle-class people vote for the AfD, too."

    "The classic AfD voter is an older working man with a mid-level education qualification," said Gläser. "But we also see ourselves as having a program for everyone, just as all parties do. We're not fixed on certain issues or groups."

    But voter analysis by pollster infratest dimap following the recent state elections suggests that the AfD may have lost the crucial weapon it had in 2016-2017: Its polarizing presence caused a boost in turnout, which it benefited from — more non-voters went for the AfD than other parties.

    This year, the same analysis shows the Greens appear to be winning the battle for non-voters. Momentum makes a big difference in a big election year, and so far it's not with the AfD.

    While you're here: Every Tuesday, DW editors round up what is happening in German politics and society, with an eye toward understanding this year's elections and beyond. You can sign up here for the weekly email newsletter Berlin Briefing, to stay on top of developments as Germany enters the post-Merkel era.

    DW.com

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    Germany’s far-right AfD ahead in regional poll with anti-shutdown stance



    Björn Höcke, party chairman in Thuringia, at an election event in Merseburg, Saxony-Anhalt on May 29th.

    Best known as an anti-migrant party, Germany's far-right AfD has seized on the coronavirus pandemic to court a new type of voter ahead of regional elections in the state of Saxony-Anhalt on Sunday: anti-shutdown activists.

    “Sending so many people into poverty with so few infections is problematic for us,” is how Oliver Kirchner, the AfD’s top candidate in Saxony-Anhalt, views the measures ordered by the government to halt Covid-19 transmission.

    The anti-shutdown stance seems to be paying off in the former East German state. The party is riding high in the polls and even stands a chance of winning a regional election for the first time.

    Surveys have the AfD neck-and-neck with Chancellor Angela Merkel’s CDU, with the Bild daily even predicting victory for the far-right party on 26 percent, ahead of the CDU on 25 percent.

    In Saxony-Anhalt’s last election in 2016, the CDU was the biggest party, scoring 30 percent and forming a coalition with the Social Democrats (SPD) and Greens.

    But the CDU has taken a hammering in the opinion polls in recent months, with voters unhappy with the government’s pandemic management and a corruption scandal involving shady coronavirus mask contracts.

    Social deprivation

    A victory for the AfD would spell a huge upset for the conservatives just four months ahead of a general election in Germany — the first in 16 years not to feature Merkel.

    They started out campaigning against the euro currency in 2013. Then in 2015 they capitalised on public anger over Merkel’s 2015 decision to let in a wave of asylum seekers from conflict-torn countries such as Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq.

    The party caused a sensation in Germany’s last general election in 2017 when it secured almost 13 percent of the vote, entering parliament for the first time as the largest opposition party.

    Troubled by internal divisions and accusations of ties to neo-Nazi fringe groups, the party has more recently seen its support at the national level stagnate at between 10 and 12 percent.

    The party is also controversial in Saxony-Anhalt itself. In state capital Magdeburg, posters showing local candidate Hagen Kohl have been defaced with Hitler moustaches and the words “Never again”.

    For wine merchant Jan Buhmann, 57, victory for the far-right party would be a “disaster”.

    “The pandemic has shown that we need new ideas. We need young people, we need dynamism in the state. For me, the AfD does not stand for that,” he said.

    Yet the AfD’s core supporters have largely remained unwavering in the former East German states.

    For pensioner Hans-Joachim Peters, 73, the AfD is “the only party that actually tells it like it is”.

    Politicians should “think less about Europe and more about Germany”, he told AFP in Magdeburg. AfD campaigners there were handing out flyers calling for “resistance” and “an end to all anti-constitutional restrictions on our liberties”.

    Political scientist Hajo Funke of Berlin’s Free University puts the AfD’s core strength in eastern Germany down to “social deprivation and frustration” resulting from problems with reunification.

    The party’s latest anti-corona restrictions stance has also helped it play up its anti-establishment credentials, adding some voters to its core base, he said.

    Other east German states in which the AfD has a stronghold, such as Saxony and Thuringia, continue to have the highest 7-day incidences per 100,000 residents in the country. Saxony-Anhalt’s 7-day incidence, however, currently is below the national average (31.3) as of Wednesday June 3rd.

    Hijab snub

    Funke predicted the AfD would attract broadly the same voters in Saxony-Anhalt as it did in 2016, when it won 24 percent of the vote.

    “Some have dropped off because the party is too radical, some radicals who didn’t vote are now voting and some of those who are anti-corona are also voting for the AfD,” he said.

    The Sachsen-Anhalt-Monitor 2020 report, commissioned by the local government, found that the main concern for voters in the region was the economic fallout from the pandemic. But the AfD’s core selling point — immigration and refugees — was number two on their list.

    According to AfD candidate Kirchner, many people in Saxony-Anhalt still view the influx of refugees to Germany “very critically”.

    “And I think they are right,” he said at a campaign stand in Magdeburg decked in the AfD’s signature blue. “Who is going to rebuild Syria? Who is going to do that if everyone comes here?”

    When a young woman wearing a hijab walked past the stand, no one attempted to hand her a flyer.

    Thelocal.de

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